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Kellogg breaking into 3 companies


heidih
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Kellog's has an interesting history. Started by a raving lunatic, though.

 

"The Road to Wellville" is a 1993 novel by T. C. Boyle based on the birth of the company. A good read. I understand it has also been made into a movie, but I haven't seen that.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Perhaps the most interesting take away from the above article is the following:

 

“The company has in recent years focused on its global snacking portfolio, as sales of U.S. cereals have declined with more Americans taking to snacking and relying on fast-food chains for breakfast.”

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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43 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Kellog's has an interesting history. Started by a raving lunatic, though.

 

"The Road to Wellville" is a 1993 novel by T. C. Boyle based on the birth of the company. A good read. I understand it has also been made into a movie, but I haven't seen that.

Yes the whole health regime craze very early on. 

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Posted (edited)
34 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Perhaps the most interesting take away from the above article is the following:

 

“The company has in recent years focused on its global snacking portfolio, as sales of U.S. cereals have declined with more Americans taking to snacking and relying on fast-food chains for breakfast.”

The egg McMuffin certainly has a dedicated following and the egg sandwiches from bodegas are beloved as are breakfast burritos from trucks out here. I never did understand being satisfied by a bowl of flakes with cold milk but comfort for many I guess. The cereal aisles here are vast and I asked my niece was it like that in Sydney. She said yes though not so many sugary ones....as she snacked on a bowl of Special K with dried berries before starting her remote work day - and the woman can cook well.  I did not realize the Kellogg snack portfolio was so huge.

Edited by heidih (log)
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To me the key takeaway was that execs expect the market value of the three new operations will exceed the value of the company as it currently exists. In other words, beneath the pious platitudes about growing market share through niche focus, they expect to reap a short-term windfall that's unrelated to actual success or growth; rather like the effect of stock buybacks.

 

Juicing shareholder value through things other than, you know...innovation? Increased sales? ...always feels sketchy to me.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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11 hours ago, liuzhou said:

Kellog's has an interesting history. Started by a raving lunatic, though.

 

"The Road to Wellville" is a 1993 novel by T. C. Boyle based on the birth of the company. A good read. I understand it has also been made into a movie, but I haven't seen that.

 

So I thought I should watch it. The movie is terrible. They turned the novel into some sort of goofy sex comedy, which the book certainly wasn't.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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