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Advice on adding whey protein powder to breads and cakes, please.


cteavin
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Hi

 

I workout regularly and am always looking for ways to increase my protein content. Recently, my gym started selling a "protein bread" which started me thinking about how I can make my own. I keep 5kg bags of unflavored whey protein on hand. Does anyone have any advice on how to 

 

1) add whey protein to homemade breads?

 

2) add whey protein to angel food or chiffon cakes?

 

What would be the upper limit in adding whey protein to a baked good and would I need to adjust the hydration? Has anyone done this? Thoughts in general? 

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Also worthwhile, if you’re a yogurt or cheese maker, to sub whey for the liquid in your recipe.

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On 4/28/2022 at 11:08 PM, kayb said:

Also worthwhile, if you’re a yogurt or cheese maker, to sub whey for the liquid in your recipe.

 

Do you mean add whey protein powder to the milk or are you talking about using the liquid whey from the previous batch of yogurt? 

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Posted (edited)

I have tried dried whey but there are other protein powders I like better in yeast breads, rolls, etc.  I used the following until I used it up, then tried a few more products designed for smoothies but work great in baked goods.  I decided that I like the texture and the flavor of the breads and rolls made with this product better than the others.  I recently ordered it again.

 

A year ago I got a container of Octonuts Almond Protein powder, a California product.

 

Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Whey protein powders are often adulterated with anabolic steroids. Weight lifters take them.  FDA has a long list of bad products. Many times they are available from seemingly  reputable sources. 

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We also have the unflavored whey protein and pea protein on hand. We usually just use them for smoothies, but my husband has had success with the migraine diet (no added sugars, gf, lower carb/higher proportion of protein), so I've tried baking with them some. He avoids legumes, so he just uses whey, and I haven't liked the baked pea protein so much when I've tried using it for myself. One of the brownie recipes we've used is from the big man's world blog, something like 1/2c almond butter, 1/2 c cocoa, 1 c pumpkin. Adding 1/4 c whey didn't seem to affect the flavor, but it did help firm the brownies a little. https://thebigmansworld.com/healthy-3-ingredient-flourless-pumpkin-brownies/

I've also used chocolate covered katie's almond flour banana bread https://chocolatecoveredkatie.com/almond-flour-banana-bread/ but instead of 2c almond flour, used 1 1/2 c almond flour, 2TB coconut flour, 1TB bob's red mill gf flour, and 2TB whey. Straight almond flour for me is too soft. 

 

I have used the buttermilk powder in wheat flour sandwich bread recipes, and though I don't recall trying to sub whey protein, it seems like it should work as a substitution.

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On 5/1/2022 at 10:49 PM, gfweb said:

Whey protein powders are often adulterated with anabolic steroids. Weight lifters take them.  FDA has a long list of bad products. Many times they are available from seemingly  reputable sources. 


Whey is fairly inexpensive. Adding steroids (with an high black market price) will significantly increase the value and asking price. I am certain there is a market for “spiked” whey, but I would be certain that if you purchase a run-of-the-mill whey powder at market price, it would not be adulterated with steroids. Other stuff perhaps, but again here whey isolate is a huge market and buying from a reputable source should avoid any nasty surprise.

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On 5/2/2022 at 5:49 AM, gfweb said:

Whey protein powders are often adulterated with anabolic steroids. Weight lifters take them.  FDA has a long list of bad products. Many times they are available from seemingly  reputable sources. 

 

That's false. One, steroids are illegal and so no company would put them in their protein powder. Two, the amount of steroids a person takes can not be haphazard, it has to be precisely administered on a strict schedule. You might be conflating creatine and/or amino acids which are added to whey and casein proteins. 

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Posted (edited)
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17 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

Thank you. If you actually read beyond the headline, you'll see the articles talk about "body building products" -- a wide umbrella -- but none mentioned protein powder. Just one quote from your googling:

 

These bodybuilding products are promoted as hormone products and/or as alternatives to anabolic steroids for increasing muscle mass and strength.

 

In other words, they are not in protein powders.

 

Here's a challenge for you: Show me ONE. Just one. Go online and find me ONE protein powder that has steroids in it.

 

__________

 

The article from the Hinustantimes says they busted a company that had steroids in the protein powder. The steroids they found were adenosine monophosphate and mephentermine sulphate which are not steroids at all but found is some pre-work drinks to stimulate the body. The writer does not know what they are talking about and is using steroids as a synonym for performance enhancing chemicals. Not the same thing.

 

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1067/adenosine

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mephentermine

 

When you talk about steroids in bodybuilding you are talking about anabolic steroids and there is a strict method of administering them. I know because I have taken them. They are NOT used lightly and a NOT willy nilly placed in products where you can not get an exact dosage. They are contained in ampules (for injections) or tables to swallow, not powders. Again, show me just one protein powder that has steroids. I'll wait. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

This is a good example how the Google algorithm is effective to combine certain associated word fields, but fails to “grasp” the real content of articles.

 

Anyway, back to the original topic. My (very limited) experience with making high protein breads was always employing eggs and some sort of fresh cheese variety. I know that especially the latter is tricky to come by in Japan (at least for a decent price). 

Adding whey powder to sweetened items (e.g. cupcakes) dries them out a bit,  so you need to up the fat content (you see frequently coconut fat added, which might be for that purpose, of for the short chain fatty acids). This in return usually retards yeast activity, so be mindful of that.
 

Another option would be not to aim for leavened bread, but flatbread (for wraps etc.). That would be more forgiving and I think that flour, whey, yoghurt and baking powder should give you a nice base to start experimenting. 

Edited by Duvel (log)
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3 hours ago, cteavin said:

 

Thank you. If you actually read beyond the headline, you'll see the articles talk about "body building products" -- a wide umbrella -- but none mentioned protein powder. Just one quote from your googling:

 

These bodybuilding products are promoted as hormone products and/or as alternatives to anabolic steroids for increasing muscle mass and strength.

 

In other words, they are not in protein powders.

 

Here's a challenge for you: Show me ONE. Just one. Go online and find me ONE protein powder that has steroids in it.

 

__________

 

The article from the Hinustantimes says they busted a company that had steroids in the protein powder. The steroids they found were adenosine monophosphate and mephentermine sulphate which are not steroids at all but found is some pre-work drinks to stimulate the body. The writer does not know what they are talking about and is using steroids as a synonym for performance enhancing chemicals. Not the same thing.

 

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1067/adenosine

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mephentermine

 

When you talk about steroids in bodybuilding you are talking about anabolic steroids and there is a strict method of administering them. I know because I have taken them. They are NOT used lightly and a NOT willy nilly placed in products where you can not get an exact dosage. They are contained in ampules (for injections) or tables to swallow, not powders. Again, show me just one protein powder that has steroids. I'll wait. 

 

 

 

Nevertheless there are adulterated whey products https://www.hindustantimes.com/pune-news/steroids-in-muscle-building-protein-powders-fda-pune-orders-statewide-checks/story-biEiAkl4t0a6QFEc0CYmLL.htmlhttps://www.hindustantimes.com/pune-news/steroids-in-muscle-building-protein-powders-fda-pune-orders-statewide-checks/story-biEiAkl4t0a6QFEc0CYmLL.html

 

The fact that properly given steroids are on a protocol has nothing to do with adulterated products, which are pretty much by definition given by non-experts and not given according to a serious protocol.  

 

Why so combative?  You just might be wrong...

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Duvel said:

Anyway, back to the original topic. My (very limited) experience with making high protein breads was always employing eggs and some sort of fresh cheese variety. I know that especially the latter is tricky to come by in Japan (at least for a decent price). 

Adding whey powder to sweetened items (e.g. cupcakes) dries them out a bit,  so you need to up the fat content (you see frequently coconut fat added, which might be for that purpose, of for the short chain fatty acids). This in return usually retards yeast activity, so be mindful of that.
 

Another option would be not to aim for leavened bread, but flatbread (for wraps etc.). That would be more forgiving and I think that flour, whey, yoghurt and baking powder should give you a nice base to start experimenting. 

Adding cheese would up the calories and defeat the purpose (for me). Maybe quark? I might give this a shot this afternoon. :)

 

You know, I have tried adding a spoonful of whey to my roti and the result is very dense flatbread. From what I've been reading online, when adding whey to bread the suggestion is 2-5% the weight of the flour. Personally, I wanna see how far I can take it. ;)

 

And the high-protein breads they sell here are very dry, so adding oil is a good solution but I wonder if I could add tangzhong to add moisture back in...

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7 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

Nevertheless there are adulterated whey products https://www.hindustantimes.com/pune-news/steroids-in-muscle-building-protein-powders-fda-pune-orders-statewide-checks/story-biEiAkl4t0a6QFEc0CYmLL.htmlhttps://www.hindustantimes.com/pune-news/steroids-in-muscle-building-protein-powders-fda-pune-orders-statewide-checks/story-biEiAkl4t0a6QFEc0CYmLL.html

 

The fact that properly given steroids are on a protocol has nothing to do with adulterated products, which are pretty much by definition given by non-experts and not given according to a serious protocol.  

 

Why so combative?  You just might be wrong...

 

I'm not combative. I asserting, and now you're moving the goal posts. 

 

I have been working out for 30+ years and have been using protein powders -- and other supplements -- at least that long. And for you to come here and falsely peddle misinformation, try to back it up, and then move the goal posts is disrespectful. 

 

Fact: Steroids are NOT in protein powders.

Fact: Protein powders sometimes have additional additives, most commonly creatine and BCAA.

 

In India, the source of two of your articles, the manufactures there might add other ingredients to their whey products -- I don't know and your article doesn't open. What I do know is that the author of the previous article was writing outside their ken and mis-labeled something as steroids, so I advise you to find a better source. 

 

Again, show me ONE product with actual steroids in it. Just one. If you can not do that, then acknowledge you misspoke and close the topic. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, cteavin said:

 

I'm not combative. I asserting, and now you're moving the goal posts. 

 

I have been working out for 30+ years and have been using protein powders -- and other supplements -- at least that long. And for you to come here and falsely peddle misinformation, try to back it up, and then move the goal posts is disrespectful. 

 

Fact: Steroids are NOT in protein powders.

Fact: Protein powders sometimes have additional additives, most commonly creatine and BCAA.

 

In India, the source of two of your articles, the manufactures there might add other ingredients to their whey products -- I don't know and your article doesn't open. What I do know is that the author of the previous article was writing outside their ken and mis-labeled something as steroids, so I advise you to find a better source. 

 

Again, show me ONE product with actual steroids in it. Just one. If you can not do that, then acknowledge you misspoke and close the topic. 

 

 

 

So India doesn't count to you?  Indian products don't end up in other countries?  You write off India just because?

 

I have plenty of actual experience. And whether or not a quick google will support it, I know for a fact that some whey products have had anabolic steroid adulteration.

 

now good bye

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by gfweb (log)
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4 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

So India doesn't count to you?  Indian products don't end up in other countries?  You write off India just because?

 

I have plenty of actual experience. And whether or not a quick google will support it, I know for a fact that some whey products have had anabolic steroid adulteration.

 

You cited two articles from the Hindusan times, which suggests you're talking about products in India, something I have no knowledge about. But, that first article confused steroids with work out supplements, so you should re-think your position. 

 

The proof is simple. Show ONE example of a protein powder with steroids. Being that you can not do that, you are wrong. You simply have too much pride to admit you're wrong and so you're experiencing cognitive dissonance. If you can not handle admitting you're wrong, the perhaps you shouldn't be participating in online forums. 

 

Again, if you can provide us with just ONE protein powder that has been adulterated with steroids, I will concede and apologize. Otherwise, you are not contributing to this conversation. 

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43 minutes ago, weinoo said:

I don’t understand the need for extra protein…don’t many of us already have plenty of protein in our diets?

 

I work out. I also don't eat a lot of meat. Adding protein powder to foods is a great way for me to meet my daily goals. 😁

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I tried adding WPI long ago to some home-made healthy crackers and found it did not bake up well at all; also, at the time, I had almost no experience with baking.  You have interesting questions, if you decide to try, please follow up.  I'd be especially curious about angel food cake option.

Have you looked into pea protein?  That seems to be a pretty popular product lately, although, I think it's just ground up dried peas and would probably taste rather vile.. actually, thinking it through, I want to say the vegetable proteins might give better results with certain baked goods, but there's no science or theory behind this, just pure conjecture.

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