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Can I get some lentil advice, please?


Kim Shook
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So, when Mr. Kim was stocking up the food stores last year, he bought a few bags of these lentils:

IMG_6630.jpg.e01a2eec8f3e25762993314aacd58657.jpg

NOTHING on the bag says what kind/color they are.  I think they are green because the directions on the bag call for simmering 15-20 minutes with no soaking.  We have way too many lentils (I confess that I've probably used a total of 4 pounds of lentils in the entirety of our  39 year marriage) and I want to use these up.  I'd like to sub them in for the called for French green lentils (such as le Puy) in this Ina Garten recipe.  The recipe calls for the lentils to be simmered for an hour.  But other recipes that I've researched only call for the French lentils to be cooked for 15-20 minutes, like my unidentified lentils.  😱🤪

 

I guess my question is: if I shorten the recipe-specified cooking time to 15-20 minutes (adding the lentils and kielbasa at the same time????) will all the flavors meld properly?  Thank you so much!

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13 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

 

I guess my question is: if I shorten the recipe-specified cooking time to 15-20 minutes (adding the lentils and kielbasa at the same time????) will all the flavors meld properly?  Thank you so much!

 

I'd say your plan sounds excellent. I agree they look like either green or brown lentils, both of which cook quickly and are likely to split and get a bit mushy when cooked longer.  I find that acceptable in a soup like the one you have in mind.  The French green lentils can take a bit longer to cook (although I think full hour is a bit excessive) and will remain intact longer.  I wouldn't sub your lentils for the French ones in a salad where you want them to remain distinct but I think that soup would be fine. 

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14 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I'd say your plan sounds excellent. I agree they look like either green or brown lentils, both of which cook quickly and are likely to split and get a bit mushy when cooked longer.  I find that acceptable in a soup like the one you have in mind.  The French green lentils can take a bit longer to cook (although I think full hour is a bit excessive) and will remain intact longer.  I wouldn't sub your lentils for the French ones in a salad where you want them to remain distinct but I think that soup would be fine. 

Agreed - they look brown and I use them in soup, dal  that sort of prep. I enjoy their earthy (to me) taste.,I like them pretty wel cooked - not chewy.

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You can also cook them and make veggie patties ("burgers"), or vegetarian "meatballs". Both of which can be frozen.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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These are brown lentils, which is what most folks think of when they think of lentils, assuming they think about lentils at all. I agree with the others: soup, stew, etc. would be just fine, and yes, these usually are done in 15-20 minutes, maybe 25, depending on how old they are and how mushy you like them. The flavors should meld.

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"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

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Like with pasta (and most other things) trust your taste, not the written times.

I also always soak lentils when I plan ahead, it shortens the cooking.

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~ Shai N.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I love the lentil salad recipe in Julia Child's Way to Cook.  You soak for about 30ish minutes, drain, then add fresh water and cook til tender (about 20ish minutes), drain then toss with a garlic/Dijon mustard dressing also in the book which is really delicious; you can add shredded carrots, black olives, meat if you want, it's better than pasta salad in the summer!

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3 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Really? In my experience, most people think of red split lentils.

Different countries, different experiences My part of the world to "average Joe" is brown.

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