Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

The Official Downton Abbey Cookbook


Recommended Posts

Over on the Crazy Good e-Book Bargains there was discussion of the Official Downton Abbey Cookbook - here.

 

My interest was the discussion of pikelets so this afternoon I went searching for the recipe from the book (without getting the book). Found a YouTube version without much trouble. 

 

Guided by @Anna N's memories of the pikelets from the market in Derby - I added a fair bit more milk to the recipe than called for in order to make thinner pikelets more in line which what Anna recalled. 

 

IMG_4451.thumb.JPG.6d84b233901ed7f2081647068dbc384d.JPG

 

After just an hour on the counter - I had a very bubbly yeast batter.

 

IMG_4450.thumb.JPG.50c42563cbb6edfbc19956a8d4edbf7c.JPG

 

IMG_4449.thumb.JPG.54be523249fc82f50db0e7ca1db409c2.JPG

 

And here are the finished results - bit of butter and jam - very nice!

 

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm. I've always known pikelets to use a non-yeast batter. My mother made them regularly, although we didn't use that name, not being from Yorkshire.

But hey! Downton Abbey is fictional, isn't it?

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Kerry also found this . The very place from which my childhood memories emerge. The  magical Market Hall filled with stalls selling everything from knickers to knockwurst. I believe it has all gone now replaced by a. modern, characterless shopping mall called The Eagle Centre. Haven’t been back for years so even that Centre may have disappeared by now.  
Hoping to see other people perhaps cooking from this book. There were certainly plenty of fans when the series first aired. 

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, liuzhou said:

Hmmm. I've always known pikelets to use a non-yeast batter. My mother made them regularly, although we didn't use that name, not being from Yorkshire.

But hey! Downton Abbey is fictional, isn't it?

There are certainly varieties of pikelets  that differ an ingredients and in size.  The ones I recall were considerably larger in diameter than a crumpet and much thinner.

There seems to be some suggestion that those made in the Midlands used buttermilk and that in other parts of the country they were made with milk. 
One could probably write a doctoral thesis on the history of griddlecakes!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Anna N said:

There are certainly varieties of pikelets  that differ an ingredients and in size.  The ones I recall were considerably larger in diameter than a crumpet and much thinner.

There seems to be some suggestion that those made in the Midlands used buttermilk and that in other parts of the country they were made with milk. 
One could probably write a doctoral thesis on the history of griddlecakes!

 

It is indeed a complex subject, both in terms of recipe and terminology. My mother used self-raising flour  and milk. I don't think she ever saw or used yeast in her life. Or buttermilk - I guess that was used to activate the baking soda, often used before the advent of self-raising flour.

 

I do like Annie Gray's writing, though.

  • Like 1

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

It is indeed a complex subject, both in terms of recipe and terminology.

Apparently the Aussies have claimed them as their own!

It wasn’t until I was in my 20’s that I learned that pikelets are actually a very Aussie thing.”

 

 

Here.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

1 minute ago, Anna N said:

Apparently the Aussies have claimed them as their own!

It wasn’t until I was in my 20’s that I learned that pikelets are actually a very Aussie thing.”

 

 

Here.

 

Haha! That is easily to refute. They existed before Australia was colonised (unless the aboriginals invented the same thing. Unlikely.)

Anyway, those pictures are what are known in Scotland as pancakes or Scotch pancakes.
 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my research there were clearly a few different options - self raising flour, yeast, both - thin or thick, Scottish, aussie… 

 

What thickness were your moms version?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

In my research there were clearly a few different options - self raising flour, yeast, both - thin or thick, Scottish, aussie… 

 

What thickness were your moms version?

 

2-3 cm max. More towards the thinner end.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall:

 

“Tea time, that most soothing of British institutions, can be a rather heated affair depending on who you have around the table. Those from the Midlands and north will say that what I call a crumpet is a pikelet. Antipodeans argue that a pikelet is a drop scone. And Americans gaze disappointedly at my muffins, yearning for a cakier offering filled with fruit, nuts, even chocolate. But whatever you call them, they're all vehicles for butter (a dollop or two of jam wouldn't go amiss, either). The bolding is mine. 

this

 

Something is just not right here! I know what a crumpet is. It is NOT a pikelet. 70+ years is plenty of time for a memory to get muddled. But I still remember something perhaps side-plate size, not much thicker than a crêpe and relatively flexible. I am going to pick my sister ‘s brains very shortly. But we were raised separately and I suspect she will not count pikelets among her memories. 
But as a bonus my link will give you three of HFW’s recipes!

 

  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't thing I have ever heard of Hugh Fearnley  Whittingstall.  So, thank you for that.  I plan  on spending some time looking through his recipe collection.

 

We don't eat breakfast here but do have a mid-morning snack.  We sometimes have breakfast for lunch.  Today it is pikelets with maple syrup and breakfasf sausage.  The dough/butter is almost ready!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hugh Fairly Whatshisname is correct. The names are completely variable depending on location. I'd never come across the word 'pikelet' until about four years ago (I'm also in my 70s) and assumed it was some kind of fish! Still not convinced I am wrong.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 1
  • Haha 4

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Hugh Fairly Whatshisname is correct. The names are completely variable depending on location. I'd never come across the word 'pikelet' until about four years ago (I'm also in my 70s) and assumed it was some kind of fish! Still not convinced I am wrong.

Ah yes, a baby pike.  I remember once a friend and I were on a fishing trip and he caught a pike.  Those have a row of Y bones and was a real pain to clean.  But, very tasty.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I am pleased to report my memory is intact. My sister described the pikelets I recall exactly as I recall them. And they were bought from Monk’s barrow at the Market Hall. 
Quoting my sister from my memory of this morning‘s phone call:

“They were 6 or 7 inches in  diameter and about the same thickness as what we now call a wrap. They were full of little holes similar but not the same as a crumpet. They were foldable or rollable. They were made not with white flour but with what was probably wholewheat flour. Much, much tastier than wraps that we get today.”

and that’s what I recall but could not quite articulate. 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Well I am pleased to report my memory is intact. My sister described the pikelets I recall exactly as I recall them. And they were bought from Monk’s barrow at the Market Hall. 
Quoting my sister from my memory of this morning‘s phone call:

“They were 6 or 7 inches in  diameter and about the same thickness as what we now call a wrap. They were full of little holes similar but not the same as a crumpet. They were foldable or rollable. They were made not with white flour but with what was probably wholewheat flour. Much, much tastier than wraps that we get today.”

and that’s what I recall but could not quite articulate. 

 

Interesting - I believe Monk's barrow also made oatcakes - wonder if there was oat flour in there too?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It took a few hours of research and it is an Australian interpretation but except for the size and the inclusion of the yabbies, these are what I recall. 

Here. 

I see @Captainoffered his version of the treat in the breakfast thread sometime when I was off-line for a while. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is such a fun thread….. makes me want to head down all the rabbit holes  🕳 🐇 

  • Like 2

"There are no mistakes in bread baking, only more bread crumbs"

*Bernard Clayton, Jr.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...