Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Cook-Off #89: Pâtés and Terrines


Duvel
 Share

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

My new cookbook, Six California Kitchens, has a recipe for oxtail terrine that I’ll try next. 
I like that she suggests to cook enough of the oxtail to serve on its own, then make the terrine the next day. 

That sounds really good.

 

Oxtail used to be a cheap thing that I could get around here....not anymore.  Last time at the store it was like $17 for a total of four puny tails.  I miss getting oxtail.

  • Sad 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Shelby 

 

and they are Cow Tails , not Ox.

 

I lived in Spain for two years.

 

next to the Plaza de Toros 

 

there was a restaurant that featured Toro .

 

i had Toro Tail there once .  went w my father

 

my mother and sister declined joining us .

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Shelby said:

That sounds really good.

 

Oxtail used to be a cheap thing that I could get around here....not anymore.  Last time at the store it was like $17 for a total of four puny tails.  I miss getting oxtail.

The ethnic markets have more sane prices

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Oxtails were on sale for $4.99/lb at a local international market.  Not super cheap but not bad so that project should happen one of these days.  

 

In the meantime, here's another non-pâté:  Cascaron with Chicken Liver Mousse and Guava Jelly from Sheldon Simeon's Cook Real Hawai'i.   

EA0639F8-F4C3-4ECA-9983-CC2A386187D4_1_201_a.thumb.jpeg.22c46d3e654932fcbf61042a6e94cdd7.jpeg

In the header note, Sheldon says he wanted to serve a Hawaiian riff on a chicken liver mousse.  The mousse is super easy and made with sweet onion, miso and coconut milk, whiskey and hot sauce.  Flavorful but also very light.

The cascaron, on the other side, are on the heavy side compared with the crispy, dry toasts I usually have with chicken liver pâté.  They're fried coconut-mochi fritters with a hard outside crust and chewy, mochi-like interior.  Traditionally glazed in some sort of caramelized sugar syrup.  Per the recipe, instead of a glaze, the guava jelly (I used guava jam) is piped into the cascaron and served with the mousse and furikake.   I think it's probably easier to break them in half and top with the mousse, guava jelly and furikake to taste.   

I'd never pair these fritters with a heavier pâté but this actually works because the mousse is so light.  Not sure I need to make it again but it was fun to eat, playing with the different ingredients so each bite was a bit different.  

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...