Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Dinner 2022


liuzhou
 Share

Recommended Posts

@gfweb – your meatloaf sounds really good.  And it looks perfectly cohesive.  I have issues with that, so I’m always super impressed when I see a meatloaf that actually stays together.  Also – your schnitzel is beautifully coated!

 

@btbyrd – Happy Anniversary!  Great meals! 

 

@Annie_H – Wonderful lobster meal.  I honestly don’t think there is a better summer meal than corn and some kind of shellfish!

 

Wednesday night was an ATK recipe for Orange-Miso Glazed Salmon along with some leftover angel hair pasta seasoned with ponzu, soy sauce, garlic, and parsley:

1-IMG_0340.jpg.4cea23afb56f03d9baf31c1f837b4c92.jpg

I wouldn’t exactly call it a “glaze” as I think of a glaze as being translucent, but it tasted great – Jessica has even been eating the leftovers cold.  I think it was the miso that muddied it.  I’m not even completely sure that I did it all correctly.  It is one of those recipes where they give you the basic recipe and then a bunch of options.  The basic recipe was for glazed salmon and the orange-miso was an option.  So, I may have glazed it twice 🤪. Served with a simple romaine and cucumber salad w/ the delicious ranch dressing that Jessica got from Libby Hill Restaurant while we were in NC last week:

1-IMG_0339.jpg.dc6e52b0137e97430439c4cdd179c2d4.jpg

Libby Hill is a seafood restaurant that has been in the town where my grandparents lived for almost 50 years.  Oddly enough, this little town manages to support TWO classic seafood places and has for years.  There are only four locations left now, all in NC, but there used to be more.  We love their old-school fried options and they have the best ranch dressing we’ve ever had (and I am not a Ranch person) – don’t know if it is house made or a mix or what, but it’s truly salad enhancing!

 

Last night was my vegetable soup, some leftover cheese fondue, and some of a fresh baguette:

1-IMG_0347.jpg.ea1df2f24d4b2ba3b160e1d299628d85.jpg

 

  • Like 10
  • Delicious 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wednesday night after a FreshDirect delivery I made a home smoked sausage puttanesca trying some new-to-me pastas. With an overcooked semi-succotash. Missing fresh tomato and zucchini. Good enough. Added Persian cukes and fresh beans to the table. 

RG white limas were a good choice. 

DH always gets a heftier plating than mine. Hard to judge his appetite. 

Screen Shot 2022-08-04 at 9.32.00 AM.jpeg

Screen Shot 2022-08-04 at 9.38.55 AM.png

  • Like 11
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last of the grilled ribs. Last nights dinner was a beef rib sandwich served southern style.  Actually southern style is two or three pork ribs sandwiched between two slices of white bread.  I could never figure that one out as as kid but it's the equivalent of a Scotch egg or pastie.  Meal in-hand.   My meal in-hand included lots of sauce and a Sweetwater 420.

IMG_20220804_225133588.thumb.jpg.7e325be528fed435a2e18755c179b013.jpg

 

And tonight's rib sendoff is serendipity soup prepared with the aid of my oscillating multi-tool.  I sectioned the rib with no drama (or splinters) and combined with chicken stock for a Pho'ish type soup.  I had some really nice mushrooms that I sweated down and added prior to serving.

IMG_20220805_185005136.thumb.jpg.d6cae74f72d11bafb9fe30df22a027dc.jpg 

 

IMG_20220805_194120113.thumb.jpg.72842f0ed2b1b776047d833dcfc72cdf.jpg

Edited by Steve Irby (log)
  • Like 14
  • Delicious 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Steve Irby said:

The last of the grilled ribs. Last nights dinner was a beef rib sandwich served southern style.  Actually southern style is two or three pork ribs sandwiched between two slices of white bread.  I could never figure that one out as as kid but it's the equivalent of a Scottish egg or pastie.  Meal in-hand.   My meal in-hand included lots of sauce and a Sweetwater 420.

IMG_20220804_225133588.thumb.jpg.7e325be528fed435a2e18755c179b013.jpg

 

And tonight's rib sendoff is serendipity soup prepared with the aid of my oscillating multi-tool.  I sectioned the rib with no drama (or splinters) and combined with chicken stock for a Pho'ish type soup.  I had some really nice mushrooms that I sweated down and added prior to serving.

IMG_20220805_185005136.thumb.jpg.d6cae74f72d11bafb9fe30df22a027dc.jpg 

 

IMG_20220805_194120113.thumb.jpg.72842f0ed2b1b776047d833dcfc72cdf.jpg

 

Could you explain the oscillating multi-tool?  It does not appear to be a culinary implement.

 

Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pizza night.

 

Dough was made early yesterday morning and went into the fridge for a cold fermentation and Matt took it out around noon today.

Ready to use by the time I got home from work.

Divided into two balls , one slightly larger for Matt's pizza.

880490020_HomemadeItalianSausageandmushroompizzaAugust5th20221.thumb.jpg.d924fc07cba64430ae7dfd6368936993.jpg

 

I made some homemade Italian sausage and fried some up for a sausage and mushroom pizza.

98285310_HomemadeItalianSausageandmushroompizzaAugust5th2022.thumb.jpg.71785638e4859118ca8385071317b50b.jpg

Baked in the Ooni.

1490771055_MattsVegetarianPizzaAugust5th20221.thumb.jpg.40de74922a3402c6f45b967d448deb8a.jpg

 

 

Matt is a vegetarian so he made his own, topped with three cheeses,

2110338634_MattsVegetarianPizzaAugust5th2022.thumb.jpg.762d5628fb15905de860ebfc1f357e28.jpg

vegetarian pepperoni and bacon, jalapeno peppers and green olives. He baked his at 550°F on the stone in the conventional oven.

  • Like 13
  • Delicious 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Steve Irby said:

equivalent of a Scottish egg

 

Scotch eggs are not Scottish. They are English. The word 'scotch' in the name is not a reference to Scotland but another word, meaning to chop or cut and refers to the coating of the egg which is finely minced (chopped).

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Raffetto's comes in handy when it's really too annoyingly hot to cook...

 

326741754_Ravioli08-05-22.thumb.jpeg.ce100fa3fd5daea01dc78a7f569ce5fe.jpeg

 

Raffetto's Ravioli finished in a pan with a bit of leftover saffron stock, butter, herbs, Parmigiano Reggiano. 

 

image.thumb.jpeg.9d891769acb117759071f678042c9b7e.jpeg

 

image.thumb.jpeg.b06b521ffb0cf639e373a0c8bb484160.jpeg

 

Steamed broccoli dressed with olive oil, dill, garlic, chili flakes, s & p, lemon.

 

  • Like 13
  • Delicious 1

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Could you explain the oscillating multi-tool?  It does not appear to be a culinary implement.

 

It's not a culinary implement but it certainly lives up to it's multi-tool billing at our house.  The tool operates  by oscillating the blade through a small arc at up to 20,000 OPM.  The material being cut needs to be hard and you use a light pressure to advance the tool.  Too much pressure and the oscillating motion is transferred into the work piece or tool.  It works beautifully on  small meat cuts as the meat doesn't slide on the table and the bone meal is greatly reduced.  I have a meat saw and sawzall that I use on larger primas but this has worked well on ham bones, chicken, and pork shoulders

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

Scotch eggs are not Scottish. They are English. The word 'scotch' in the name is not a reference to Scotland but another word, meaning to chop or cut and refers to the coating of the egg which is finely minced (chopped).

Thanks, I stand corrected! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Steve Irby said:

It's not a culinary implement but it certainly lives up to it's multi-tool billing at our house.  The tool operates  by oscillating the blade through a small arc at up to 20,000 OPM.  The material being cut needs to be hard and you use a light pressure to advance the tool.  Too much pressure and the oscillating motion is transferred into the work piece or tool.  It works beautifully on  small meat cuts as the meat doesn't slide on the table and the bone meal is greatly reduced.  I have a meat saw and sawzall that I use on larger primas but this has worked well on ham bones, chicken, and pork shoulders

How do you wash it?  I know the blade is removable, but sometimes gunk gets everywhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, KennethT said:

How do you wash it?  I know the blade is removable, but sometimes gunk gets everywhere.

If it's going to get messy I use plastic film over the blade holder.  If it's going to get real messy I use my meat saw! If I'm sectioning a bone for soup (or dog treat) I don't fool with the film.

IMG_20220806_103617262_HDR.thumb.jpg.52beda2de68e648797d2c16b48d7667d.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, Steve Irby said:

If it's going to get messy I use plastic film over the blade holder.  If it's going to get real messy I use my meat saw! If I'm sectioning a bone for soup (or dog treat) I don't fool with the film.

IMG_20220806_103617262_HDR.thumb.jpg.52beda2de68e648797d2c16b48d7667d.jpg

Cool. One of those was among the tools I inherited from my father, and I hadn't (yet) thought of using it on foods.

  • Like 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Steve Irby said:

If it's going to get messy I use plastic film over the blade holder.  If it's going to get real messy I use my meat saw! If I'm sectioning a bone for soup (or dog treat) I don't fool with the film.

IMG_20220806_103617262_HDR.thumb.jpg.52beda2de68e648797d2c16b48d7667d.jpg

huh. I never thought of wrapping it in plastic wrap.  Simple - I like it!  One final question - how do you use it so it doesn't tear up your cutting board as you cut through the meat?  Do you freeze the meat first or does it not matter?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, KennethT said:

huh. I never thought of wrapping it in plastic wrap.  Simple - I like it!  One final question - how do you use it so it doesn't tear up your cutting board as you cut through the meat?  Do you freeze the meat first or does it not matter?

I only use it for cutting hard material such as bone, drywall, lumber, pvc pipe, etc.  In the kitchen the bone is cut after the meat is trimmed back.  In the case of the beef ribs you just plunge cut through the silver skin side and finish the meat portion with your knife.  There is little chance of cutting yourself as you can press the blade (20 TPI bimetal) against your skin without injury.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, Steve Irby said:

I only use it for cutting hard material such as bone, drywall, lumber, pvc pipe, etc.  In the kitchen the bone is cut after the meat is trimmed back.  In the case of the beef ribs you just plunge cut through the silver skin side and finish the meat portion with your knife.  There is little chance of cutting yourself as you can press the blade (20 TPI bimetal) against your skin without injury.  

Thanks - yeah, I have one of them also (a cheap Harbor Freight special) but never thought to use it in the kitchen.  As @Steve Irbysays, as tools go, it's one of the safer ones out there.  Definitely much safer than a reciprocating Sawzall!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

Scotch eggs are not Scottish. They are English. The word 'scotch' in the name is not a reference to Scotland but another word, meaning to chop or cut and refers to the coating of the egg which is finely minced (chopped).


Regardless of their provenance, they’re wonderful.

  • Like 1

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Thanks - yeah, I have one of them also (a cheap Harbor Freight special) but never thought to use it in the kitchen.  As @Steve Irbysays, as tools go, it's one of the safer ones out there.  Definitely much safer than a reciprocating Sawzall!

 

Safer? Way safer!

 

I bought a big pork butt from ShopRite this morning ($1.24 lb), making pork and peanuts. Too big for the pot, so I used my table saw with a 10" carbide blade. It took about two seconds per cut through the big bone. So the big butt is in three pieces in the pot. 

 

Messy and dangerous. Please do not do it my way.

 

dcarch

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Harbor Freight rules. All the men in my area were in love. I have been there - for the free stuff.. I didn't realize how national it was. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...