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Dulce de Leche shelf life


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I came across the simmer in the can recipe for dulce de leche, and cooked some up- yum! Wasn't sure if the moisture content was suitable for inside a chocolate, so I added chocolate to make a ganache, but it ended up quite stiff and not as flavourful. 

Question 1: Can i pipe it as is into chocolate shells and it'll keep well enough or is the water content too high?

Question 2: Can I simmer cans and then keep them on the shelf or in the fridge for future use?

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I've made the simmered in a can dulce de leche only once, but I'd be comfortable saying that it is shelf stable. In Grewelings book (page 167) he simmers the can for 4 hours, then has the mixture cool to room temp. He pipes it straight into the bonbon shell unaltered.

 

The book also includes this note: "When making the dulce de leche, be certain that the cans of sweetened condensed milk are fully immersed in the simmering water at all times to avoid the possibility of the cans bursting. The dulce de leche may be made days in advance if desired."

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is store bought really a comparable product to one you make yourself in terms of method of production? There's no reason a shelf stable store bought dulce de leche would need to have a low AW is there? Honest question, I am a chef not a pastry chef but on the surface of it they seem to me to be different products with different purposes.

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It's just a coincidence, but I measured the Aw of La Lechera canned dulce de leche a few days ago, and it was 0.75.  I never tried the submerged-can-in-water method because of what could go wrong, but I used David Lebovitz's recipe, which entails baking a little salt and cans of sweetened condensed milk in a container (not in the can) until it browns and thickens.  It was fine, but no better (to my taste) than La Lechera, and the baking time was prohibitive--it often took more than 3 hours at 400F/204C to thicken the stuff.  I could buy many cans of La Lechera for what the gas cost me to bake it myself.  I heat La Lechera's dulce (with some sea salt) to around 80F/27C, then pipe it into molds.  It pairs wonderfully with coffee ganache, and I just paired it with banana ganache.

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