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What to do with (really) dried lemon slices?


Kim Shook
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Mr. Kim ordered these dried lemon slices from Nuts.com:

IMG_7001.thumb.jpg.54f220e7343480ba3da022faab6e8121.jpg

 

They are not the half-dried fruit slices like the oranges I got at Trader Joes - they break rather than bend.  To me, they are crisp and bitter to the point of being inedible.  Any ideas on what to do with them (it is a very large bag).

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These are very common here. From what I understand, they are used in herbal teas. They are to be found in most supermarkets, alongside the other ingredients uesd in such teas. That's not something I drink, so can't say more than that. Sorry.

 

1517015613_DriedLemon.thumb.jpg.2745ccf6174e06b8336a90a0e2c35967.jpg

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

Mr. Kim ordered these dried lemon slices from Nuts.com:

IMG_7001.thumb.jpg.54f220e7343480ba3da022faab6e8121.jpg

 

They are not the half-dried fruit slices like the oranges I got at Trader Joes - they break rather than bend.  To me, they are crisp and bitter to the point of being inedible.  Any ideas on what to do with them (it is a very large bag).

They would go nicely in chocolate. 

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Yes but you are bitter sensitive I think so a really small test  batch to see. Again bitter would be an issue but I see them in Middle Eastern stews with lots of warm spices. 

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I'd like them in hot or iced tea, mulled cider or to garnish a cocktail. They could be steamed lightly to soften enough that you can chop them and use in baking. They’d be a good sub for fresh lemon slices in poached prunes, figs or other fruits. 
Those things appeal to me, but I like a touch of bitterness and as @heidih said, you may not.

In that case, I’m sure you could use them to make a pretty garland, maybe with eucalyptus and cinnamon sticks, for holiday decor. Or make one for the Christmas tree with popcorn and cranberries. You can always simmer a few with cloves or other spices for a little potpourri. 

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