Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Cook-Off #89: Pâtés and Terrines


Duvel
 Share

Recommended Posts

Pâtés & Terrines

 

What can be more inviting than a slice of a carefully balanced, well spiced and rich pâté, perhaps with a fresh tart side salad and a warm crusty bread? Well, you’ll soon be in for exactly that treat: welcome to eGullet Cook-Off #89 - Pâtés & Terrines! 

 

Although at first glance* a bit more technical & complex than our previous wings topic, it offers plenty of space to explore and experiment: from a simple pâté de campagne to a foie gras-centered pâté en croute with a delectable pasty shell and a jellied Sauterne cover. There has been a longstanding topic on terrines with spectacular entries in the past, so we felt it would be more than justified to open the topic up for a spirited exchange in the course of our popular Cook-Offs.

 

Typically something rather enjoyed in a restaurant setting (where these time-consuming, yet economical preparations have undergone a renaissance due to the nose-to-tail movement) or as a treat from your deli or traditional butcher, pâtés and terrines are surprisingly not difficult to prepare. They make – however – usually more than two servings, so maybe the upcoming Easter holidays could help to encourage you to give it a try and surprise your family and friends** …

 

There are many definitions of what makes a pâté a pâté, and how and why terrines are different. I am happy to discuss with you the intricacies of these, but for setting a non-threatening starting point I’d like to think of both as a fancy meatloaf or maybe an oversized sausage (in a funky rectangular shape perhaps) with interesting, maybe surprising additions (such as liver, offal, nuts, dried and alcohol-soaked fruits), herbs, liquors and spices (quatre épice anyone?). 
 

What kind of meat do you prefer? The world is your oyster, and beside all types of game, domestic animals, poultry and fowl, fish & seafood (including said oyster) can be used as well. Do you like a smooth texture or a coarser product, maybe with inlays ? You can shape your loaf into animal shapes, wrap it in bacon, fatback or puff pastry perhaps and glaze it with any gelled liquid you fancy. I can already see your minds starting to get creative …

 

B88598A4-7054-4636-ACA7-BA2D8A8EF245.jpeg

Rabbit terrine from the Rabbit Cook-Off.

 

So break out your books and magazines, peruse your favourite websites and maybe even show off tried & trusted family recipes and show us what you are capable of – if you can get ground meat and have an oven*** I’ll repeat my mantra: there is really no excuse this time 😊

 

CDF8D0BA-2676-41CB-911F-E853F0DCF0A2.thumb.jpeg.000aec8a4e3c82c543b14eed7faaa298.jpeg

 

See the complete eG Cook-Off Index here: https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/

 
—-

* well – having seen how much work can be put into a humble chicken wing, only at first glance. 

** they make a terrific presents as well.

*** or sous-vide setup, or …

Edited by Duvel (log)
  • Like 7
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really hadn't thought about how the nose-to-tail movement would help drive the revival of this sort of dish in restaurants. This will be fun and interesting!

  • Like 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did a quick search for “pate” recipes on my bookshelf of Eat Your Books….holy crap I have a mitt load of recipes.  Most are from Julia’s books, Silver Spoon, and French Regional cooking.  Lots of variations.  I suppose I could make a full recipe and gift portions to friends who I know like Pate.  A have a plethora of moulds which I have had for quite some time.

Thanks for the thread.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Out of sheer curiosity, I googled the chicken liver pate recipe I’ve used for years, from Epicurious. Though it made me sign in and offered me the opportunity to sign up, it DID give me the recipe.

 

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/bourbon-chicken-liver-pate-108720
 

Likewise, here’s Epicurious’ recipe for a damn fine pate de campagne.

 

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/country-pate-em-pate-de-campagne-em-350966

 

 

  • Like 4

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, kayb said:

Out of sheer curiosity, I googled the chicken liver pate recipe I’ve used for years, from Epicurious. Though it made me sign in and offered me the opportunity to sign up, it DID give me the recipe.

 

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/bourbon-chicken-liver-pate-108720
 

Likewise, here’s Epicurious’ recipe for a damn fine pate de campagne.

 

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/country-pate-em-pate-de-campagne-em-350966

 

 


So … which one will you make ? 😉

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For what its worth, the aforementioned chicken liver pâté is not so much a traditional pâté since the mixture is cooked, processed (finely mixed) and then put in a container whereas pâtés are typically cooked in a mold or vessel from raw.  That doesn't diminish the gustatory quality at all.  Chicken liver parfait however are cooked from raw in a jar or mold. A preparation that is cooked and then put in a mold or whatnot is generally called a terrine

 

To the French charcuterie purists, chicken liver pâté is commonly referred to as a "farce à gratin" which is either served on its own and billed as a "mousse" or incorporated into other forcemeats (country style pâté) as a binder.  I think of a bonafide pâté as a forcemeat varying in coarseness that is generally cooked in a mold, like the venerable "Country pâté".  "Pâté Grand-mère" (grandmother) is a thriftier version characterized by a higher amount of livers and stale bread.

 

My chicken liver spread consists of chicken livers marinated in gin, onions, button mushrooms, chicken fat, honey, sherry vinegar and spices.  I fill jars and then cover them chopped up pickles and confit gizzards (or tomatoes in the summer) and then a layer of aspic.

 

39188623444_258ef2cc22_c.thumb.jpg.198ecd08a89b758b0e08173e2709571c.jpg

 

45994656974_4a029dfeae_c.thumb.jpg.a3fae779d3ca74a7982e0395014d1354.jpg

 

 

  • Like 10
  • Thanks 6
  • Delicious 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Thanks, @Baron d'Apcher. So, you‘d make the distinction that pâtés are assembled raw and binding occurs via the cooking process, while terrines are assembled from already cooked ingredients and binding does happen via the gelatine-rich juices ?

Edited by Duvel (log)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't really participate. My friends are still in "fat fear land" and slip over for pastry. Just for me - not happenng.I can buy small amounts so that satisfies my itch.  I did Julia Child's pate de campagne a few times in my 20's for gatherings. Had to sub not too smoky bacon for the pork fat . My originak vessel has become a garden ornament. I don't know that nose to tail has had as much of an effect as the younger generation's embracing fat as part of a healthy normal eating style as shown by the now ubiquitous charcuterie platters in restaurants - I am coming from US observations. Lookn forward to seeing everyone's efforts. 

terrine.JPG

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Duvel said:

Thanks, @Baron d'Apcher. So, you‘d make the distinction that pâtés are assembled raw and binding occurs via the cooking process, while terrines are assembled from already cooked ingredients and binding does happen via the gelatine-rich juices ?

Correct.  To wit, terrines involve layers or vegetables or fish and more commonly braised beef shanks, chicken or ham (Jambon Persillé).

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Does creton count?


Truth to be told, I never had cretons. From what I have read so far it is softer & spreadable compared to a firm pâté; more similar to rillettes. But this is a Cook-Off and we want to embrace the topic in all its facets, so please show and teach us how to make your cretons, and we‘ll compare together 🤗

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/3/2022 at 3:52 PM, blue_dolphin said:

OK.  I've been thinking about using my Ninja Creami to make a Pacojet recipe for chicken liver paté.  

For some reason, it brings to mind Dan Aykroid's old Bass-o-matic sketch from SNL 🙃 but I think now is the time!

I like the look of that

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Didn't make any but I loved eating it in Lyon. Some inspiration for anyone who wants to give it a go.

 

M8Jl1Rk.jpg

 

E9pZqgs.jpg

 

JOnNPt8.jpg

 

OM4FMPc.jpg

 

P7VEOdn.jpg

 

:)

lEEzhzD.jpg

 

What about things like brawn and "headcheese"? I can't get enough of it in Germany. With Bratkartoffeln... hmm... German "Bauernleberwurst"/farmer's pate are equally delicious.

Edited by BonVivant (log)
  • Like 6
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

I'm in.  This is all new to me-- I've seen it and even eaten some.  I mean @Baron d'Apcher's creations are simply stunning.  I won't reach that level 🤣

 

I have the Charcuterie cookbook by Michael Ruhlman and Brian Polcyn.  I'm starting there.  I've picked out two recipes.  One involves venison that I'll have to find some ingredients for.  The other involves seafood and I think I have all of the ingredients here so I'll start with that one.

 

I wish I had some cool shaped molds, but I only have loaf pans.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, BonVivant said:

Didn't make any but I loved eating it in Lyon. Some inspiration for anyone who wants to give it a go.

E9pZqgs.jpg

 

What about things like brawn and "headcheese"? I can't get enough of it in Germany. With Bratkartoffeln... hmm... German "Bauernleberwurst"/farmer's pate are equally delicious.

 

That first image with the sausage alongside glistens like headcheese. So how does a Bauernwurst/farmers wurst differ fron a country pate?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pondering pistachios in a terrine. Do they soften up so much that cutting through them doesn't tear the terrine when cut by knife?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Pondering pistachios in a terrine. Do they soften up so much that cutting through them doesn't tear the terrine when cut by knife?

See them often so? I did not use them the couple tmes I made a country pate but that was before shelled ones were so accessible. (think pink). They sure add a pretty note and  contrast.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, Baron d'Apcher said:

Scour Ebay, tag sales and antique stores. Most of the shaped molds just aren't made that much anymore.

Kind of like the jello/gelatin molds of the past. Collectibles

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, heidih said:

 So how does a Bauernwurst/farmers wurst differ from a country pate?

Anything "wurst" is a sausage and there are quite a few varieties of Bauer. Bauerwurst is a coarse ground sausage, smaller than Bauernwurst, which is smoked pork & beef but I'm confident there are fluctuations by region, town, personality and temperament. Bauernleberwurst is invariably put in a casing raw and not much different than liverwurst, except that liverwurst has more liver and is generally eaten cold.

Headcheese qualifies as a terrine.  The parts of the head are cooked first, diced up and then put in a mold with some very gelatinous juices which makes it nice and firm.  Scrapple is also a sort of terrine.  Cooked parts of the head ground up with raw liver and then the paste is cooked with buckwheat or cornmeal until thick and left to cool in a mold.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, Baron d'Apcher said:

Anything "wurst" is a sausage and there are quite a few varieties of Bauer. Bauerwurst is a coarse ground sausage, smaller than Bauernwurst, which is smoked pork & beef but I'm confident there are fluctuations by region, town, personality and temperament. Bauernleberwurst is invariably put in a casing raw and not much different than liverwurst, except that liverwurst has more liver and is generally eaten cold.

Headcheese qualifies as a terrine.  The parts of the head are cooked first, diced up and then put in a mold with some very gelatinous juices which makes it nice and firm.  Scrapple is also a sort of terrine.  Cooked parts of the head ground up with raw liver and then the paste is cooked with buckwheat or cornmeal until thick and left to cool in a mold.

Scrapple!!! @rotuts Loves scrapple!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...