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Making gluten-free bread in a bread machine.


Darienne
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This is brand new to me.  I had to reach 81 years of age to find out that I can no longer tolerate either gluten or dairy.  Avoiding dairy...while heartbreaking...oh cheese...oh cheese...is simple.  There are now so many easy to buy or make dairy substitutes available.  And you can use them just in just about any recipe.  Not so for bread.  

 

I've been using a bread machine for a good number of years now but have never looked for a recipe for making gluten-free bread.  I know they are available online and in books which I could either buy or get through my library.  But what I would really like is to attend a workshop on the subject.  Second to that, read of any useful experiences that any eGer has had finding a good recipe for making the bread in a machine.  

 

(Yes, I know I should learn to make bread by hand, but it ain't gonna happen.)

 

Thanks. 

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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It's been a few years since I looked into that for my daughter, but tonight I'll try to block out time to go searching. Ultimately in my case I went with a by-hand recipe, but I'm sure there are usable machine-bread recipes as well.

 

As an interim stopgap, I can affirm that the "Promise" brand of GF breads (sold at Sobeys and its affiliated brands, perhaps elsewhere) is palatable and has that "soft, fluffy store-bought bread" texture that many people like.

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16 minutes ago, chromedome said:

It's been a few years since I looked into that for my daughter, but tonight I'll try to block out time to go searching. Ultimately in my case I went with a by-hand recipe, but I'm sure there are usable machine-bread recipes as well.

 

As an interim stopgap, I can affirm that the "Promise" brand of GF breads (sold at Sobeys and its affiliated brands, perhaps elsewhere) is palatable and has that "soft, fluffy store-bought bread" texture that many people like.

Promise bread you say?  The very one I have been using since I found it.  Thanks.  Still a king's ransom to pay for...

 

And thank you.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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Curious to hear about any GF Bread recipes, machine or not! 

 

Going totally GF years ago after my little guy was diagnosed with Celiac disease, we tried at one point to make pizza dough.  I recall it being the stickiest mess ever, and after many four letter expletives, I swore I would never make it from scratch again.  Silver Hills has a good GF bread which we use daily.  Aiden's has an acceptable french GF 'baguette'. 

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https://www.kingarthurbaking.com/blog/2015/06/23/how-to-make-gluten-free-bread-bread-machine

 

You might find talking with a baker on the hotline helpful 855-371-2253 (BAKE)

 

Because of my arthritis, King Arthur Baking hotline have told me to make ALL of their recipes in the bread machine. If the recipe is complicated, call the hotline first.

 

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Made my first gluten-free bread in my bread machine which has no gluten free setting.  The loaf will not win prizes for shape, but it is delicious.  Recipe for whole wheat bread from All Recipes. 

 

Thinking about getting a new bread machine....

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

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First time I've stepped into a second-hand store in a couple of years.  Ed wanted to look for some electrical connections so I said..OK.  Went to the kitchen section and lo! and behold!  a very modern up-to-date breadmaker for $18.00 complete with the needed gluten-free setting.  I could hardly believe my luck.  

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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On 10/31/2022 at 12:13 PM, TicTac said:

Silver Hills has a good GF bread which we use daily.  Aiden's has an acceptable french GF 'baguette'. 

I have mentioned these to my gluten-free daughter, and she wondered if you were familiar with the Promise brand and what you thought of it. Thanks. 

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On 11/10/2022 at 3:04 PM, Anna N said:

I have mentioned these to my gluten-free daughter, and she wondered if you were familiar with the Promise brand and what you thought of it. Thanks. 

Definitely the best of all the grocery store ones.  Sobey's carries it near us.  Thanks. 

 

Edited by Darienne (log)
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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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13 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I have mentioned these to my gluten-free daughter, and she wondered if you were familiar with the Promise brand and what you thought of it. Thanks. 

I really like the Promise brand.  It is tougher to find in our area as not every Sobey's has it.  Our main staple (I think Silver Hills makes it, though I might have been mistaken) is called 'Little Northern Bakehouse' - their 'whole wheat' version is quite good for a GF bread.

 

 

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32 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Also will add - Schar makes some great deli style sourdough bread - but it is stupidly expensive ($6-7 / 6-8 slices).

 

 

Apparently our nearby Sobeys carries it along with 4 other local stores.   Still...if I can make decent gluten-free bread I will do so. 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

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On 11/10/2022 at 4:00 PM, Darienne said:

Apparently our nearby Sobeys carries it along with 4 other local stores.   Still...if I can make decent gluten-free bread I will do so. 

When you crack the code, do share the cipher.

 

 

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Made my first loaf of gluten-free bread in a machine with a gluten-free setting...my second-hand Breadman stainless steel bargain.  Again I used a whole wheat recipe from All Recipes.  The loaf has a good texture...if you like 'substantial'...and we do.  The shape turned out pretty well...except the top fell, apparently a common problem with gluten-free homemade loaves.  I'll try other recipes as time goes by.  

 

Ate my new loaf of bread toasted for breakfast today with almond butter and prune spread.  Very good.   So far the breads I've made taste far better toasted than un-toasted.  

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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I ran into that when I was trying GF recipes for my daughter. Cutting back on the liquids (by up to 1/4 cup), or cutting back on the yeast (if it seems to be over-proofing) both helped, depending on the recipe. So did lower temperatures/longer baking times, but those are harder to manage in a bread machine.

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"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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11 minutes ago, chromedome said:

I ran into that when I was trying GF recipes for my daughter. Cutting back on the liquids (by up to 1/4 cup), or cutting back on the yeast (if it seems to be over-proofing) both helped, depending on the recipe. So did lower temperatures/longer baking times, but those are harder to manage in a bread machine.

Lots left to learn and with luck, master.  Still drowning learning about the various flours.  Made the same cookie using two different gluten-free flours...Bob's Red Mill and Robin Hood, and the cookies came out somewhat differently.  Hmmm....

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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6 hours ago, Darienne said:

Ate my new loaf of bread toasted for breakfast today with almond butter and prune spread.  Very good.   So far the breads I've made taste far better toasted than un-toasted.  

 

I've found that to be true for our locally made commercial loaves, too, as well as the ones I occasionally get from Costco.

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  • 1 month later...

Just made my third loaf of whole wheat bread in my "new" Breadman bread machine on the gluten free setting.  I'm still using the recipe from All Recipes.  Subbed potato starch in for millet because I didn't have any millet left.  Worked out really well.  And the taste is completely acceptable.  And the top, praise be, didn't collapse for the first time.  Why?  I don't know.   

HOWEVER:  the collapsible Breadman mixing paddle is gigantic and rips a huge hole in the baked loaf...much larger than in any of my earlier bread machines (bought a "new" second hand machine with each visit to Moab for a few dinaro and gave one away when I got back home)...and I'm next working on how to remove that paddle after the mixing.  There are lots of instructions on how to do it.  Apparently each machine is different and it's up to the user to figure out the timing cycle.   

 

Anyone have any experience with this paddle removal?

 

Eventually I am aiming at a loaf with whole grains in it.  

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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13 minutes ago, Darienne said:

How do you know it is 'ready'?

 

I don't know about the Breadman but my bread machine had a setting just for dough and after the bread had kneaded and raised it stopped and you could take the dough out and bake it however you wanted. Did you get a manual with yours? If not, you can download it from the internet.

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1 hour ago, Darienne said:

Just made my third loaf of whole wheat bread in my "new" Breadman bread machine on the gluten free setting.  I'm still using the recipe from All Recipes.  Subbed potato starch in for millet because I didn't have any millet left.  Worked out really well.  And the taste is completely acceptable.  And the top, praise be, didn't collapse for the first time.  Why?  I don't know.   

HOWEVER:  the collapsible Breadman mixing paddle is gigantic and rips a huge hole in the baked loaf...much larger than in any of my earlier bread machines (bought a "new" second hand machine with each visit to Moab for a few dinaro and gave one away when I got back home)...and I'm next working on how to remove that paddle after the mixing.  There are lots of instructions on how to do it.  Apparently each machine is different and it's up to the user to figure out the timing cycle.   

 

Anyone have any experience with this paddle removal?

 

Eventually I am aiming at a loaf with whole grains in it.  

Good for you Darienne!  We have not been so adventurous yet with our GF life (and it's been 4+ years).  I think the pizza dough experiment scarred me a bit (it was so damn sticky and unworkable!).

 

Would love to see some pics of your bread.  And totally agreed on toasted vs not.  GF Bread really has to be toasted to be best enjoyed. 

 

 

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