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Deseeding 2000 Pounds Of Berries


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I need to deseed about 2000 pounds of raspberries and blackberries each year and will need to do strawberry next year. Using a sieve for 5 pounds at a time is a nightmare. Steam juicing is slightly easier but we can still only do 5-6 pounds at a time. 

 

I know there's a better way but over the last 6 weeks I've spent hours and hours on Google trying to figure out if such a machine exists and what it is called, and I'm stuck. 

 

What do jelly companies use?

 

Does anyone have any ideas?

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is that 2,000 lbs aka one ton _each_ of black/rasp/straw-berries?

 

that is way over and above anything typically done 'in the home'

 

commercially - the berries are cooked, the "pulp" rises to the surface and gets skimmed off.

the "juice" is captured. 

the skimmed solids are pressed on a very fine screen, recovering some juice.

waste "solids" may be processed through a rotational separator.

none of those kinds of equipments are designed for "home use"

 

in large scale operations, there is a serious "waste" factor.   they trade waste for speed.

whether your operation can support that kind of waste factor . . . can no say...

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We used to strain juice for jelly through a pillowcase. Big advantage was you could hang it up and let it drip, go away and come back after while.

 

Maybe a big, big fabric bag...cord to gather at the top ... something sturdy enough to hang it from...big enough container to hold the juice? And enough time to do something else while it drips? Should be able to handle maybe 25 pounds at a whack.

 

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I don't know if it could be used for fruit/seeds but I've used food grade mesh nylon bags with good success.  They make them in different mesh sizes and hold about 5 gallons at a time.  After adding the fruit, you can hold the open end and give the bag a spin which will create a lot of gentle pressure.

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29 minutes ago, KennethT said:

There's also the old school "grape-stomping" method... but I don't know about the yield.

 

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11 hours ago, DJ Silverchild said:

Does anyone have any ideas?

 

Make Jam.

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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17 hours ago, AlaMoi said:

is that 2,000 lbs aka one ton _each_ of black/rasp/straw-berries?

 

that is way over and above anything typically done 'in the home'

 

commercially - the berries are cooked, the "pulp" rises to the surface and gets skimmed off.

the "juice" is captured. 

the skimmed solids are pressed on a very fine screen, recovering some juice.

waste "solids" may be processed through a rotational separator.

none of those kinds of equipments are designed for "home use"

 

in large scale operations, there is a serious "waste" factor.   they trade waste for speed.

whether your operation can support that kind of waste factor . . . can no say...

 

17 hours ago, AlaMoi said:

is that 2,000 lbs aka one ton _each_ of black/rasp/straw-berries?

 

that is way over and above anything typically done 'in the home'

 

commercially - the berries are cooked, the "pulp" rises to the surface and gets skimmed off.

the "juice" is captured. 

the skimmed solids are pressed on a very fine screen, recovering some juice.

waste "solids" may be processed through a rotational separator.

none of those kinds of equipments are designed for "home use"

 

in large scale operations, there is a serious "waste" factor.   they trade waste for speed.

whether your operation can support that kind of waste factor . . . can no say...

Oh my god thank you. Thank you so much.ive I've scoured the internet for a year to figure out how deserting is done commercially. 

 

A few asked what this is for: I am trying to scale up my cannabis infused pate de fruit because for testing purposes small batches are cost prohibitive. We try to only use locally sourced fruit. Commercially prepared is really not something we want to avoid. (that said weather has caused such massive crop loss that might change this year).

Currently we cast in a frame. We'd like to go to a small depositor from Lloynds and those choke on a seed. 

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@DJ Silverchild Interesting. I assume you're adding a canna butter to a basic pate de fruit recipe? Or are you using a distillate based extract? I'm curious how they might affect your recipe?

 

Also, can you put a filter in front of the depositor feed rather than prefiltering the juice?

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On 7/29/2021 at 1:07 PM, KennethT said:

@DJ Silverchild Interesting. I assume you're adding a canna butter to a basic pate de fruit recipe? Or are you using a distillate based extract? I'm curious how they might affect your recipe?

 

Also, can you put a filter in front of the depositor feed rather than prefiltering the juice?

We do not use cannabutter and our pate comes out fine. It doesn't seem to effect anything  

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I'm guessing you'll find the best answers in farming small industrial food manufacturer forum. Most of us here have scales that go up to a few kilograms. 

 

If you learn the best way to do this, I'd love to hear it. Out of totally random curiosity. 

Notes from the underbelly

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