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Dinner 2022


liuzhou
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I've been remiss in posting for various reasons, interesting and otherwise.

 

I finally shucked the oysters I bought for NYE. That platter is 16" wide.

 

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Today I harvested the last produce of 2021 or the first of 2022 depending one the scorekeeper's interpretation of the calendar. All brassicas, red vein kale, nth generation of broccoli side shoots with leaves and the smallest Brussels sprouts I've ever seen. They ranged from the size of peas to the size of acorns.

 

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I sauted them with our garlic, olive oil and butter.

 

There will be no more until I replant. I pulled the plants out so I could put the garden to bed under a blanket of tarps before it snows tonight.

 

Served with a bone in strip steak (SV 4 hours at 123F and seared in a ACIFP at 700F on the Elda) smothered in red wine mushroom sauce.

 

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I was going to have air fried french fries but a large Manhattan got in my way.

 

 

 

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On 1/5/2022 at 6:32 AM, weinoo said:

 

Is this similar to what we see in restaurants as the classic dim sum dish, pai gwat, which are evidently steamed?

If so, do you have an IP recipe?

 

I worked for a woman, in my second or third job out of college in Silicon Valley, and she would bring these in for lunch; they were awesome.  Her recipe included, if my memory serves me correctly (ha!), dried bamboo shoots, as well as the technique of blanching the ribs first.

I use the IP when I am in a hurry; otherwise, it'd take about an hour to get the ribs as tender as I'd like. The method is basically the same as at dim sum, except maybe the bit of cornstarch I rub onto the ribs before cooking. The black beans I use have dried ginger mixed in.
I just soak the black beans to soften them a bit, season with salt, pepper, a bit of oil, a bit of soy, and the cornstarch. That's all.

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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By the time I get up at 7 am , temperature will be -39C with windchill of -50! It was only slightly warmer last night!
So I used all forms of extra heat in the house:

Re-purposed roast turkey breast a couple of days ago into Curry Turkey Pot Pie:

 

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Eaten with roasted beets, salad, and steamed-to-death broccoli (hubby likes his veg well done! :-()
                             

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Picked up a couple of pork butt steaks on sale. Brushed with Sesame Ginger dressing and coated with fine Panko crumbs. Started on the stove, and finished in the oven with roasted sweet potatoes

 

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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5 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

Shucking oysters is a skill I would love to learn. 

 

Only one way to learn...buy a proper oyster knife, some oysters, and go to it. I'm pretty sure youtube is your friend for this task.

 

Last night, the last of the Pèrigord truffle...

 

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Stored with the eggs used to make Brouillade aux truffes; the truffle grated both into and atop the brouillade. Served with warm baguette and French butter.

 

And the last of the Jidori chicken...

 

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Made this outstanding chicken soup. Stock made from the roasted carcass of said bird, along with bits and scraps.

 

Edited by weinoo (log)
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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Got the grinder out yesterday and ground up a bunch of venison for the freezer.  Feels good to be stocked up again.

 

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Kept a couple gallon ziplocks full of ground meat in the fridge.  Made stroganoff last night....thinking of playing around and making some bologna...or gyro meat with some.  Meatballs will be made with the rest.  Have to go to the doctor AGAIN today--this will give me something to look forward to when I get home.  Hopefully this visit is quick and painless.

 

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Chicken katzu, fried rice and cucumbers.  I filled my plate last so I got all the end pieces of chicken and only five cucumber slices.   I actually like the end pieces because they have extra crunchy coating on them.  I would have liked a few more cucumbers though.  You snooze you lose in this house.  🤣

 

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@MetsFan5 

 

@weinoo is not quite correct :

 

first thing you do is buy a good quality 

 

Steel Mesh glove.

 

i know of two people that lost at least 

 

1/2 of their arm to infection , that was difficult to treat.

 

not MRSA , something much more unusual.

 

then proceed as @weinoo 

 

suggests.

 

or buy them fresh shucked.

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6 minutes ago, rotuts said:

or buy them fresh shucked

Having done both I much recommend buying them. If you do get a chance at the fresh, make sure you have somebody show you first hand how to do it. It's not a game for amateurs. And do buy the glove.

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6 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

Shucking oysters is a skill I would love to learn. 

As @weinoo suggests, a good oyster knife is important. A wimpy oyster knife is an accident waiting to happen. And of course there are probably a million how-to videos out there, so watch at least a few.  I will add one more piece of advice: start small. That is, small oysters are easier to open. Big ones work out in the gym and can have very strong muscles. Don't rush. Make sure you have an absorbent bar mop to wrap the oyster and prevent sliding and slipping. So delicious! 

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I love shucking oysters but did feel intimidated for a long time. It isn't actually that difficult but you do need the right tools. A decent oyster knife, a glove and a steady hand. Then there are three things you can do.

 

1) Practice

2) Practice

3) Practice

 

Like any other skill. I can think of many things in the kitchen that are much more difficult. Opening the can of tomatoes I used tonight was way more difficult than opening an oyster!

 

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@weinoo is not quite correct :

 

first thing you do is buy a good quality 

 

Steel Mesh glove.

 

I can understand your concern for those just learning.  I use a folded towel (not a really nice one) and another towel underneath, but no glove. It takes away too much dexterity for me.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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14 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

Shucking oysters is a skill I would love to learn. 

 

A good oyster knife and a pair of silicone cut resistant gloves are a requirement. Neither need be expensive. Other than that, an understanding of bivalve Mollusk's hinge anatomy. If that fails you, YT is your friend.

 

I couldn't make a living shucking oysters but I don't have to 😄.

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17 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

Shucking oysters is a skill I would love to llearn.

If you can, chill them to about 28F. They won't freeze at that temperature but they can't put up much of a fight.

Edited by Wait. Wot
missing "y (log)
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My NY resolution is to love myself more.  Which means treating myself and family to gourmet food.  And to post it on eGullet which I have not done for a while.  Dining solo tonight.  These two scallops were 1/3 of a pound.  I have no butter in the house 😳.  That needs to be fixed ASAP.  Meanwhile scallops were sautéed in the mixture of olive oil and duck fat.  The skillet was deglazed and the cook was rewarded with lovely dry Riesling.  
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2 minutes ago, chefmd said:

My NY resolution is to love myself more.  Which means treating myself and family to gourmet food.  And to post it on eGullet which I have not done for a while.  Dining solo tonight.  These two scallops were 1/3 of a pound.  I have no butter in the house 😳.  That needs to be fixed ASAP.  Meanwhile scallops were sautéed in the mixture of olive oil and duck fat.  The skillet was deglazed and the cook was rewarded with lovely dry Riesling.  
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I love your resolution.  Good for you!!!!!  You are SO worth it.  And I am thrilled you will be here more :) 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Shelby said:

PS. Your scallops look perfectly cooked.

 

 I just told Ronnie I need to order some scallops .....he didn't agree lol.....too much in the freezer as it is ....

I am lucky to live in Northern Virginia.  I can go to a fancy store and buy two scallops.  I envy your freezer with all that venison and such

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3 hours ago, Wait. Wot said:

If you can, chill them to about 28F. They won't freeze at that temperature but they can't put up much of a fight.

INTERESTING!    Does this really work?    If so, I am eternally indebted!

eGullet member #80.

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Hamburger & Onions with mushroom gravy, mashed taters and peas.

                     

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Dejah

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6 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

INTERESTING!    Does this really work?    If so, I am eternally indebted!


I have been told previously it does actually help. 
  I am super clumsy so all the advice is appreciated. And I prefer west coast oysters which are smaller but also harder to source on the east coast. 

Also, how does one know of an oyster is “bad”? Clams are obvious when cooked but personally I don’t know if I could determine a good raw clam or oyster from a “bad” one and that makes me nervous. 
 

Once/if/when covid rates in NJ stop breaking records I’d like to go to a local seafood restaurant and see if they’d allow me to “help” prep during the day. 

Edited by MetsFan5 (log)
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