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Chinese Pickles and Preserves


liuzhou
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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

Thanks. I would have to be extremely desperate to make a snack of dried fish. I’m probably missing something very good!  

@Peter Green's daughter Serena was quite fond of them. The bags at Korean market do tempt me. (Serena's mom is Korean) Dried squid strips are a sort of tame entry point. Nice snack. My ex's trainer had him off meat but allowed the squid "jerky". He liked it (American redneck white boy)

Edited by heidih (log)
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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

How are the other fish generally used? 

 

The yellowtail shad is sometimes sold, mislabelled as salted anchovies. But do make a good substitute, unless of course you are one of the anchovy haters. Me, I love 'em.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Apparently quite different 

 

Quite taximetrically dissimilar from our shad, Alosa sapidissima.

 

 

Well, many non-scientific fish names are surprisingly imprecise. Anchovies, for example, comprise over than 140 species  in 17 genera, according to some accounts.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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30. 肉松 (ròu sōng) - Pork Floss

 

rousong.thumb.jpg.defc520f740c522bcf365e1de6a8ae04.jpg

肉松 (ròu sōng) - Pork Floss

 

When I posted regarding preserved meat products earlier, I had this in mind, but didn’t have any to hand. You’ll see why in the next paragraph.

 

To quote myself from something I wrote in 2012

 

Quote

Rousong (肉松) is also known as meat floss, pork floss etc. It is a form of dried pork which is made by boiling it for hours with soy sauce and other flavourings (including salt, sugar and MSG), shredding it then drying it. It resembles something you might expect to find being used as the stuffing in a mattress and tastes similar, but not quite that good.

 

It is served on top of congee (rice porridge) or rice, and stuffed into steamed buns, cakes and breads. It is even eaten as it is for a snack. I'd serve with it with c@rn, if I allowed either anywhere near my kitchen!
There is also a version made from fish - 鱼松 ( sōng). It smells and probably tastes like urine-soaked mattresses.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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4 hours ago, liuzhou said:

30. 肉松 (ròu sōng) - Pork Floss

 

rousong.thumb.jpg.defc520f740c522bcf365e1de6a8ae04.jpg

肉松 (ròu sōng) - Pork Floss

 

When I posted regarding preserved meat products earlier, I had this in mind, but didn’t have any to hand. You’ll see why in the next paragraph.

 

To quote myself from something I wrote in 2012

 

 

It is served on top of congee (rice porridge) or rice, and stuffed into steamed buns, cakes and breads. It is even eaten as it is for a snack. I'd serve with it with c@rn, if I allowed either anywhere near my kitchen!
There is also a version made from fish - 鱼松 ( sōng). It smells and probably tastes like urine-soaked mattresses.

 

Personally, I'm a fan of the meat floss.  I don't think I've had pork floss (maybe packaged on EVA Airlines as an accompaniment to the congee - but it could have been fish floss), but I've had a couple different types of beef floss in Indonesia and enjoyed them - I wouldn't want a whole meal of them (I don't think they'd ever be used that way anyway) but as a condiment they're great.

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Just now, KennethT said:

Personally, I'm a fan of the meat floss.  I don't think I've had pork floss (maybe packaged on EVA Airlines as an accompaniment to the congee - but it could have been fish floss), but I've had a couple different types of beef floss in Indonesia and enjoyed them - I wouldn't want a whole meal of them (I don't think they'd ever be used that way anyway) but as a condiment they're great.

 

I have many friends here who like it  a lot, but it escapes me!

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19 hours ago, Anna N said:

Thanks. I would have to be extremely desperate to make a snack of dried fish. I’m probably missing something very good!  

In Newfoundland, both capelin (somewhat in the smelt/sardine continuum) and squid are enjoyed as snacks, both lightly salted and then dried.

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"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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1 minute ago, chromedome said:

In Newfoundland, both capelin (somewhat in the smelt/sardine continuum) and squid are enjoyed as snacks, both lightly salted and then dried.

Ain’t no accounting for tastes. :laugh:

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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31. 农家柴火丸子 (nóng jiā chái huo wán zi) – Peasant Family Firewood Balls

 

2099186544_tofublood1.thumb.jpg.631eab9ec386049b4c474410027ffd6d.jpg

 

Now, I know you are looking at the picture and thinking “they’re not balls”, and of course, you’re right. But that’s their name (sometimes they are balls). They’re not firewood, either. Or made by peasant families; at least these ones weren’t.

What they are is firewood smoked tofu and pigs’ blood sausages. The ingredients as listed are: Soy beans, water, pork, pigs’ blood, vegetable oil, salt, chilli, Sichuan peppercorn, star anise and cassia bark.

They are a speciality of Hunan, especially 邵阳 (shào yáng), a city in the south-west of the province.
 

tofu blood2.jpg


These I like.

There is video on their preparation and usage here.

ht

 

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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@liuzhou -- I have no experience with blood sausage. I do know that blood has a metallic taste (or at least human blood does, an experience borne of sticking a cut finger in my mouth, which is certainly not the most sanitary practice, but it hasn't killed me...yet). Does whatever cooking/curing the blood sausage goes through do away with the metallic taste? The cut sections you show above look fairly tasty. Are they eaten by themselves as a snack, in a prepared dish, or with a condiment?

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

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6 minutes ago, kayb said:

@liuzhou -- I have no experience with blood sausage. I do know that blood has a metallic taste (or at least human blood does, an experience borne of sticking a cut finger in my mouth, which is certainly not the most sanitary practice, but it hasn't killed me...yet). Does whatever cooking/curing the blood sausage goes through do away with the metallic taste? The cut sections you show above look fairly tasty. Are they eaten by themselves as a snack, in a prepared dish, or with a condiment?

 

 

That last blood sausage is always cooked, usually in dishes as shown in the video I linked to. The main Hunan condiment, if you call it that, is chilli.

 

That said, those tofu and blood sausages contain minimal amounts of blood compared with most blood sausages around the world.

I do not detect any metallic taste in any blood sausage, but that may differ for other people.

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32. 泡椒 (pào jiāo) – Pickled Chilli Peppers; 辣椒干 (là jiāo gān) – Dried Chilli Peppers

 

When Peter Piper picked his peck of pickled peppers, he probably didn’t realise that a peck wouldn’t last a day in the average Sichuan or Hunan kitchen. Both provinces use copious amounts of both dried and pickled peppers, as do Guizhou and Northern Guangxi.

These are often made at home but can also be found in every market and supermarket.

 

20180418_145840.thumb.jpg.fe16fdb939841e759c9411de763433fb.jpg

My downstairs neighbour is drying these outside her apartment window right now.

 

1643492326_DriedChillies2018.thumb.jpg.840dde59549a99708131aacd5f10d94b.jpg

Sichuan Dried Peppers

 

1910868935_DriedPointingtoHeavenChillies.thumb.jpg.d61c849d9ea121a75293cacf8040c5db.jpg

Dried "Pointing to Heaven" chillies - 指天椒 (zhǐ tiān jiāo)

 

841557207_peppersdrying.thumb.jpg.9b6e4dde3f47f6e51df2ead7c0b52954.jpg

米椒 (mǐ jiāo, literally 'rice peppers') drying in the sun.

 

paojiao.thumb.jpg.32c6f726f94ef639105328cae8a5e1d7.jpg

Pickled Peppers

 

qingpaojiao.thumb.jpg.f891eb136ec7a18422657ea836d1fc2b.jpg

Pickled Small Green Peppers

 

2121674772_.thumb.jpg.6f873a5d00be446271613abe8ee1a37c.jpg

Commercially produced 小米椒 (xiǎo mǐ jiāo) - Pickled Small Rice Peppers

 

1621169021_2.thumb.jpg.a0411ecbbe59568094e80aeaf14f8cd7.jpg

Commercially produced 小米椒 (xiǎo mǐ jiāo) - Pickled Small Rice Peppers

 

1694400053_lanternpeppersauce.thumb.jpg.a9c52bb3b72222821d56d7d2bf90b91f.jpg

辣椒酱 (dēng lóng là jiāo jiàng) - Lantern Chilli Paste (very hot!)

 

There are many more, to which I shall doubtless return.

 

pickled lantern chillis1.jpg

酸辣椒.jpg

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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