Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

What to do with Braunschweiger?


Johntodd
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi!

 

I have a bit of this stuff, and I love it. But I'm getting bored just eating it on crackers with mustard.

 

What else can be done with this delicious delicacy?

 

I am an experienced home cook.

 

Thanks!

-John

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I also got bored and did not have any stock on an "I need soup" day. I sort of melted it into some broth made with powder as an enrichment. I enjoyed the soup.  I've had some that is soft like liverwurst and some that is sliceable. The former as quenelles in soup, the latter sauteed like people fry up bologna. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did once tuck it into phyllo triangles with spinach when the frozen dough kept falling out of the freezer and the larder was kind of bare. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand that Braunschweiger in a US context refers to a kind of liver sausage.

 

In that case you could use it as the base for a Banh Mi, a filling for puff pastry pieces together with sautéed apples and caramelized onions, or mixed with fried minced meat and a healthy dose of bechamel in filled Canelons pasta …

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have some in the fridge most of the time.  A minor use is hiding pills for my dog, the only thing that he swallows without tasting.

I smear it on the inside of pocket pita, add cheese, chopped onions, chopped celery, wrap in parchment and microwave for one minute.

  • Like 4

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Yea on the first two; not so sure about the caneloni filling.    I would say just about anything might work except liverwurst.    😀


A good balance is about 3 parts fried minced meat to 1 part liver sausage to 1.5 parts stiff bechamel. The liver sausage melts into the mixture and - together with the bechamel - lends a kind of smooth & creamy gameyness to the dish. I find it quite pleasant …

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, Duvel said:

I understand that Braunschweiger in a US context refers to a kind of liver sausage.

 

In that case you could use it as the base for a Banh Mi, a filling for puff pastry pieces together with sautéed apples and caramelized onions, or mixed with fried minced meat and a healthy dose of bechamel in filled Canelons pasta …

Your apples & onions makes way more sense than my spinach. Guess I had spanakopita on the brain.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a cookbook written in 1949 and it has a recipe for Braunwschweiger spread.  Cook 1/2 C. mushrooms in 1 Tbsp. butter until tender, add a cup of liver sausage, 1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce, salt if desired and enough mayonnaise to bind it together and spread on bread for a sandwich or on potato chips.   Another one says to mix it with sweet pickle relish and a little mayo.  Spread on bread, top with cheese and but the open faced sandwiches under the broiler until heated through

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

one generally accepted idea is:

Braunschweiger is smoked liverwurst

 

around here various brands - some national, some local - have different consistencies, and of course slightly different taste.

 

our Federal minions, who have little to do other than nothing, do not distinguish:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/9/319.182

 

one of the favorites while growing up: 

Oscar Meyer used to produce a "Sandwich Spread" (discontinued) which had 'other stuff' ala what Norm mentioned above.

 

and , , , kids be funny.  liverwurst & onion sandwich is a fav for me; the kids absolutely hated it . . .

until age 40+/-

was visiting . . . opened the  fridge and there was a chunk of liverwurst.  almost fell over . . .

  • Haha 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, AlaMoi said:

one generally accepted idea is:

Braunschweiger is smoked liverwurst


Just a disclaimer: generally accepted in the US … in its birth land it is more of a coarse salami (a soft subtype of Mettwurst) …

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AlaMoi said:

uhmmm, having spend time in Braunscwheig . . . I don't agree, except to agree every corner butcher does his own version . . .

 


The city of Braunschweig certainly agrees on the Mettwurst version 😋

 

(click)

 

519c6337deafd5bb32bc20d70ed704c2.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This thread has struck a chord.    We haven't had  either braunschweiger or liverwurst in the house in probably 40 years.    Maybe time for some.   Can see it on fresh bread, mayo, onions, cornichons.    Yes, gonna do it!

  • Like 4

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

from the link:

 

streichfähige geräucherte Mettwurst...
Aber auch die Knackwurst, eine feinere helle Streichwurst...
and then.....
Sie wird in der Regel jedoch nicht als "Braunschweiger" bezeichnet.

  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah the wonderful world of sausages and sausage designations and names. In mainstream markets in the US it is like a firm Leberwurst in my experience. And origin nomenclature does not affect taste - so my usual thinking - eat what you like. I'll take what is labeled here as liverwurst over Braunschweiger any day but one makes do with availability especially in these supply chain messed up times. My favorite is from Alpine Market with wild mushrooms. 

 

An anecdotal aside - I had to laugh at Viennese born stepmother squealing yesterday about the salami being off because of the shite powdery rind. I had to pull out the brie and show her that white mold inoculation as well. She still did not grasp it. - and she lived in Belgium and France as well. People!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

39 minutes ago, AlaMoi said:

from the link:

 

streichfähige geräucherte Mettwurst...
Aber auch die Knackwurst, eine feinere helle Streichwurst...
and then.....
Sie wird in der Regel jedoch nicht als "Braunschweiger" bezeichnet.


Yeap …

 

Unter Braunschweiger versteht man hier eher eine streichfähige geräucherte Mettwurst aus weichem, grobem Schweinefleisch.

 

Braunschweiger is a spreadable smoked sausage made from soft, coarse pork.

 

So exactly which part is it that you are struggling with ? 
 

Leberwurst (liverwurst) is an entire different dominion in Germany, and regardless what they sold you in your time here, it ain’t Braunschweiger (again, here. In the US it is a completely different story). Sorry about that …

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Duvel said:


Yeap …

 

Unter Braunschweiger versteht man hier eher eine streichfähige geräucherte Mettwurst aus weichem, grobem Schweinefleisch.

 

Braunschweiger is a spreadable smoked sausage made from soft, coarse pork.

 

So exactly which part is it that you are struggling with ? 
 

Leberwurst (liverwurst) is an entire different dominion in Germany, and regardless what they sold you in your time here, it ain’t Braunschweiger (again, here. In the US it is a completely different story). Sorry about that …

I don't see how that should come as any surprise.    Look what Franco-American sells as spaghetti or Kraft sells as cheese.

  • Haha 1

eGullet member #80.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I don't see how that should come as any surprise.    Look what Franco-American sells as spaghetti or Kraft sells as cheese.


And I think that’s only fair - the US variety is a distinct product on its own right, as is the German one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

not struggling with anything.

the link cited says the Mettwurst types and Knackwurst types

"Sie wird in der Regel jedoch nicht als "Braunschweiger" bezeichnet. "

they are as a rule however not designated as "Braunschwiger"

 

so call it whatever you like - but the people who wrote  the link apparently don't call the Mettwurst style Braunschweiger.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...