Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Searzall Pro Edition - Anyone getting one?


andrewk512
 Share

Recommended Posts

Booker and Dax is kickstarting their new Searzall pro edition and I'm wondering whether I should take this opportunity to get one. https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/searzall-pro

 

I heard mixed reviews about the initial searzall, from what I remember, for steak, it's beaten out by other methods of searing (like searing on a coal chimney). I can't really be bothered to light an entire chimney of coal to sear a steak though and there have been a few times this year where I have felt my cheap electric range and broiler have been seriously underpowered (renting and cannot replace, but fixing that situation soon). I could see it being nice for quickly charring some vegetables, pineapple slices, touching up spots of suboptimally browned proteins, maybe a few other niche applications 

 

What do people think of their searzall now that it has been out a few years? Would a larger more powerful searzall be desired if you didn't own one?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't properly answer your question, not having a Searsall Mk I. I'm tempted but will resist.

 

It's basically a one-trick pony and a solution to a problem I don't have. I can cook a great steak on a grill and can sous vide lesser quality meat and then finish on a grill. I have a good enough burner that attaches to a butane canister for creme brulee.

 

I'm not much taken by the new palladium gizmoish palaver and suspect Dave Arnold might be full of BS.

 

No for me. But go get one and report.

Edited by FlashJack
typo (log)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Except that t his one and its cylinder look too big for most drawers

Well, that's one way to encourage more consistent use I suppose. "A feature, not a bug"?

  • Haha 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm curious. Dave Arnold is not full of B.S. ... I've been following his escapades for years and am indebted for quite a bit of useful (if sometimes esoteric) teachings. But the thing is large, and I don't have room for one-trick ponies, unless it's a really impressive trick. I also wish it were cheaper. Version 1 just looked too slow to be useful in real life. If this one's much better, I'll keep a cautious eye on it. 

  • Like 1

Notes from the underbelly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We use ours all the time to melt cheese, a task at which it is truly unsurpassed in my kitchen. We have a decent electric range and a toaster oven that both have broilers, and the Searzall craps all over them. That's about all we use it for, as we have multiple other ways to sear. I also don't tend to cook steaks sous vide. But if I did, and I lived in an apartment with no high output heat source and no ventilation, I'd use it all the time. If I could snap my fingers and turn my V1 into a V2, I certainly would.

 

The palladium coated screens aren't BS -- the very first version of the screens didn't have that coating and could burn out during heavy use. They figured that out and shipped new screens though. Having an extra internal screen to spread out the flame more in the pro seems like a real improvement. 

 

Dancing cheese:

http://www.instagram.com/tv/BwBEcfBAIIk/

 

http://www.instagram.com/p/CS7fAGIpaDa/

 

I take a little longer than is really necessary in the second video because I was focused on the camera and because the cheese slices were so thick. 

Edited by btbyrd
Instagram used to auto embed on this forum... huh. I guess it doesn't anymore. (log)
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, btbyrd said:

We use ours all the time to melt cheese, a task at which it is truly unsurpassed in my kitchen. We have a decent electric range and a toaster oven that both have broilers, and the Searzall craps all over them. That's about all we use it for, as we have multiple other ways to sear. I also don't tend to cook steaks sous vide. But if I did, and I lived in an apartment with no high output heat source and no ventilation, I'd use it all the time. If I could snap my fingers and turn my V1 into a V2, I certainly would.

 

The palladium coated screens aren't BS -- the very first version of the screens didn't have that coating and could burn out during heavy use. They figured that out and shipped new screens though. Having an extra internal screen to spread out the flame more in the pro seems like a real improvement. 

 

Dancing cheese:

http://www.instagram.com/tv/BwBEcfBAIIk/

 

http://www.instagram.com/p/CS7fAGIpaDa/

 

I take a little longer than is really necessary in the second video because I was focused on the camera and because the cheese slices were so thick. 

Makes me want to dig mine out of the drawer! xD

  • Like 1

~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the V1. I dig it. It works pretty well, I use it primarily for marshmallows for s’mores and for reheating pizza. I am looking forward to the pro due to MAPP use, should burn hotter/faster. Will be selling V1 if the pro delivers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I didn't go in this direction

 

sometime ago

 

when it was discovered  that over tim

 

the scores that held the screen in place 

 

' fused ' to the device and it was very difficult to replace the sceen

 

after it , based on usage

 

' burnt out '  ie had holes in it from the heat

 

ect

 

wonder if they fixed that 

 

if its possible to fix

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

On 11/3/2021 at 6:23 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

Makes me want to dig mine out of the drawer! xD

 

Do it! The cheese melting is so satisfying. My wife, who is a good cook but not really a gadget gal, gets into it without hesitation and Searzalls her burger cheese and breakfast sandwiches with gusto. Also good for shredded mozzarella over pasta.

 

6 minutes ago, rotuts said:

I didn't go in this direction

 

sometime ago

 

when it was discovered  that over tim

 

the scores that held the screen in place 

 

' fused ' to the device and it was very difficult to replace the sceen

 

after it , based on usage

 

' burnt out '  ie had holes in it from the heat

 

ect

 

wonder if they fixed that 

 

if its possible to fix

 

The palladium coated screens don't burn out. And I'm still running my original set of non-coated screens after six years and they show no signs of burning out. I do have a spare set, just in case. In the event that there are problems changing screens, the Booker and Dax support crew is very good. cdh on eGullet had problems with the screws and sent it in for repair and Dave fixed it for him.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

So...like...for lasagna?  Or...why?

 

Or meatballs. Or chicken/veal parm or whatever. Or gringofied low-brow spaghetti with red sauce topped with garbage low moisture shreds. Also good for cheesed-out garlic bread.

 

6 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

It's an improvement over my Viking infra-red in-range broiler?

 

I haven't used one and infrared broilers are much better than lower-end ones. But the Searzall is better than the broilers on any of the mid-tier electric and gas ranges I've used, and there are certain applications (like searing foie gras) where I'm doubtful any standard broiler could replicate the Searzall's results. And having that power in the palm of your hand is something special compared to conventional broilers. It's a much more precise tool for delivering heat where you want it (and none where you don't).

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading the thread, it's probably something I want but not really the next kitchen tool for me. I'm anxiously watching the Indiegogo campaign to see if they make it, I would throw in the cash for 1-2 searzall pros+torches if need be to support the 400+ hours that Dave Arnold's voice has occupied my ears

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, andrewk512 said:

Reading the thread, it's probably something I want but not really the next kitchen tool for me. I'm anxiously watching the Indiegogo campaign to see if they make it, I would throw in the cash for 1-2 searzall pros+torches if need be to support the 400+ hours that Dave Arnold's voice has occupied my ears

I hear you, fellow Low Quality Individual.

  • Like 3
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, btbyrd said:

Or gringofied low-brow spaghetti with red sauce topped with garbage low moisture shreds

 This is what I was kinda trying to find out.  I know no gringos who do this…is it a southern thing?

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

It's an improvement over my Viking infra-red in-range broiler?

 

Without having used the Searzall, I can imagine advantages and disadvantages. I think your big broiler will be better for most big jobs. It has more total horsepower and spreads its heat out over a wider area, and so will go much faster. 

 

If you often do little things, like croque monsieurs, or sous-vide scallops, it will be faster and easier to use the searzall than to fire up a broiler. You also have more control with the little guy, because it's in your hand, on the countertop, and gives instant feedback. 

 

The thing with big bad infrared oven broilers is that they're hard to be precise with, unless you get down on your hands and knees ready to pounce when the food hits the sweet spot. You quickly understand why restaurant salamanders are mounted at eye level and don't have doors. 

  • Like 3

Notes from the underbelly

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

The Searzall Pro is compatible with MAPP gas. And with MAPP gas, this Searzall Pro is MUCH faster than the original.

 

eh, what? MAPP gas hasn't been readily available in over a decade. lol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/12/2021 at 2:29 AM, jaw said:

 

eh, what? MAPP gas hasn't been readily available in over a decade. lol

They undboutedly mean "MAP PRO", or however they style it, which is propylene (AKA propene (not propane)).  It's maybe 10% hotter, and has a little higher energy  content.  Not worth the price premium over propane for most uses. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I am going to be that loser that waits till it comes to market now that everyone has funded it. Crossing my fingers for cheaper shipping ($30 USD and no combined shipping when I requested to buy 2 units...). I have also been burned lately with 20%+ import fees on everything I am buying from the US ($20 on a cookbook, ~$200 on my blast chiller, 100% import fee on plates from Korin) 

Edited by andrewk512 (log)
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have one of the originals that I use and like.  I use it regularly, and think it's worth the asking price.

 

That being said, I think the best way to think about the Searzall is that it's a finishing tool.  Don't expect it to sear 4 steaks in time to serve them all together.  But it will melt cheese, toast bread and caramelize sugar pretty fast.  And I do use it on steaks, chops and roasts to even out sears and browning, get a jump on the "up" sides of tings, solidify/crisp fried eggs, etc.  I think it's a versatile tool.  But it has a high accident potential.

 

If I didn't already have v1.0, I would definitely get this new model--it looks like the improvements are worthwhile.  

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...