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OK, I got a strange idea.


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and I need a little advice. I've been thinking of trying to make a type of Limoncello, but I live in Ohio, where the official state fruit is the Paw-Paw fruit. I was thinking of using it (when it comes into season) instead of limes. However, they are rather different from each other. One has zest and is grated, the other has pulp that is used. Any advice would be appreciated.

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I know nothing of Paw-Paws but have made a number of fruit-infused liqueurs. With a fresh, ripe fruit, you don’t need a high proof spirit or the very lengthy infusion times as often recommended for limoncello. 
Choose your base spirit based on your intended use and personal preferences. Vodka will be most neutral and let the fruit flavor dominate. A white rum or blanco or reposado tequila might also be nice. 
I’d recommend this recipe for tequila por mi amante as a guide for you to use with vodka, rum or tequila, as you like. Use the paw paw flesh without skin or seeds in case they have any bitter flavors. Or leave them in to see what happens. 
In any case, the infused spirit will taste smoother after it sits a while after straining. You can sweeten it at this time, as one would do with limoncello but I’ve found fruits like berries or melon to be pleasantly sweet without added sugar. 
Edited to say that you can add some citric acid and malic acid for a bit of tang if that’s needed. 

Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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I'd look into whether there are recipes for liqueurs made with fruits with a similar texture/consistency.  Limoncello is about dissolving the _oils_ in the skin of the lemons into the alcohol.  Getting a mango-cello would be a totally different thing because mangos are pulpy and the flavor isn't in an oil that can be coaxed to dissolve into alcohol.  I'd imagine that pawpaws and mangos will have more in common with each other... and I can't recall crossing paths with any mango booze... you might be headed into distillation country if you want to get something alcoholic and full of pawpaw flavor... 

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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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I don't know about 'cello, but you can make pawpaw vinegar—@gfron1 has done it—then turn it into a shrub and use in a cocktail.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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There is a paw-paw fruit festival coming up in September. I could probably get some hands on advice there. But if the fruit is more like a mango, than perhaps a “Crème de” type beverage instead of a “cello” type?

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Paw paw are soft somewhat fibrous fruit. The taste is banana-like to me. There's no oily rind. 

 

I'm thinking that a frozen sort of drink that is blended and carries an umbrella is in order. 

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6 hours ago, Alex said:

I don't know about 'cello, but you can make pawpaw vinegar—@gfron1 has done it—then turn it into a shrub and use in a cocktail.

Excellent idea!  I was going suggest making a paw-paw shrub with coconut vinegar but making paw-paw vinegar would be even better!

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FWIW, I have gone down that road and parallel roads and while pawpaw may have save the Lewis and Clark expedition, it is a pain the ass. This pic is my attempt at pawpaw tepache, trying to be all Zero Waste with the numerous seeds and the remaining meat that was clinging to them. It was pretty amazing to watch it turn into a huge glob of snot, which some biochemist on FB explained to me why it happened (over my head, but if you're interested you could find the post in 2019). Our best success has been simply to add pulp to whatever we want in it. The vinegar mentioned above we do annually and is simply 20-30% pulp plus distilled water, plus one of our blonde vinegar mothers.

Tepache.jpg

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3 hours ago, gfron1 said:

one of our blonde vinegar mothers

 

I had one of those, too. Oh, wait...

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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On 4/24/2022 at 7:53 AM, cdh said:

I'd look into whether there are recipes for liqueurs made with fruits with a similar texture/consistency.  Limoncello is about dissolving the _oils_ in the skin of the lemons into the alcohol.  Getting a mango-cello would be a totally different thing because mangos are pulpy and the flavor isn't in an oil that can be coaxed to dissolve into alcohol.  I'd imagine that pawpaws and mangos will have more in common with each other... and I can't recall crossing paths with any mango booze..


Along these lines, Chris Schlesinger had a recipe for a mango pineapple daiquiri that I thought was great when I made it with friends back in my 20’s.  (This should smack of an endorsement of highly dubious value.)


It was roughly:

1 pineapple, top and bottom cut off, quartered

2 mangos peeled

Zero of 3 limes

1/2 cup sugar

vanilla bean

 

quart amber rum

pint dark rum

pint white rum

 

all tossed into a large glass jar.   Age in fridge.

 

it would probably work with paw paws substituted for mangos.

 

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21 hours ago, Alex said:

 

I had one of those, too. Oh, wait...

Now in my defense...just take some Braggs and add it and the mother will grow. When I say blonde, all I mean is that we have some mothers that go into white wine, pale colored juices, etc. v. red wine, hibiscus, etc.

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4 hours ago, gfron1 said:

all I mean is that we have some mothers that go into white wine

 

Yeah, my mother got into white wine, too! Oh, wait...

 

(I could go on like this forever. But I won't. You're welcome.)

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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