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The Diners in Your Life


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53 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Also not a diner but a coffee shop with Googie architecture, the Ships chain had not a jukebox but a toaster on every table.   Not sure if there were ever any electrocutions but as this article points out, Ships always did smell like burnt toast!

 

I know I ate at at least 2 of the Ships several times yet have no recollection of the toasters or the food. Must have been in my "do not eat heartily in front of males" phase.  Pre GPS at least you could see them from far away as they were/are on busy streets.  Like Randy's  giant donut topped shops. 

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4 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Another diner characteristic is its club-like ambiance.    You will find the same people arriving at the same time every day, at breakfast or lunch.    Familiar to the staff and to friends they join in booths.    Seemingly picking up conversations from the day before.   We have often adopted one of these when traveling, having breakfast everyday at the Peterborough or Miss Flo diner.    We were always of interest in that we were obviously not locals much less club members.   Often the waitress would ask where we were from.

 

 

My retired Father joined up with a "men's club" in his over-55 community, they invade a local diner once a month for breakfast and likely torture the same waitress who always works their table, and probably has the patience of a Saint.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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4 minutes ago, BeeZee said:

My retired Father joined up with a "men's club" in his over-55 community, they invade a local diner once a month for breakfast and likely torture the same waitress who always works their table, and probably has the patience of a Saint.

I see them at the diners and at Denny's in particular. I've commented to the waitresses and they love serving them - despite the $1 under the coffee cup tip. I wish my dad had cultivated something like that.  In retrospect on my post re Ship's above  it was the lack of the feeling of belonging that probably made the visits not memorable.  And veering once again away from diners - I think of the donut shops that also have the regular crowd (men) every morning over coffee solving world problems + donuts.  There is one on the Pacific Coast Highway where if a guy does not show up they text to make sure he is still kickin. An attractive female friend used to walk past with her pup every morning and sit for a bit - kinda made their day. Outdoor seating.

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5 hours ago, heidih said:

I see them at the diners and at Denny's in particular. I've commented to the waitresses and they love serving them - despite the $1 under the coffee cup tip. I wish my dad had cultivated something like that.  In retrospect on my post re Ship's above  it was the lack of the feeling of belonging that probably made the visits not memorable.  And veering once again away from diners - I think of the donut shops that also have the regular crowd (men) every morning over coffee solving world problems + donuts.  There is one on the Pacific Coast Highway where if a guy does not show up they text to make sure he is still kickin. An attractive female friend used to walk past with her pup every morning and sit for a bit - kinda made their day. Outdoor seating.

 

Here there is a coffee shop in the same building* as the post office, not far from the library.  I have never been inside.  No women, always the same men.  Old men.  As far as I know the coffee shop gets by without waitresses.

 

 

*a converted house.  Keep in mind the population is about the same as fictional Centerville in The Dead Don't Die.

 

There was a diner out by the highway, but that is another town, and the dinner is now a bank.  I broke a tooth on their salad once.

 

If I had a car I think it would be fun to drive up to the Catskills and locate that dinner from the movie.  I just wouldn't stay at the motel.

 

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A coffee shop is not a diner.

 

Waffle House is not a diner.

 

Howard Johnson's was not a diner. Nor is Denny's, IHOP, et al.

 

This is a diner, in the city where diners were made industrially, by the Worcester Lunch Car Company, in Worcester, Mass. It's the Boulevard Diner. 

 

1839045757_WorcesterDinerIMG_7122.thumb.JPG.a0b70e85c6256d2ad91466d45e8f7be6.JPG

 

1149288949_WorcesterDiner.thumb.JPG.35b0e184d3767b501470d44b11766672.JPG

 

This is The Miss Worcester Diner...

 

image.thumb.png.b82ff4e90b7484ef144a1edb9e859594.png

 

Worcester's Historic Diners.  The Lunch Wagon Kings.

 

image.thumb.png.928d3afd9d965189b12f6c00a35c80b2.png

 

The Taghkanic Parkway was an early north-south route in New York state, east of the Hudson River. At one time, there were 4 diners along the route, for hungry travelers. There are still two; the one I've eaten at a couple of times is called the West Taghkanic Diner, taken over by a real chef and serving quite gussied up "diner food." It's a perfect example of how diners grew to be much larger than the original railroad dining car style diners...

 

image.thumb.png.1918eac9891fb21ee242628356ae15ce.png

 

Here's a nice lunch Significant Eater and I shared at the West Taghkanic...

 

284665964_Taghkanic06-26.thumb.jpeg.3bb3941b167d2961b58bcc18424eee9d.jpeg

 

 More about diners along the Taghkanic...https://www.roadsidefans.com/features/taconic-parkway-new-yorks-diner-drive

 

When I was a kid, our crew would go to one of two diners:  The Franklin Diner in Franklin Square, no longer in existence, and the extant Lantern Diner, on Hempstead Tpke. in West Hempstead.  Our waitress, Linda, could carry more plates on her arms than anyone in existence. Then we ran into her one night at Roosevelt Raceway, and knew she was a kindred spirit.

 

P.S.  The west coast has nothing to do with real diners. 

 

 

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1 minute ago, weinoo said:

P.S.  The west coast has nothing to do with real diners. 

 

 

And believe me, I loved the Fog City Diner, ate there many times in its early life. It was great.

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Don't know I'd have to watch it again.

 

But the scene in Goodfellas, where Jimmy learns Tommy got whacked, takes place in a diner...

 

image.png.b06ba2a6b873148e52fea588d325c264.png

 

Sitting in the diner where I had a scene with Robert DeNiro at the end of GOODFELLAS. Also where the phone booth was, which he knocked over when he found out that Tommy (Joe Pesci) got whacked and he, Bob knocked over the phone booth. Can't remember where I put my keys, but I can remember almost everything that happened on certain movies. Anyway, we just happened to be filming Shades of Blue there the other night.

 

image.thumb.png.733bcd1339d720e7fb263b272b780d52.png

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25 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Would you consider the setting of the Pulp Fiction Ringo and Honey Bunny robbery scene to be a diner?

 

Nah - too fancy to be a diner...

 

image.png.d4c0570e6e28096f5f89e78f5649ad3e.png       image.png.bbc5ac0e2bf0c120d20ab6ea74ee0376.png

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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1 minute ago, weinoo said:

 

Nah - too fancy to be a diner...

 

image.png.d4c0570e6e28096f5f89e78f5649ad3e.png       image.png.bbc5ac0e2bf0c120d20ab6ea74ee0376.png

 

I was thinking not fancy but too chain like.

 

It's the Taconic prkwy now.  (Taghkannic was obviously too challenging)

 

I think I worked with Linda.  Petit monde.

 

😁

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15 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

The Native American in me just died a little!

 

Spell it however you want and you won't be wrong.

 

Like Yiddish or Chinese,  the Indians didn't write it down with English alphabet letters.

Edited by gfweb (log)
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Another Diner I briefly worked for was the Seacrest in Glen Cove.  It gained notoriety for a horrible incident in the early 80's just before my time. A gang of miscreants took it over for a few hours, holding staff and customers hostage while robbing, beating and raping including forcing customers on each other.  It was the first thing you were told when you began a job there in case you wanted to change your mind.  I powered through.  One of the criticisms was that it had no windows to escape from.  They made renovations.   

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14 minutes ago, gfweb said:

 

Spell it however you want and you won't be wrong.

 

Like Yiddish or Chinese,  the Indians didn't write it down with English alphabet letters.

 

English doesn't write with the English alphabet either! It's a slightly modified Roman / Latin alphabet!

The "English" alphabet looks like this.

1062px-Anglosaxonrunes_svg.thumb.png.df39ca6e5605bf401eeac78bb1a0fb2c.png

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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3 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

And believe me, I loved the Fog City Diner, ate there many times in its early life. It was great.

 

Totally agree.   FCD was a great little restaurant but a diner in name only.   It is still quite viable but not the star it was under creator Cindy Pawlcyn.   

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@Margaret Pilgrim – I have actually been to the Peterborough diner many years ago – over 30.  A dear friend from HS was there for the summer because her husband was in summer stock with the Players.  I went for a week to keep her company and we ate there a couple of times.  I can still remember how good the food was. 

 

The South doesn't really do diners.  Our version is the cafe, I guess.  But I adore a REAL diner (like those "train car" types posted) and, when we traveled north in the past, they were a frequent stop.  

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1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

 

Totally agree.   FCD was a great little restaurant but a diner in name only.   It is still quite viable but not the star it was under creator Cindy Pawlcyn.   

 

Cindy was awesome. The closest "diner" eatery I can think of in the city (of San Francisco) is Mel's, which was called Mel's Drive In, but I think has morphed into Mel's Diner?

 

3 minutes ago, BetD said:

Mickey’s Diner in St. Paul, MN is a real classic… we have enjoyed a few meals cozily ensconced in one of their booths!  💕

 

https://www.exploreminnesota.com/profile/mickeys-diner/9940

 

Nice.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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49 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

Cindy was awesome. The closest "diner" eatery I can think of in the city (of San Francisco) is Mel's, which was called Mel's Drive In, but I think has morphed into Mel's Diner?

 

Mel's, actually a block from me, was alweays more of a drive-in, something the west coast does well.    it's not a diner in the east coast sense.    Diners have a certain vibe that you can't create from scratch.   

eGullet member #80.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/26/2021 at 3:25 PM, heidih said:

 

OMG how did they keep those from being filched?!  I can sense collectors twitching.

 

They weren't part of the diner's gear, but were made by a local ceramicist and sold at the shop.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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Moving a diner from (NJ to) GR to Muskegon

 

Quote

Pal’s Diner, an iconic, 1954 New Jersey diner, was relocated from 6503 28th St. in Grand Rapids to Hot Rod Harley-Davidson, 149 Shoreline Drive, under new owners Scott and Mark Campbell.

 

 

Pal's.jpg

Edited by Alex (log)
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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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On 10/28/2021 at 9:45 AM, gfweb said:

 

Spell it however you want and you won't be wrong.

 

Like Yiddish or Chinese,  the Indians didn't write it down with English alphabet letters.

 

I thought you were incorrect and that you were thinking Hebrew when you wrote Yiddish.  Then I looked it up and found that written Yiddish uses the Hebrew alphabet.  Learn something new every day.

   

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12 hours ago, Steve R. said:

 

I thought you were incorrect and that you were thinking Hebrew when you wrote Yiddish.  Then I looked it up and found that written Yiddish uses the Hebrew alphabet.  Learn something new every day.

   

That's meshugah.

 

Or - משגע

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Here are a bunch more pictures and videos about Pal's Diner, mentioned a couple of posts above.

 

 

Pal's at night.jpg

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

Gene Weingarten, writing in the Washington Post about online news stories and the accompanying readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

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