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Favorite simple bonbon filling recipes for a low budget?


wannabechocolatier
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Could you folks help me out with some filling recipes with a good consistency? I don't need anything with fancy flavors, just some basic ganaches/caramels with an ideal consistency.

 

Greweling's book doesn't seem to have anything plain, everything's got alcohol, different flavorings, etc. Same goes for other books I've seen so far. 

 

Relevant ingredients I have on hand are dark chocolate, sugar, glucose syrup, butter, and cream. I could get an additional ingredient or two, but I want to learn the simple stuff before I try anything fancy.

 

Thanks for any and all recipes and suggestions!

Edited by wannabechocolatier (log)
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Hello there and welcome to the forum, I've enjoyed reading your threads, I remember having most of the same questions when starting out doing this stuff.

 

So you obviously have a copy of Greweling's book, on page 258 (2nd ed.) the Caramel Creams is a formula you should try. It comes out really nicely. It does take time, of course, for it to full cool, but alot of things do with confectionery. You dont need to add and alcohol, though it is nice with it, but generally I dont add it either. The resulting caramel (like he says in the book) is like a very thick fluid. Even though the recipe calls for making the chocolate lined foils cups, this is my go to caramel for a molded bonbon. This recipe is great, cheap to make, long shelf life, tastes great and wide appeal.

 

The other I've used for probably about 10 years is the Liqueur Ganache on p. 116. Again, it comes out nicely with the liqueur added, but its not necessary. This formula minus the alcohol makes a great 'blank canvas' dark chocolate ganache, and its easy to flavor with infusing the cream beforehand with coffee or spices. Like the little note says at the bottom, it can be used to piped or slabbed centers, a great simple formula.

 

I think others have recommended it, but you should check out Wybauw's Fine Chocolates Gold. The book is a little pricey, but it is a great reference, you'll find alot more in there. Not that one is better then another, I love both publications, but its always good to have multiple references on the subject.

 

Fine Chocolates Gold

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4 hours ago, minas6907 said:

Hello there and welcome to the forum, I've enjoyed reading your threads, I remember having most of the same questions when starting out doing this stuff.

 

So you obviously have a copy of Greweling's book, on page 258 (2nd ed.) the Caramel Creams is a formula you should try. It comes out really nicely. It does take time, of course, for it to full cool, but alot of things do with confectionery. You dont need to add and alcohol, though it is nice with it, but generally I dont add it either. The resulting caramel (like he says in the book) is like a very thick fluid. Even though the recipe calls for making the chocolate lined foils cups, this is my go to caramel for a molded bonbon. This recipe is great, cheap to make, long shelf life, tastes great and wide appeal.

 

The other I've used for probably about 10 years is the Liqueur Ganache on p. 116. Again, it comes out nicely with the liqueur added, but its not necessary. This formula minus the alcohol makes a great 'blank canvas' dark chocolate ganache, and its easy to flavor with infusing the cream beforehand with coffee or spices. Like the little note says at the bottom, it can be used to piped or slabbed centers, a great simple formula.

 

I think others have recommended it, but you should check out Wybauw's Fine Chocolates Gold. The book is a little pricey, but it is a great reference, you'll find alot more in there. Not that one is better then another, I love both publications, but its always good to have multiple references on the subject.

 

Fine Chocolates Gold

Thanks for the tips!

 

I've got Wybauw's book on pdf. I'm just astounded at the fact that while all these books have recipes they label "classic," there isn't a single plain ganache to be found.

 

Also, in your experience, should alcohol be subbed with some other liquid or left out altogether? I couldn't decide if I should replace 100% of the liquid or just the particular variety's water content. 

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On 8/26/2021 at 4:47 PM, wannabechocolatier said:

Thanks for the tips!

 

I've got Wybauw's book on pdf. I'm just astounded at the fact that while all these books have recipes they label "classic," there isn't a single plain ganache to be found.

 

Also, in your experience, should alcohol be subbed with some other liquid or left out altogether? I couldn't decide if I should replace 100% of the liquid or just the particular variety's water content. 

 

I do understand what you mean, and I remember thinking the same thing, but it is easy enough to find a formula that relies on infusing the cream with an ingredient, then just removing that component. When I was starting out doing chocolate, I had the same thought as like a practice ganache, but eventually figured that if I was going through the trouble of making molded shells, my bonbons might as well be flavored. That being said, I'm pretty sure with what Wybauw writes on formulating ganache, it could be figured out with reasonable ease. 

 

As for the alcohol, I dont substitute it with anything else. Don't overthink it, it's a small percentage of the formula, it's water that your not adding, it will work fine without it. 

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