Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Steamed Bao Buns


JohnT
 Share

Recommended Posts

Does anybody have a tried and tested recipe for steamed Bao buns in English? I have tried a few recipes off the internet but, either I am not good at making them (highly possible) or the recipes I used are not too good. I have never seen a Bao bun, never mind them been made! And cannot find them offered in our local Chinese restaurants or would have asked for a recipe or lesson on making them.

  • Like 1

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

52 minutes ago, JohnT said:

cannot find them offered in our local Chinese restaurants

 

I'm not surprised. They aren't really a restaurant dish. I don't recall seeing them in a restaurant here in China, either. Most are home made or sold from steamed breakfast   street food snack joints, to go. They are also sold frozen in supermarkets.

I don't have a recipe in English other than the one in my head, sorry.

Also, remember that they come with many different fillings. The ones I make most often contain pork and shiitake, but that's just my preference. Here are just three.

1274989050_baozi3.thumb.jpg.70a0dec5b1473abb2da11c90478330d8.jpg

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do have a Chinese language cookbook aimed at home cooks. It has nine variations.

 

I'll translate / paraphrase the basics of the bun and leave the filling up to you. Give me till tomorrow.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@liuzhouThank you, it would be greatly appreciated.

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is my summary translation of the recipe for baozi dough in a Chinese language cookbook. As ever with these cookbooks, they do assume a bit of prior knowledge.

 

Dough Ingredients

 

Flour                  250 grams

ter                      135 grams

Instant Yeast         3 grams

White Sugar         10 grams

Vegetable Oil    1 Small Spoon

 

Mix all the ingredients for the dough and form into a soft ball. Place in a bowl, cover and leave in a warm place until it doubles in size.

 

In the meantime, prepare your filling of choice.

 

Take the double-sized dough, punch out the air and knead thoroughly. Roll out and cut into even bun-sized pieces. Roll each out into circles, making them thicker in the centre and thinner at the edges*. Press the wrappers to together and twist at the top, making sure they are fully sealed. Do not overfill.

 

Place into a lined steamer basket above a pot of water and cover with a lid, but do not apply heat yet. Leave the buns there 15 minutes to rest.

 

Turn heat to high. When the water is boiling, reduce heat to medium and steam for 15 minutes. Turn off heat, but do not remove the lid until five minutes later.

 

Serve.

 

* Chinese stores sell special tapered rolling pins to make this easier, but they are not essential.

 

Here are some guide pictures to give an idea of sizes. Pics 1, 5 and 6  are of the dough.

 

pics.thumb.jpg.7e8bb8bd82fa655a982f45c74fee153a.jpg

Edited by liuzhou
error (log)
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@liuzhouThanks for the recipe. I will give it a go, hopefully this next weekend, and do some pulled pork as a filling.

  • Like 2

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a recipe that my Mom made and passed onto me. I usual;ly fill these with Char Siu, or chicken, Chinese sausage and Shitaki Mushroom.

 

4 cups all purpose flour

3/4 cup sugar

1/2 tsp salt

4 TSP baking powder Mix well.

Add 2 cups MINUS 1 TBSP milk
Knead for 10 minutes. Add 2 TSP veg oil - Knead 10 minutes, then rest for 10 minutes.

 

Make into baos. Steam for 10 minutes, wipe off condensation inside lid, and steam for another 10 minutes.

OR my s-i-l's:

4 cups cake flour

1 1/4 cup milk

1 cup sugar

4 TSP baking powder

1 tsp salt.

Same process.

 

NOW, we use prepared bao flour from Asian supermarket

 

                                                                     1691219107_Goodflour6869.jpg.1b8ea5f89933016cabba96907e67bf6a.jpg

 

 

I made 3 doz Char Siu Baos yesterday


                                                                    356722586_CHarSiuBaos6873.jpg.af1d122ae60bcc985e1a7014e3ee96e4.jpg

 

 

 

 

  • Like 7
  • Delicious 1

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Dejah Many thanks for your recipe too. Something more for me to experiment with.

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would just add that it is very common in China to add a flour improver formulated specifically for steamed breads and buns etc.

 

Do you have a Chinatown in Capetown. I know Johannesburg does (I have a cousin living there). Amyway, they would proably have it.

 

If there is no English on the packaging, you can look for the characters 改良剂 or 改良劑 (both pronounced gǎi liáng jì, which means 'ímprovement agent'.

However, it isn't essential. I seldom use it.

 

H22011d59a57c41ec92ba9e6e02dfd1b8N.jpg.d9ebb6bd77c51996588932c1591bdb90.jpg

 

 

  • Like 1

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...