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Dinner 2022


liuzhou
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46 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I don't know what day your order window opens but mine is Sunday and they had them available again.

Thanks!. I will be ordering again if they still have them. I order every 12-14 days and that will be this next weekend. I have a nice half full crisper drawer now. I like the challenge using what I have before a re-stock. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Annie_H said:

What is missing in the look of them?. The red food coloring?. It isn't necessary for the flavor. I know some red is from bugs but most is probably from petroleum or such creations. 

 

Absolutely nothing to do with red food colouring. That would make them look even less Asian. I've never seen that used on ribs anywhere in East or S.E. Asia.

 

What I noticed was the size of the pieces. They would normally be bite-sized here - half the size of those at the forefront of Norm's picture. We use chopsticks!

 

IMG_0061.jpg

 

But what clinched it for me was that they appear to be sprinkled with sesame seeds, a peculiar western practice to make dishes look Asian. It rarely happens here.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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@Norm Matthews 

 

your ribs look perfect .

 

local heat got me thinking

 

( oddly )

 

would they be delicious @ room temp

 

with an Iced Cold Beer ?

 

[ed.: ICB :  tall glass , 1/4 to 1/2 " Beer Slush @ the rim ]

Edited by rotuts (log)
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21 hours ago, Anna N said:

Can you say more about this? I am a huge fan of the air fryer but not necessarily of boneless, skinless chicken breasts. I think they are one of the hardest things to cook so

as to make them edible. Looks as if you have found the secret. Thanks. 

cut into small 1-1/4" (3.175cm) chunks. seasoned with salt, pepper, garlic powder, smoked paprika. Olive oil.

Cooked at Air fry 390F degrees for 14 minutes turning once.

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22 hours ago, Anna N said:

I am a huge fan of the air fryer but not necessarily of boneless, skinless chicken breasts. I think they are one of the hardest things to cook so

as to make them edible.

 

The least flavourful part of the bird. I prefer the feet!

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Kimchi miso glazed and roasted Frenched chicken legs. Last few packages of legs were 3 per pack. This was 4. Same weight. I prefer the smaller ones but frenching 12 pushed my buttons a bit. Solid no-go will I ever do this for a party. Poor-low-on-the-ladder employee that has to do this every day. 

Roasted vegetables and rice balls. 

The kimchi is not something I would buy at the price it is selling for but Misfits sent it as a freebie by mistake. Odd gifted condiments get lost in my pantry usually. I kept it front and center and it is really good. 

I added hibiscus, beet root, and amchur powders for zip and color.

 

 

Screen Shot 2022-07-20 at 8.55.35 AM.jpeg

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Artichoke lasagne   (artichoke bruschetta incorporated into bechemel)  +  (no boil lasagne noodles) = 10 minute prep before baking.   

1949474008_ScreenShot2022-07-20at6_22_28PM.png.51e76eb907175eb32f9efcd7970813e8.png

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I made this previously with homemade lasagne noodles and artichoke bruschetta made from several pounds of fresh baby artichokes.   It was divine.   But this was its equal with 10% of the effort.

Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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36 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Artichoke lasagne   (artichoke bruschetta incorporated into bechemel)  +  (no boil lasagne noodles) = 10 minute prep before baking.   

1949474008_ScreenShot2022-07-20at6_22_28PM.png.51e76eb907175eb32f9efcd7970813e8.png

1688227501_ScreenShot2022-07-20at6_22_46PM.png.493caa98e48698b9028d15896138ea98.png

 

I made this previously with homemade lasagne noodles and artichoke bruschetta made from several pounds of fresh baby artichokes.   It was divine.   But this was its equal with 10% of the effort.

So canned/jarred a-chokes? My friends and I were very fond of using the Trader Jos frozen artichoke hearts in such dishes - not sure if they still carry as I can't get there.

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I've been wittering on about garlic scapes here and earlier in the Farmer's Market topic, but it's appropriate to report dinner here instead of there.

 

Ingredients:

  • some carefully-hoarded "New York Style Calabrese Sausages" from this winter;
  • blanched and chopped garlic scapes;
  • a couple cans' worth of diced tomatoes;
  • a handful of chopped onions from an earlier dinner prep;
  • nearly a tube worth of sun-dried tomato paste;
  • finely grated parmesan;
  • barely-cooked Cavatappi pasta that I discovered thanks to @gfweb when I was trying to cut back on the variety of pasta in our household.
  • I'm not sure the reserved pasta water counts, but I did add some back in while everything was cooking down.

20220720_215010.jpg

 

This is one of those never-the-same-twice dishes in our household, but we were especially delighted with this iteration. The sausage chunks were okay, but seemed to have given much of their flavor to the rest of the dish. The pasta corkscrews were utterly delightful: flavorful, delicate, just a bit of chew, delicious. (I did boil them in heavily-salted water, thanks to a comment from @heidih some time ago. That probably helped.)

 

Did the garlic scapes actually add anything? Maybe. Was it different than if I'd added chunks of garlic? I dunno. But we're happy with the outcome...and that's a Good Thing, because there are plenty of leftovers.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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1 hour ago, heidih said:

So canned/jarred a-chokes? My friends and I were very fond of using the Trader Jos frozen artichoke hearts in such dishes - not sure if they still carry as I can't get there.

heidi, this was much easier than using frozen hearts.   I used jarred "bruschetta"

1590261567_ScreenShot2022-07-20at6_24_14PM.png.aa685cbc7893dfe8cbd973152250943d.png

 

Literally 10 minutes from inspiration to oven.    I made maybe a pint of bechemel, added about half a cup of this jarred chopped and seasoned artichoke product.   Put down a layer of sauce in baking dish, a layer of no-boil lasagne noodles, repeat and repeat for 5 layers, shower with pecarino and threw it in the oven.   DONE.    And it was quite excellent.   Husband had thirds.    I will do this again and also use it as a template for variations.

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17 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

The least flavourful part of the bird. I prefer the feet!

 

Amen on the least flavorful bit. You can get chicken feet many places on the street here (Soweto, South Africa), usually at night. Just cooked over coals. My wife jokes that it's the perfect snack because the toothpick is built in.

 

For all of our years since we lived in India we've preferred and bought leg/thigh, far tastier than the breast!

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PastaMeshugana

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20 minutes ago, pastameshugana said:

You can get chicken feet many places on the street here (Soweto, South Africa), usually at night.

 

Chicken (and duck) feet are hugely common here in China. They are everywhere - in supermarkets to street stalls. Day and night.

 

1667269175_ChickensFeet.thumb.jpg.8d60b6a2ecdc78586b19c252206b19f1.jpg

Spicy Chicken Feet

 

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Duck Feet with Pickled Chilis

 

 

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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@Margaret Pilgrim 

 

your Artichoke lasagne looks fantastic .

 

should cooler weather return some day

 

Ill try it.

 

Ill use TJ's jared artichokes .

 

did you add any cheese ?  was the Cara Mia tart ?

 

I doubt I can find Cara Mia .  are they refrigerated

 

or shelf stable ?

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3 hours ago, rotuts said:

@Margaret Pilgrim 

 

your Artichoke lasagne looks fantastic .

 

should cooler weather return some day

 

Ill try it.

 

Ill use TJ's jared artichokes .

 

did you add any cheese ?  was the Cara Mia tart ?

 

I doubt I can find Cara Mia .  are they refrigerated

 

or shelf stable ?

 

Tart?   They are in a kind of vinaigrette, but not as tart as plain canned artichokes.    They are shelf stable, not refrigerated.    I didn't add cheese between the layers, just on top, although you certainly could.    NOTE: this product is called "bruschetta"; it is seasoned with garlic, herbs and olive oil and is finely chopped.    You could easily sub finely chopped marinated artichokes.

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On 7/17/2022 at 10:11 PM, Honkman said:

Mochitlan-style beef stew - beef chuck pieces cooked in pressure cooker with chickpeas and a sauce made from plenty of guajillo chiles, cumin, oregano, cloves, onion and garlic. Afterwards briefly cook some zucchini and finish with lime juice and cilantro - served with some corn tortillas.

Makes my mouth water.   I like that you added zucchini. Love it in soups and stews.

We went into Victoria yesterday and ended up having Halibut fish and chips for lunch. So decided to postpone the roasted chicken dinner I had planned to make last night until today.
Instead, I made the yeast dough for Tarte au Sucre, one of Anne Willan's recipes that I haven't made in years.
592448803_TarteauSucreJuly20th20221.thumb.jpg.02c24fe6fcb0c13380d12b9d5adac716.jpg
 
Doubled the recipe to make two. One baked in a springform pan
853936776_TarteauSucreJuly20th20222.thumb.jpg.25f4b96f0883f1ba68cee46f0e82854c.jpg
and the other in a tart pan. I froze one.
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We had some while still warm last night
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and then another piece this morning with our early morning cappuccinos.
This is a very rich brioche style dough. And the texture is very light and airy.
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Oven roasted chicken thighs with Dixie Lilly yellow rice blend.  The Perdue thighs came in a family pack from BJ's and were obviously culls from a mechanical processing line.  The smallest were two bites with half a bone. They may have been small and mangled but they sure tasted good!  They were marinated in a mix of fresh squeezed lemon and orange juice, crushed garlic and a roasted pepper seasoned salt.  The pan drippings were reduced along with heavy cream and campari tomatoes then blitzed with a stick blender to create a medium bodied sauce.  

 

IMG_20220720_184559583_HDR.thumb.jpg.82526dcfe43267b06c1e77f4beaa694b.jpg 

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I’ve been trying to get caught up on the two little travel blogs I did recently and I’ve gotten SO far behind posting my regular stuff.  Please forgive how long this post is!

 

@Ann_T and @Duvel – y’all’s schnitzels are looking SO appealing to me this afternoon.  We’re meeting friends for Vietnamese tonight, but I’ll be thinking about schnitzel!

And congratulations, Ann, on the successful smoked steaks.  I think that was something that @Marlene did and she loved them that way, but we’ve never tried it.

 

@gfweb – I’m with @Shelby – your stuffed potatoes look fantastic. 

 

@Norm Matthews – those Asian ribs look great – I love that flavor combination on pork.  Living with a BBQ judge, I know all about that perfect “bite” from a rib.  That’s how we prefer it.  Usually if it is at the “fall off the bone” stage, it’s overcooked and mushy.  Nice that you didn’t find that with yours! 

 

@Smithy – that’s too bad about the stuffed clam and scallop disappointment.  At that price, I’d have tried them, too. 

 

@Shelby – everything looks so good.  I want a sandwich and some fried chicken and those GORGEOUS tomatoes.  You grow corn – you have any idea why sometimes the silk is super hard to remove and other times it just pulls off with no problem?  I use the microwave method to cook – I cut the stalk ends off up to probably the 3rd row of corn, leave the husk and silk on and microwave for about 3 1/2 minutes and then shake the cob out holding it by the "tuft" of husk/silk at the top.  I’d love to know if there is some trick I’m missing.  I don’t ever remember having this much trouble. 

 

@Margaret Pilgrim – your artichoke lasagna reminds of a short cut I discovered some time ago.  I made a chicken, artichoke and spinach pasta sauce with a creamy, Parmesan base.  Tasting it, all three of us said it tasted like chain restaurant spinach and artichoke dip – in a good way!  They sell that frozen in the grocery store, so I’ve made it much more often the short cut way than the “from scratch” way!

 

A dinner last week was “Greek” lamb chops, tomatoes, and cous cous with lemon zest, dried cranberries and pine nuts:

1-IMG_0143.jpg.65948170edcfd428b3b67936915c72d0.jpg

I marinated the chops in the Greek Marinade for Chicken that I made recently.  The flavor didn’t really come through in the lamb and I’m not sure why.  I only marinated for about 8 hours instead of a full 24. Not sure if it was that or just that lamb doesn’t take to the marinade as well as chicken.  Any thoughts on that?  Thanks!  The tomatoes were heirlooms from the produce market and so good (crappy photo), as was the corn:

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Salad and a baguette:

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Another meal from last week  started with a salad:

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And we had (frozen) Chicken Kiev, egg noodles, and corn:

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Tuesday was @Dianne’s Garlic Shrimp, tomatoes (including a few of Mr. Kim’s little ones), corn, salad, and a baguette:

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Wednesday, I dug some flatbreads out of the freezer:

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Served with my marinated cukes and (what else?) salad:

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Last night was our local and usual Chinese restaurant.  Soups (hot & sour and wonton):

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Mr. Kim had the orange beef:

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And I had the crispy honey shrimp:

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Sandwich with Sopressata, hard boiled egg, muenster cheese, olives, capers, gherkins, red bell pepper, basil, and tomato. Sliced pear on the side.

and chips

IMG_2022-07-17-19-54-20-880.jpg

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Rainbow Beef from the Myers & Chang Cookbook (restaurant in Boston) with sirloin flap meat, different peppers, scallions and onion with a sauce made from soy sauce, oyster sauce, chile-fermented black beans and roasted sesame oil - served over rice

416BB36F-E6D7-431A-B322-DA350B700A27.thumb.jpeg.c01195eccdc187709b51e7741647c281.jpeg

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