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Identify my slicer?


dscheidt
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I don't know that the actual model number will matter greatly, they're all pretty similar in how they operate. If you poke around you might find a plate somewhere on the unit that gives a model number and date of manufacture.

If you're looking for some operating instructions or suchlike, just Googling "Berkel" slicer manual filetype:pdf should get you what you're looking for. These are a few of the top results:

https://www.alfaco.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/919-Manual.pdf

https://resources.itwfeg.com/sites/resourcecenter/kroger/TechnicalServiceManuals/909-919 Technical Manual.pdf

https://assets.centralrestaurant.com/pdfs/docs/515-238-OWNR.pdf

 

Just poke around until you find one that looks like your machine, and go with it.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Usually (always?) there's a plate with electrical specifications and the model would be listed - on the bottom or inside?

 

p

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1 hour ago, chromedome said:

I don't know that the actual model number will matter greatly, they're all pretty similar in how they operate. If you poke around you might find a plate somewhere on the unit that gives a model number and date of manufacture.

 

yeah, It's completely devoid of markings.  There's a number in the main body casting ("F  25660   37"),  and that's the only marking I've found on it.  I expect it's going to need a few parts, and I don't know how universal they'll be.  At the absolute minimum, it's going to need feet.  Probably a set of sharpening stones, and possible a blade.    Also, god, it's heavy. 

IMG_9629 copy.jpg

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Perhaps I am being overly simplistic but why not contact the parent company. I was gonna ask dad but he is more familiar with Laska. .  

Berkel is covered by fellow ITW Food Equipment Group division Hobart Service. With more than 100 locations and a whopping 1,500 factory-trained service technicians throughout both the US and Canada, Hobart Service offers invaluable, world-class assistance in keeping your food equipment in optimal running condition.

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26 minutes ago, heidih said:

Perhaps I am being overly simplistic but why not contact the parent company. I was gonna ask dad but he is more familiar with Laska. .  

Berkel is covered by fellow ITW Food Equipment Group division Hobart Service. With more than 100 locations and a whopping 1,500 factory-trained service technicians throughout both the US and Canada, Hobart Service offers invaluable, world-class assistance in keeping your food equipment in optimal running condition.

I will, but ITW are awful about anything they didn't make.  I've also had horrible dealings with their service departments ("you can't buy parts, you have to have them installed by our service people.  Oh, you're not a commercial user, we can't service you." is not atypical).  

 

 

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10 hours ago, heidih said:

Well who knows you might get lucky ;) What are your intentions with the slicer?

Not cutting my fingers off!  I am going to use it at home, to do normal household slicing stuff. 

 

I've got a little chefs choice slicer, which for what it cost, is good.  But it struggles to slice cheese, and it doesn't slice very thinly. 

So it's not really good enough for what I want to do.  It's also a pain to slice something with a high aspect ratio (like a pepperoni.)

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 8/5/2021 at 10:52 AM, dscheidt said:

Not cutting my fingers off!

 

Well, with all respect to @chromedome don't be poking it with anything. 

 

I wish I had a good enough reason to buy a slicer that would get past my wife. Thinking, thinking, thinking...

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18 hours ago, CentralMA said:

 

Well, with all respect to @chromedome don't be poking it with anything. 

 

I wish I had a good enough reason to buy a slicer that would get past my wife. Thinking, thinking, thinking...

 

 

 

My wife insists that I can't put it in the kitchen, and makes me keep it in my office.  not the handiest place for it, but the table is on wheels, so it will roll to the sink for use.   so far, I have resisted the urge to make a sandwich during a meeting. 

 

IMG_9718.thumb.jpg.1a12b360d29851b13ae7d17c598aa621.jpg

 

this thing was a horrible mess; I think it was stored in a barn.   Grease and crud packed everywhere, including places you'd not think it could get to.  Lots of scraping, degreasing, and cleaning.  it cleaned up well, and need just a set of feet (sourced from the well-known food service equipment supplier McMaster-Carr), a belt, and a set of sharpening stones. 

 

IMG_9694.thumb.jpg.a057898d96433d988fd584171b757a63.jpg

 

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Thanks for the McMaster-Carr reminder. They'd fallen off my radar Our slicer is packed up in the garage and needs new foot pads, Won;t ask about the inflatable dino ;)

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Have a slicer that has been gathering a bit of dust due to cleaning issues - great job on the tomatoes, but how long was the cleanup afterwards?

 

p

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Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, palo said:

Have a slicer that has been gathering a bit of dust due to cleaning issues - great job on the tomatoes, but how long was the cleanup afterwards?

 

p

Cleaning is take the output tray and blade cover off (they're stainless, and could go through the dishwasher).  Then remove the move the part of the carriage that touches the food (it's probably not dishwasher safe).  Wash those components.  The bit that adjusts to set the thickness of slices swings up and back, so you can easily wash it, and access the space under the cariage.   Remove any food crumbs, carefully wipe the blade clean.  Then spray with steramine, let dry, reassemble. 

 

that takes a few minutes, not really worth it for a single tomato, but if it were on my kitchen counter, I might use it to slice everything for a single sandwich.  It's less of a hassle than the plastic chef's choice I have is. 

 

Edited by dscheidt (log)
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42 minutes ago, dscheidt said:

I might use it to slice everything for a single sandwich. 

Even though I am a huge fan of kitchen toys, both large and small, I have trouble getting my head around using a slicer when making one single sandwich. But of course I recognize that such decisions are personal choices.
Thanks for sharing your experience with this “toy”. I would have been jealous at one time in my life. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, rotuts said:

do you have to detach the blade 

 

to clean both sides ?

Blade is removed only for replacement or belt replacement.  It weighs about five pounds and is razor sharp, so removal is not a routine task. 

 

when the blade guard is removed, you can get to the whol front of the blade, and about 1/4 of the back.  Rotate it acouple times to clean the rest. 

Edited by dscheidt (log)
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Many years ago I worked functions at a country club style facility. Spent a lot of time grinding out weddings, sometimes 4 or 5 a weekend. Think of a place like a puppy mill, but for weddings.

I tended bar, could make enough $$$ Friday - Sunday to be able to do most anything I wanted to during the week.Had a new house, a young one at home, worked out pretty well.

The lull at the bar came when people were being called to their seats for dinner service. For me that was time to restock beer, ice, etc. Catch up on drink garnishes, empty liquors.

The kitchen took the quick way out on plating prime rib dinners. Out came the behemoth slicer, ribs loaded on one by one, blade adjustment made, let the slicing begin.

I'd get there just before it started, and would place bread in the catch tray of the slicer. As they sliced they'd catch it by hand, so only drippings and meat remnants would get collected by the bread.

Beer cooler was just past the slicing station. I'd swing by, grab the bread collecting all the goodness, add more bread to the tray, back to the bar. After 3 or 4 trips I was well fed.

Good times.

Edited by CentralMA (log)
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