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Crème Brûlée making process upgrade?


Vojta
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Why do you bake it in the oven at high temperatures and risk overcooking? Or making it complicated in sous vide. Isn't Crème Brûlée just a custard? Let's cook it in a saucepan, pour it into the dishes after and let them set. So much easier, isn't it? 

Where is the catch now, because nobody does it this way 😄

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It is very much a function of taste and textural preferences.    AFAIK and do, it is baked at a low temperature to ensure a silken custard, so overcooking is seldom a risk.    And there is a discernible difference between stovetop and baked custard texture, one soft and creamy, the other distinctly "cuttable" with one's spoon.    Just different results.   Up to you,  

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eGullet member #80.

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12 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

baked at a low temperature to ensure a silken custard, so overcooking is seldom a risk

I think it is a risk easily. To cook the custard you need about 83 °C, while most recipes call for baking in a water bath in 160 °C oven. I steam cooked mine (thus the temp was 100 °C) and it was still enough to overcook. Might be just mine mistake though :D

 

Thanks for letting me know. I need to test the texture differences 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Pete Fred said:

Baked in metal rings. Then, once chilled, warm the rings with a blowtorch and lift clear. Surprisingly simple. 👍

Thanks Pete. Would never thought about pouring liquid into a ring. Will give it a try!

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Just for clarity…

 

Seal bottom of rings tightly with a double layer of clingfilm. Once cooked and chilled, remove clingfilm and set the ring on plate. Gently warm ring with a torch, no need to go crazy. Carefully lift the ring up and away. Eat the beautiful thing you have made. 

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