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Fennel fronds


Alex
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At today's Farmers Market I scored two beautiful fennel bulbs complete with stalks and voluminous fronds. I already use fennel fronds to illustrate alliteration, and I include them in bouquets (with fronds like these, who needs anemones?), but I'd like to expand my repertoire. Bon Appétit has a nice article about this, but I was wondering what folks here have to say.

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Similar to the Look Alike Cousins in Patty Duke - they work a lot texture wise and companion wise like dill. My access in this area is the wild in canyons - like them as a bed for baked fish or stuffed in the cavity of whole fish. Also as bed for roasted potatoes. Look forward to your experiments.

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Edited by heidih (log)
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Aaaaaargh.... but  straying off thread, which is my bent, we recently introduced a new dill plant to our herb garden.   Since then, we have plucked 5 small (half inch California brown) slugs from the foliage.   What's up?   Is dill a slug banquet?   No other herb from this nursery has ever brought in a predator.    Thoughts?  

eGullet member #80.

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16 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Aaaaaargh.... but  straying off thread, which is my bent, we recently introduced a new dill plant to our herb garden.   Since then, we have plucked 5 small (half inch California brown) slugs from the foliage.   What's up?   Is dill a slug banquet?   No other herb from this nursery has ever brought in a predator.    Thoughts?  

You like French cuisine, Think of those snails feasting on fennel before harvest. Dill in a pinch good enough for slugs. If you can,  get rid of mulch like debris around plants where they like to hide till night.

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3 minutes ago, heidih said:

You like French cuisine, Think of those snails feasting on fennel before harvest. Dill in a pinch good enough for slugs. If you can,  get rid of mulch like debris around plants where they like to hide till night.

Aaaaaaargh...slugs are not snails, which also rate medium on my favorite food scale.    Yes, we should dig around the base of the plant.   Funny that three other plants bought at the same time have no hitchhikers, so far.   As with everything, different strokes for garden pests as well as humans.   

eGullet member #80.

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23 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Aaaaaaargh...slugs are not snails, which also rate medium on my favorite food scale.    Yes, we should dig around the base of the plant.   Funny that three other plants bought at the same time have no hitchhikers, so far.   As with everything, different strokes for garden pests as well as humans.   

If you google you will see snails and slugs like both plants. If they were babes carried in (often on underside of container) they may figure "hey good snacking here - why move on.

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21 minutes ago, heidih said:

If you google you will see snails and slugs like both plants. If they were babes carried in (often on underside of container) they may figure "hey good snacking here - why move on.

Right.   Unfortunately for them, they, small as they are, stand out against the ferny stems of dill, and are picked off daily or hourly as we encounter them.  

eGullet member #80.

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