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eG Cook-Off #88: Wings


Duvel
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3 hours ago, heidih said:

I now I rag on Kenji a bit, but he does do his research/testing well. Thought his take on the crisp factor might inspire some of you.  https://www.seriouseats.com/the-best-buffalo-wings-oven-fried-wings-recipe

 

Kenji's method works pretty well. A variation of it is our go-to recipe:

 

For each pound of wings (we even use the tips, but that's a separate discussion), we make a mixture of 5 g each kosher salt and baking powder, toss the wings in it and let them sit for as much time as we can allow (minimum 1/2 hour). Then they get a dry rub, get put on a rack in a sheet pan and get roasted in a 450°F convection oven for 25 minutes. Then they're flipped, the oven goes down to 400° and they get roasted for another 25 minutes. The result is very crispy skin, with flavor coming from the rub. 

 

We've not found that the overnight rest Kenji prescribes makes much of a difference, although it sounds good in theory. Besides, we often don't know that we want wings that far in advance.

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Eat more chicken skin.

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I'm planning on making @Norm Matthews Korean-style wings, unless you were planning to, @Norm Matthews?  They are perfect for us because the spiciness is optional.  Mr. Kim and Jessica can blitz their tastebuds as much as they need to to impress one another and I can omit the spice and actually TASTE the wings and sauce from my first bite to my last.  

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I've never made wings, but I've found EverCrisp will maintain crispness till the end of time.

https://modernistpantry.com/products/evercrisp-breader-batter-boost.html

 

Modernistpantry.com ships world wide.

 

 

I just spent too much time looking at the Modernist Pantry site.  What I learned was if I spent $8.00 on Evercrisp the shipping would cost a bit over $28.  US funds so add another appx. 33%.  Sigh.

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58 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

I just spent too much time looking at the Modernist Pantry site.  What I learned was if I spent $8.00 on Evercrisp the shipping would cost a bit over $28.  US funds so add another appx. 33%.  Sigh.

 

There's a Canadian company (in Toronto, I think) called Powder for Texture. They don't have Evercrisp but they have something called Crisp Film. Can anyone say if it's the same or similar thing? 

https://www.powderfortexture.com/collections/ingredients/products/crisp-film-225-g

 

CRISP FILM® is a modified high amylose corn starch. It exhibits good film-forming characteristics and acts as a protective barrier when used as a coating for fried foods. These same characteristics also help in reducing oil pickup, increasing product crispiness and reducing moisture loss in deep fat fried (battered and breaded) foods. CRISP FILM® is commonly used to impart internal bonding strength and texture for formed potato, meat, and vegetable products.

 

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

 

I just spent too much time looking at the Modernist Pantry site.  What I learned was if I spent $8.00 on Evercrisp the shipping would cost a bit over $28.  US funds so add another appx. 33%.  Sigh.

 

Modernist Pantry is in Maine.  If the border is open* couldn't you just pop down to pick up a package?

 

*and you can find a recharging station

 

 

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Long time wing baker, new to grilling (top rack only) and never fried (unless dining out).

 

This house loves crispy wings, so it's always sauce on the side.

 

I have tried numerous methods that involved coatings of various sorts, but inevitably when baked, it is so tough to achieve a thin layer of whatever coating without it tasting like said coating (along with the off putting associated grainy texture).

 

A good salt and peppering and into a 400 degree oven to render out the fat. 

 

This topic got me thinking however about a slow braised wing, in an asian flavoured liquid - served over rice.  Certainly not crispy, but should melt in the mouth!

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1 hour ago, ElsieD said:

 

I just spent too much time looking at the Modernist Pantry site.  What I learned was if I spent $8.00 on Evercrisp the shipping would cost a bit over $28.  US funds so add another appx. 33%.  Sigh.

Amazon has evercrisp  and the Modernist stuff

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7 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Amazon has evercrisp  and the Modernist stuff

 

Amazon Canada does carry Evercrisp in a 113g size but it's $26 + $9 shipping as it comes from the US. And may not arrive until February. 

 

Powder for Texture (in Canada) is $10 for 225g for their Crisp Film plus about $13 shipping to Ottawa. ($20 shipping to my part of the country)

 

I think Crisp Film is actually trisol, which I think has similar properties to Evercrisp. 

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OK, a bit of research shows me that Evercrisp is just wheat dextrin, as per the packaging. Bob's Red Mill has a great description of how dextrin is derived and used. 

 

Trisol is sourced from wheat dextrin, according to Modernist Pantry, which sells it as well as Evercrisp. 

 

Quote

Trisol is a soluble fiber derived from wheat, especially recommended for the preparation of batters for frying and tempura. The result is a texture that remains crunchy for an extended time and prevents the absorption of oil. The recommended usage is 30% Trisol to 70% flour.

 

So for us Canadians who might not have easy or inexpensive access to Evercrisp, trisol looks to be a good alternative if we wanted to use something similar to crisp our wings.   🙂 

 

Unless anyone knows otherwise? I've never used either before, so I'm going by what I can find online.  

 

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1 hour ago, FauxPas said:

 

There's a Canadian company (in Toronto, I think) called Powder for Texture. They don't have Evercrisp but they have something called Crisp Film. Can anyone say if it's the same or similar thing? 

https://www.powderfortexture.com/collections/ingredients/products/crisp-film-225-g

 

CRISP FILM® is a modified high amylose corn starch. It exhibits good film-forming characteristics and acts as a protective barrier when used as a coating for fried foods. These same characteristics also help in reducing oil pickup, increasing product crispiness and reducing moisture loss in deep fat fried (battered and breaded) foods. CRISP FILM® is commonly used to impart internal bonding strength and texture for formed potato, meat, and vegetable products.

 

 

Thanks for this.  I checked it out and they charge $13 for shipping.  There used to be someone in Ottawa who sold modernists Cuisine products, I'm going to check with him to see 1) if he still does and 2) if not, will he sell me some of his stash.

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1 hour ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Modernist Pantry is in Maine.  If the border is open* couldn't you just pop down to pick up a package?

 

*and you can find a recharging station

 

 

 

Well, I'll just hope right over!  It's only 426 miles each way and Google informs me the trip will take 6 hours and 38 minutes each way.🙂

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@Duvel very nice lead-in to the challenge.  David Ross was one of my favorite eGullet members and it was quite a shock to learn of his passing.  Your doing him proud! 

 

I've been in a Mediterranean mood so tonight I roasted up some fresh wings that were marinated in meyer lemon juice, olive oil, marash chili flakes, salt, pepper and garlic.  I browned the chicken somewhat in the skillet then finished in a hot oven.  I would have liked to get a little more color on the wings but I did not want to overcook them.   The final dish was garnished with meyer lemon wedges and castelvetrano olives with a sprinkle of marash chilies and cyprus salt flakes.   

IMG_20220110_183410699_HDR.thumb.jpg.b7e15bb7229f5d65bbb4245cd1e5417b.jpg 

 

 

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I've never cooked wings (other than to make stock) but lovingly remember some wings I enjoyed in a Japanese style ramen place in China. The Chinese owners had lived in Japan for many years, but returned. Sadly, the man died and the wife retired about two years ago and I never got their recipe.

 

If anyone knows a Japanese treatment I'd love to hear it. Maybe it'll be close.

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9 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I've never cooked wings (other than to make stock) but lovingly remember some wings I enjoyed in a Japanese style ramen place in China. The Chinese owners had lived in Japan for many years, but returned. Sadly, the man died and the wife retired about two years ago and I never got their recipe.

 

If anyone knows a Japanese treatment I'd love to hear it. Maybe it'll be close.


In most Yakitori places I have visited, you can get your chicken wing (“tebasaki”) in two versions: shio (salt) or tare (sauce, similar to teriyaki sauce).

 

The treatment is quite similar. You skewer the whole wing or parts (flats are quite popular, 2 per skewer) and grill them over medium heat on the skin side until golden brown. It will shrink and fat will render out. Then flip and grill the other side; each side will take about 2 min. By this time, the wing is about 80% done and begins to show tiny charred spots. This is desirable.

 

Then you either spray/brush liberally the wing with sake (especially the meat side) and sprinkle with sea salt for the shio treatment, or dip into an everlasting cup of tare (similar to Chinese lu shui this get replenished, but never replaced) for tare treatment. 
 

Then you grill for maybe 20 sec more on each side just to recrisp the surface. The shio one would be served with a sprinkling of shichimi togarashi, the tare version as is or maybe with some sesame seeds.

 

In many Izakaya’s wings (again flats are preferred) would also be coated with salt & cornstarch, deep fried and then tossed in a reduced 2:1:1 soy/mirin (or honey, syrup)/sake mixture and sprinkled with sesame seeds before serving.

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15 hours ago, Dave the Cook said:

For each pound of wings (we even use the tips, but that's a separate discussion), we make a mixture of 5 g each kosher salt and baking powder, toss the wings in it and let them sit for as much time as we can allow (minimum 1/2 hour). Then they get a dry rub, get put on a rack in a sheet pan and get roasted in a 450°F convection oven for 25 minutes. Then they're flipped, the oven goes down to 400° and they get roasted for another 25 minutes. The result is very crispy skin, with flavor coming from the rub. 


This is pretty much my go-to method as well. I use slightly higher initial temperatures (250 oC) for about 10 min, then reduce. I have a rack of wings drying in the fridge right now to be baked for tonight’s Peruvian chicken wings …

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Dashed into the grocery store yesterday in the big city.  Not too many people in there and we wore our KN95's.  Got to the chicken section and these were the only brand of wings available.

 

thumbnail_IMG_1752.jpg.e3efbf8c0b035abde64bc576896389f5.jpg

 

3.99 a lb. is ridiculously expensive in our opinion.  Ronnie remembers buying wings for around sixty five cents a lb. when they were on sale and around 95 cents a pound when regularly priced.  Needless to say, these didn't end up in our cart lol.

 

I have some wings frozen in the downstairs freezer and because of this topic, and the big game last night, I unearthed some--I think I have one more package left.

 

Nothing earthshattering about my method.

 

Soak in buttermilk

 

thumbnail_IMG_1753.jpg.225b5046d878f8f8c6fd6c813f8c00e3.jpg

 

Then toss in a bag of flour seasoned with Lawry's salt and lots of black pepper

 

thumbnail_IMG_1754.jpg.3b72c2758275da21c44456fcc6bd15ac.jpg

 

Shallow fry in cast iron (forgot to take a picture)

 

We wanted the classic hot wings so I took some of this sauce that our friend gifted us and mixed it with melted butter

 

thumbnail_IMG_1758.jpg.3f832889d10797ff58284fa4e3e52952.jpg

 

And tossed the wings in it

 

thumbnail_IMG_1755.jpg.9b63b536d493760ae506aded5eb81e26.jpg

 

Blue cheese dressing on the side :) 

 

 

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33 minutes ago, Shelby said:

Shallow fry in cast iron (forgot to take a picture)

 

Aaaaaaahh ... so you want to keep your frying secrets 😝

 

Great wings !!

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53 minutes ago, btbyrd said:

I'd never seen that brand of chicken before a few days ago. I'd also never seen carrageenan in raw chicken before. $3.99/lb is too much, especially when 15% of it is dreck.

 

I bought a whole Heritage chicken a few weeks ago because my wife wanted roast chicken for dinner and that was the only choice. That thing was beat up. Leg broken and terrible quality.  I felt sorry for that chicken. Never again.  

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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Local Asian supermarket has a "special" for 2 lbs of wing flats (they call it "middle wing") for $6.99. Prices are indeed inflated at the moment. I know I used to pay 99 cents/lb on sale.

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3 hours ago, Shelby said:

3.99 a lb. is ridiculously expensive in our opinion.

I’d leap at such a bargain! $6.99/lb here!

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21 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I'm planning on making @Norm Matthews Korean-style wings, unless you were planning to, @Norm Matthews?  They are perfect for us because the spiciness is optional.  Mr. Kim and Jessica can blitz their tastebuds as much as they need to to impress one another and I can omit the spice and actually TASTE the wings and sauce from my first bite to my last.  

Feel free to use the recipe and good luck with the cook-off.

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