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Wine Glasses, Eric Asimov, NYTimes


rotuts
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I hesitated mentioning this article :

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/27/dining/drinks/best-wine-glasses.html?action=click&algo=bandit-all-surfaces_filter_new_arm_10_1&alpha=0.05&block=trending_recirc&fellback=false&imp_id=405885839&impression_id=31f3191a-81e2-11ec-aaa8-ed200c0a53f9&index=1&pgtype=Article&pool=pool%2F91fcf81c-4fb0-49ff-bd57-a24647c85ea1&region=footer&req_id=650480765&surface=eos-most-popular-story&variant=1_bandit-all-surfaces_filter_new_arm_10_1

 

but not for long.  its a review of 5 current High end wine glasses.

 

I enjoy EA's writing , and have appreciated differences between wines he has reviewed , 

 

but will never taste.  He has balance , and decent style.

 

then , ooooops , off the deep end for the Targeted Swells of the NYTimes :

 

for review purposes :

 

merlin_200782503_7be27167-717a-4976-9b08-499071552142-superJumbo.thumb.jpg.9c53237d83545105b707d74b471190f8.jpg

 

"""  

Over most of the last decade the top glass among wine lovers was the Zalto Denk’Art Universal, which, when I first encountered it in 2011, seemed fundamentally different and radically better than the other leading glasses.

But in the last few years several other high-end glasses have been challenging Zalto’s supremacy, which brought me to these five lead-free crystal universal glasses, each precisely designed (and marketed) to be the only glass anybody would need to drink every sort of wine.

Anybody, that is, willing to pay the roughly $60 to $90 price per glass.

Most wine drinkers, admittedly, will neither want nor need such rarefied glasses. Many casual drinkers are happy these days to use inexpensive goblets or even stemless glasses, which I would not seek out, though I am happy enough on occasion to drink wine from a tumbler. ""

 

this glass :

 

27pour4-superJumbo.thumb.jpg.180a5309037c0af301829b591b6124e4.jpg

 

the Josephine.

 

got the antenna twitching :

 

""""    

The Josephine resembled the Zalto, with a significant difference: The bowl bulged slightly around the lowest part of its circumference as if it had a circular love handle before beginning to taper toward the rim, in a gentle arc rather than the Zalto’s straight line.

 

What’s the purpose of this unusual shape? “When the wine is agitated in the glass, the kink breaks this movement and allows the wine to flow back into the belly in a spiral motion,” a Josephinenhütte representative told me. “In doing so, it absorbs additional oxygen.” """"

 

drunk.jpeg.bf8e3dc883897035fd468aa77a6cffd7.jpeg

 

"  

The Jancis and the Gabriel-Glas were, to me, the most aesthetically appealing in shape and feel. I simply wanted them in my hands because they felt so good. But there was a discernible difference in the way the wines presented in these two glasses.

 

Whether sparkling, white or red, wines in these two glasses seemed slightly less focused, the flavors and aromas not quite as clear or as intense. The differences were subtle but apparent. ''  

 

my italics 

 

I smiled , fell off my chair  ( no decreeable damage done )

 

bingo   :  NYT Cognoscenti Hooked !

 

as they used to say in Ancient Greece :

 

( so Im told ) 

 

bar bar bar bar bar .

 

still,  fun article .

 

 

 

 

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I agree, fun article.
I like this sentence concerning the effect of the Conterno glass on younger reds: 

Quote

Such brutal honesty in a wine glass may be as welcome as a harshly lit bathroom mirror the morning after a rough night.

 

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11 hours ago, rotuts said:

I hesitated mentioning this article :

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/27/dining/drinks/best-wine-glasses.html?action=click&algo=bandit-all-surfaces_filter_new_arm_10_1&alpha=0.05&block=trending_recirc&fellback=false&imp_id=405885839&impression_id=31f3191a-81e2-11ec-aaa8-ed200c0a53f9&index=1&pgtype=Article&pool=pool%2F91fcf81c-4fb0-49ff-bd57-a24647c85ea1&region=footer&req_id=650480765&surface=eos-most-popular-story&variant=1_bandit-all-surfaces_filter_new_arm_10_1

 

but not for long.  its a review of 5 current High end wine glasses.

 

I enjoy EA's writing , and have appreciated differences between wines he has reviewed , 

 

but will never taste.  He has balance , and decent style.

 

then , ooooops , off the deep end for the Targeted Swells of the NYTimes :

 

for review purposes :

 

merlin_200782503_7be27167-717a-4976-9b08-499071552142-superJumbo.thumb.jpg.9c53237d83545105b707d74b471190f8.jpg

 

"""  

Over most of the last decade the top glass among wine lovers was the Zalto Denk’Art Universal, which, when I first encountered it in 2011, seemed fundamentally different and radically better than the other leading glasses.

But in the last few years several other high-end glasses have been challenging Zalto’s supremacy, which brought me to these five lead-free crystal universal glasses, each precisely designed (and marketed) to be the only glass anybody would need to drink every sort of wine.

Anybody, that is, willing to pay the roughly $60 to $90 price per glass.

Most wine drinkers, admittedly, will neither want nor need such rarefied glasses. Many casual drinkers are happy these days to use inexpensive goblets or even stemless glasses, which I would not seek out, though I am happy enough on occasion to drink wine from a tumbler. ""

 

this glass :

 

27pour4-superJumbo.thumb.jpg.180a5309037c0af301829b591b6124e4.jpg

 

the Josephine.

 

got the antenna twitching :

 

""""    

The Josephine resembled the Zalto, with a significant difference: The bowl bulged slightly around the lowest part of its circumference as if it had a circular love handle before beginning to taper toward the rim, in a gentle arc rather than the Zalto’s straight line.

 

What’s the purpose of this unusual shape? “When the wine is agitated in the glass, the kink breaks this movement and allows the wine to flow back into the belly in a spiral motion,” a Josephinenhütte representative told me. “In doing so, it absorbs additional oxygen.” """"

 

drunk.jpeg.bf8e3dc883897035fd468aa77a6cffd7.jpeg

 

"  

The Jancis and the Gabriel-Glas were, to me, the most aesthetically appealing in shape and feel. I simply wanted them in my hands because they felt so good. But there was a discernible difference in the way the wines presented in these two glasses.

 

Whether sparkling, white or red, wines in these two glasses seemed slightly less focused, the flavors and aromas not quite as clear or as intense. The differences were subtle but apparent. ''  

 

my italics 

 

I smiled , fell off my chair  ( no decreeable damage done )

 

bingo   :  NYT Cognoscenti Hooked !

 

as they used to say in Ancient Greece :

 

( so Im told ) 

 

bar bar bar bar bar .

 

still,  fun article .

 

 

 

 

 

Who in their right mind would spend less than $100 for a wine glass??

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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12 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Who in their right mind would spend less than $100 for a wine glass??

 

We are very fortunate to live in an area of conspicuous consumption and rapid depreciation.    Garage and moving sales have outfitted us with premium, signed, glasses that don't cause me angst at table or while washing up.    Usually around $1 or less apiece, as Henrys move on to the next mandatory purchase.    And as they trade up, so do we, albeit a year behind current trends   🤣.

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eGullet member #80.

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I'm with you, @Margaret Pilgrim. A dollar a glass is about right. I do have a few flea market glasses left from my college years, but most of the time I swear by my Ikea Svalka wine glasses. No need to wonder whether they are for red or white wines, because they are designed to be as average as possible. One glass for everything! For $5.99 a sixpack there's no angst involved. And, surprisingly, they don't break easily. Pre- Ikea I used Duralex French juice glasses for wine. Affected, but effective. If I need a weird thrill I use the gold-rimmed crystal glasses that I inherited from my MIL. When I hold them I feel like I'm on the Titanic. They are a lovely, restrained design and very elegant, but of course can't go in the dishwasher and therefore are a double threat: if your tipsy guests don't knock them over you can count on the back-up disaster when hand washing at midnight. So every once in a while when I think about it I just look at them and admire them and wonder whether if my nephew or my daughter will want anything to do with them. Currently they are both in the Tommy Tippy stage of "glassware" for their babies.

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one thing I do like in a wine glass :

 

a very thin lip at the rim.

 

my Baccarat has that.

 

exact same shape @ Crate&Barrel  did not.

 

$ 2.00 ?

 

to preserve the Baccart elegance , the C&B's were

 

used more often

 

now I very much favor :

 

71s6Fj9iEtL._AC_UL640_QL65_.jpg.11036b7dbf3599e4c4a8df7a69978e23.jpg

 

exceptionally stable!

 

tried these first :

 

51nbEv426QL._AC_UL640_QL65_.jpg.45e0bdd0829b58e1dd5d67be34eb3e8d.jpg

 

not so easy to hand wash.

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25 minutes ago, rotuts said:

one thing I do like in a wine glass :

 

a very thin lip at the rim.

 

my Baccarat has that.

 

exact same shape @ Crate&Barrel  did not.

 

$ 2.00 ?

 

to preserve the Baccart elegance , the C&B's were

 

used more often

 

now I very much favor :

 

71s6Fj9iEtL._AC_UL640_QL65_.jpg.11036b7dbf3599e4c4a8df7a69978e23.jpg

 

exceptionally stable!

 

tried these first :

 

51nbEv426QL._AC_UL640_QL65_.jpg.45e0bdd0829b58e1dd5d67be34eb3e8d.jpg

 

not so easy to hand wash.

 

People thought I was joking.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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In all seriousness: my palate is not able to differentiate between a proper and a semiproper oxygenated wine, so all functional aspects of the glass (including a fancy constriction and the like) are unfortunately lost for me. The insulation features from @rotuts post are also irrelevant, because I drink too fast.

 

Esthetics are always subject to ones preferences, but if it has a long stem, a decent bulge and a reasonable volume, it‘ll do for me. And the IKEA ones are doing the job for me as many of the ones pictured in the article. 
 

 

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the more I think about it

 

I wonder if that ' newer ' central angle is meaningful

 

I do think EA knows a lot about wine , and has been luck to

 

taste some delicious Humdingers

 

and more importantly , try several similar wines

 

at the same time.   that really sharpens your discerning skill.

 

but were the glasses tested ' blind '

 

ie same wine in each glass .  effective blindfold

 

the tasting .  would be easy to do .  move the glasses around

 

so you sent k ow which is whihc

 

only hold the stem , and use the other hand to

 

find the lip

 

etc.

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I like these, and pretty reasonable...

 

The One Wine Glass - Perfectly Designed Shaped Red Wine Glasses For All Types of Red Wine By Master Sommelier Andrea Robinson, Premium Set Of 2 Lead Free, Crystal Glasses, and Break Resistant (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

 

Like Eric, I can't abide by stemless wine glasses.  I'll drink the occasional plonk out of a

 

image.thumb.png.42ff9ed345b093a387c4dec5f41a70fd.png

 

Duralex tumbler, however.

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all I drink is plonk these days

 

and mighty fine plonk is is these days

 

from TJ's  :  no oak , dry , no benzene .

 

in insulated very very stable glass is

 

for Ice , my plonk stands right upito it 

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8 minutes ago, Duvel said:

In all seriousness: my palate is not able to differentiate between a proper and a semiproper oxygenated wine, so all functional aspects of the glass (including a fancy constriction and the like) are unfortunately lost for me. The insulation features from @rotuts post are also irrelevant, because I drink too fast.

 

Esthetics are always subject to ones preferences, but if it has a long stem, a decent bulge and a reasonable volume, it‘ll do for me. And the IKEA ones are doing the job for me as many of the ones pictured in the article. 
 

 

I remember a dinner at which I asked an accomplished wine guy if a particular glass was okay for him.   Without looking at it, he replied, "If it has a hole at the top, it'll work for me."

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thereis one think Id really like to know :

 

using a wine that had significant nuance :

 

and not knowing which glass what which while

 

tasting back and forth etc :

 

www.jpg.d425d288650a057649fe6ca3c2743930.jpg

 

would I , myself be able to tell any flavor differences between the angles

 

or curves at the bulge between these two ?

 

blind  ?  Honestly ?

 

both would have to have the same Lux fee; and very sharp thin rim

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I will personally maintain 

 

that using the two shapes above

 

if the surface area of the wine is the same in each glass

 

assuming the widest area 

 

the the newer design is just that

 

Newer .     like  Newer stuff ? or indeed,  it does look sort of

 

cooler than the rounded one .  you get that one .  or one of each

 

for Mood not wine.

 

but same wine , same wine experience w either glass.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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On 1/31/2022 at 7:30 AM, rotuts said:

no Weisswurst were having there 

@rotuts I believe Gerald Manley Hopkins wrote a gloomy poem on a similar theme. It was early morning. He descended to an empty kitchen and cried out:

 

'No wurst, there is none ...'

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1 hour ago, TdeV said:

DH has a bunch of Riedel glasses. One fascinating experiment is how differently a wine tastes poured into different glass shapes.

What were your findings?

 

To be honest, we have found that wine is situational.    Food pairings do affect taste judgments, but for us far more important is the place and time and company which can elevate or depress the perceived quality of a wine.   

 

That said, I do totally prefer a thin glass.   

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3 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

place and time and company

That's it. I've enjoyed a glass of nothing-special in a nothing-special glass. Nice glasses are nice but a very very small part of the occasion.

 

My favourite: drinking grapa from a coffee glass in the early morning with my almost father as we made liver sausage on the coldest day of winter.

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