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eG Cook-Off #88: Wings


Duvel
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2 hours ago, sartoric said:

an English website called The Curry Club

 

I still have the Curry Club cookbook from the 1980s. The late Pat Chapman was hugely influential in the UK curry world.

 

As to wings, about a month ago I had some Asian style wings from Christine Ha's (Blind Chef's) cookbook. “Recipes from My Home Kitchen (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)”. They were to die for.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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8 hours ago, heidih said:

I do but only from people in my "pod" and the broth/stock is only used by me. I have to do it on the down low as they find it horrifying.

I also used "gnawed" bones when I'm making my stock in the IP, though not when I'm simmering on the stovetop. It's always immediately after the meal, so if the chicken was food-safe to begin with (an assumption one makes, if one is to eat the damned thing) there's very little time for any pathogen to reproduce on the bones, and pressure-cooking will put the kibosh on that pretty quickly.

 

As far as the whole "been in someone's mouth" aspect of it goes, well...as pointed out in a previous discussion here, so have the forks in your drawer.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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26 minutes ago, chromedome said:

I also used "gnawed" bones when I'm making my stock in the IP, though not when I'm simmering on the stovetop. It's always immediately after the meal, so if the chicken was food-safe to begin with (an assumption one makes, if one is to eat the damned thing) there's very little time for any pathogen to reproduce on the bones, and pressure-cooking will put the kibosh on that pretty quickly.

 

As far as the whole "been in someone's mouth" aspect of it goes, well...as pointed out in a previous discussion here, so have the forks in your drawer.

 

I  hope you wash the forks thoroughly before putting them in the drawer.

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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5 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

I  hope you wash them thoroughly before putting them in the drawer.

Yes...like the chicken bones, they spend some time in very hot water first. :)

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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1 hour ago, chromedome said:

Yes...like the chicken bones, they spend some time in very hot water first. :)

 

So you cook chicken, have your people gnaw the bones and remove the good elements, collect the used bones, wash in "hot" water" then use them for stock? To what end? Bones have no flavour. Any chance they may have vestigal remains of actual flavour have been removed three times.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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I've been doing wings for my family more frequently during pandemic, just because it's a fun appetizer. Usually sweet & spicy, or sriracha-vinegar, baked in the oven. My husband's grandma makes a delicious stove top version - pan-fried, sweet soy, and loads of sliced ginger and whole garlic. Haven't made this in awhile, but will put it back in the rotation. 

 

I'd like to try a dry rub wing next, with maybe a Xinjiang spice mix.

 

Great Cook-Off topic - getting lots of fun ideas from everyone!

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16 minutes ago, Beebs said:

I've been doing wings for my family more frequently during pandemic, just because it's a fun appetizer. Usually sweet & spicy, or sriracha-vinegar, baked in the oven. My husband's grandma makes a delicious stove top version - pan-fried, sweet soy, and loads of sliced ginger and whole garlic. Haven't made this in awhile, but will put it back in the rotation. 

 

I'd like to try a dry rub wing next, with maybe a Xinjiang spice mix.

 

Great Cook-Off topic - getting lots of fun ideas from everyone!

 

Can you elaborate on your grandma's version?  I'm a big fan of ketjap manis.

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Just to get some ideas going. Wings I have done before.

 

dcarch

 

I like to make wings straight, for eating lollipop style, a lot less messy for a party.

1186933762_superbowlchickenwings.thumb.jpg.87270d81b6a3c895716500cf1dc93e0f.jpg

 

953331341_wingstomatoes2.thumb.jpg.f45d941f9f767e29abdafcd025187b1b.jpg

 

Boneless wings

1932828221_bonelesswingsfiddlehead.thumb.jpg.d3c43a41f51e2a83e0f69c48d0772d80.jpg

 

Stuffed wings

1925551599_stuffedwingsbokchoi.thumb.jpg.2286677917795c462625ef4609a2e9ee.jpg

 

Bacon fat fried wings (pigs have wings )1767200007_wingsbacon2.thumb.jpg.826b46dc2cadd094af6b5ff218479f2a.jpg 

 

Edited by dcarch (log)
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29 minutes ago, dcarch said:

Boneless wings

1932828221_bonelesswingsfiddlehead.thumb.jpg.d3c43a41f51e2a83e0f69c48d0772d80.jpg


How do you debone them ? Do you follow MCs protocol of SV, deboning and deep frying, or do you have any other technique to recommend ?

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

 

Can you elaborate on your grandma's version?  I'm a big fan of ketjap manis.

Unfortunately, I don't have a recipe for it and while my replication is tasty, it's not exactly the same. And also no measurements ha!

 

Marinate wings 30 mins or so in shaoxing wine, white pepper, bit of soy. Pan-fry till mostly cooked, and set aside. Slice a couple inches of ginger into planks, 6-8 cloves whole garlic, fry till brown. Add dark and light soy, a bit of shaoxing, rock sugar and cook till thickened. Add a bit of Chinese black vinegar and toasted sesame oil, throw in the wings, and cook till the sauce is very sticky and glazes the wings.

 

I might be missing a step or ingredient - hopefully not! If you don't have rock sugar, regular sugar is fine. But rock sugar will give it that nice, shiny glaze.

 

 

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50 minutes ago, Duvel said:


How do you debone them ? Do you follow MCs protocol of SV, deboning and deep frying, or do you have any other technique to recommend ?

 

There are many youtube videos on how to debone. I don't remember if I follow anyone completely. Most of the time I am just winging it.

 

dcarch (sorry^_^)

Edited by dcarch (log)
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6 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

So you cook chicken, have your people gnaw the bones and remove the good elements, collect the used bones, wash in "hot" water" then use them for stock? To what end? Bones have no flavour. Any chance they may have vestigal remains of actual flavour have been removed three times.

I was speaking figuratively. Forks get soaked in hot water, bones for stock get simmered in hot water...It didn't feel like *that* much of a stretch.

 

The full, explicit, non-figurative version goes like this:

 

Buy a chicken, and cook it (unless it's a rotisserie chicken, in which case that step gets skipped).

Eat some portion of the chicken. I strip the bones pretty aggressively, GF does not (and it's always just the two of us).

Debone the remaining part of the chicken, which typically leaves shreds of meat and all the cartilage in place, especially at the joints. I keep back the wingtips for this and the neck as well, if I have cooked the chicken myself, but not the giblets (cook's treat!).

Bung the bones - still well furnished for the most part, rather bare and gnawed in the case of those that had been on my plate - into the IP, with a bit of mirepoix, a bay leaf, some garlic, and a pinch of salt. Other herbs may or may not go in as well, depending on my plans for the resulting broth.

Push the button, walk away.

 

 

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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10 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

I still have the Curry Club cookbook from the 1980s. The late Pat Chapman was hugely influential in the UK curry world.

 

As to wings, about a month ago I had some Asian style wings from Christine Ha's (Blind Chef's) cookbook. “Recipes from My Home Kitchen (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)”. They were to die for.

I had that book too. This is different though - The Curry Club (Home Cooking). It started as a FB group and expanded to a website when the recipe files became too difficult to manage on FB. They also sell a few spices, spice mixes and cookware. 

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2 hours ago, Beebs said:

Unfortunately, I don't have a recipe for it and while my replication is tasty, it's not exactly the same. And also no measurements ha!

 

Marinate wings 30 mins or so in shaoxing wine, white pepper, bit of soy. Pan-fry till mostly cooked, and set aside. Slice a couple inches of ginger into planks, 6-8 cloves whole garlic, fry till brown. Add dark and light soy, a bit of shaoxing, rock sugar and cook till thickened. Add a bit of Chinese black vinegar and toasted sesame oil, throw in the wings, and cook till the sauce is very sticky and glazes the wings.

 

I might be missing a step or ingredient - hopefully not! If you don't have rock sugar, regular sugar is fine. But rock sugar will give it that nice, shiny glaze.

 

 

Thanks.  I "think" ketjap manis could replace the soy sauces and the rock sugar.

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On 1/14/2022 at 9:16 PM, heidih said:

@Duvel I remember he stuffed boneless wings being a thong in the  80's - usually in Vietnamese  restaurants and cookbooks.. I never tried - but  https://hot-thai-kitchen.com/stuffed-chicken-wings/


I am not sure if I would dare to debone the wing in its uncooked state - usually when I attempt to do something like this, the results look like Freddy Kruger met the poultry aisle of the supermarket. 
 

In my mind I always thought there must be a cheaters version, something along the lines of MCs „SV and then the bones basically slips out of it“. I haven’t tried it though, but I feel this Cook-Off is going to be the time …
 

 

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21 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Thanks.  I "think" ketjap manis could replace the soy sauces and the rock sugar.


I think with the ketjap manis you are going pretty much in the direction of ayam bakar. In fact, if you substitute the Chinese vinegar with tamarind, maybe galangal for ginger and add some coriander and you are basically there …

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8 minutes ago, Duvel said:


I think with the ketjap manis you are going pretty much in the direction of ayam bakar. In fact, if you substitute the Chinese vinegar with tamarind, maybe galangal for ginger and add some coriander and you are basically there …

There are tons of variations like this all over Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore.  I've currently got some wings marinating trying to replicate what I've had in Singapore - a hawker favorite...  so I'm starting with a rempah of garlic/ginger/shallot/sesame oil, mixed with light soy, sweet soy, oyster sauce, fish sauce, white pepper and some honey.  Smells really good so far...   I'm looking to get something resembling this:

IMG_4344.thumb.JPG.f7ecc6de3fdc26b57e345e5165ed7ea9.JPG

 

Unfortunately, I have to calamansi available - so I'll have to make due with standard US limes.

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23 minutes ago, KennethT said:

There are tons of variations like this all over Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore.  I've currently got some wings marinating trying to replicate what I've had in Singapore - a hawker favorite...  so I'm starting with a rempah of garlic/ginger/shallot/sesame oil, mixed with light soy, sweet soy, oyster sauce, fish sauce, white pepper and some honey.  Smells really good so far...   I'm looking to get something resembling this:

Unfortunately, I have to calamansi available - so I'll have to make due with standard US limes.

I wish I could ship you my old neighbor's calamansi bounty. Rained again today so the approach to trees is mush. As to flavor I would try just a hint of tangerine juice & zest mixed with the lime. Gets you closer to the floral of calamansi. Or kumquat.

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22 minutes ago, heidih said:

I wish I could ship you my old neighbor's calamansi bounty. Rained again today so the approach to trees is mush. As to flavor I would try just a hint of tangerine juice & zest mixed with the lime. Gets you closer to the floral of calamansi. Or kumquat.

It would almost easier for me to get calamansi than it would to get tangerine or kumquat!!!

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On 1/13/2022 at 9:57 PM, heidih said:

I do but only from people in my "pod" and the broth/stock is only used by me. I have to do it on the down low as they find it horrifying.

lol!

 

My family is quite used to it.  Whether I cut the chicken off the carcass or my little ones chew it off (I happily eat their leftovers anyways, no big deal - and no boil to 'sanitize' those scary little germs!!!)

 

For those with any unfounded fears, the iddy biddy germs will be all but gone after a good roiling boil.  And any that get through will only make your immunity stronger.

 

And not to mention that wings make some of the best stock! 

 

Also make sure to deglaze the roasting pan and add that to the pot as well.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, TicTac said:

For those with any unfounded fears, the iddy biddy germs will be all but gone after a good roiling boil.  And any that get through will only make your immunity stronger.

 

There is an expression in my dialect which I can't fish out of my brain right now - to paraphrase - we all end up eating "x" amount of dirt every year" Kinda like the "x" second rule on dropped food.

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