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liuzhou

liuzhou

4. 泡菜

 

泡菜 (pào cài) has a confusing etymology. ((pào) means 'bubble' or 'steeped; soaked'. Together with  (cài) meaning 'vegetable' it means 'pickled vegetable'. I can imagine the name comes from the pickling liquid bubbling as things ferment; or maybe it just means the vegetable is steeped or soaked in that same liquid. Or both. Take your pick.

 

Whatever, the name covers all wet-pickled vegetables (including the suancai above). That said the most common use of the name is for this:

 

Pickles.thumb.jpg.38aec53c27b957529e32dafc0eeb3a7f.jpg

 

It normally consists of cabbage or mustard leaf with daikon radish, carrots, chilis and ginger , but there are many variations.

 

It is usually served as a pre-meal appetiser or palate-cleanser, but sometimes with the main meal. Available all over China, but often associated with Sichuan where it is particularly popular. The example pictured above is a commercial product and is pickled in rice vinegar with some spices, the most common method. Some are done in a brine.

Here is my own home-made version. Same vegetables as I listed above (cabbage rather than mustard, here), done in rice vinegar with green Sichuan peppercorns.

361745874_paocai1024.thumb.jpg.9dca718645845a16b0084a87c25520d6.jpg

 

liuzhou

liuzhou

3. 泡菜

 

泡菜 (pào cài) has a confusing etymology. ((pào) means 'bubble' or 'steeped; soaked'. Together with  (cài) meaning 'vegetable' it means 'pickled vegetable'. I can imagine the name comes from the pickling liquid bubbling as things ferment; or maybe it just means the vegetable is steeped or soaked in that same liquid. Or both. Take your pick.

 

Whatever, the name covers all wet-pickled vegetables (including the suancai above). That said the most common use of the name is for this:

 

Pickles.thumb.jpg.38aec53c27b957529e32dafc0eeb3a7f.jpg

 

It normally consists of cabbage or mustard leaf with daikon radish, carrots, chilis and ginger , but there are many variations.

 

It is usually served as a pre-meal appetiser or palate-cleanser, but sometimes with the main meal. Available all over China, but often associated with Sichuan where it is particularly popular. The example pictured above is a commercial product and is pickled in rice vinegar with some spices, the most common method. Some are done in a brine.

Here is my own home-made version. Same vegetables as I listed above (cabbage rather than mustard, here), done in rice vinegar with green Sichuan peppercorns.

361745874_paocai1024.thumb.jpg.9dca718645845a16b0084a87c25520d6.jpg

 

liuzhou

liuzhou

泡菜 (pào cài) has a confusing etymology. ((pào) means 'bubble' or 'steeped; soaked'. Together with  (cài) meaning 'vegetable' it means 'pickled vegetable'. I can imagine the name comes from the pickling liquid bubbling as things ferment; or maybe it just means the vegetable is steeped or soaked in that same liquid. Or both. Take your pick.

 

Whatever, the name covers all wet-pickled vegetables (including the suancai above). That said the most common use of the name is for this:

 

Pickles.thumb.jpg.38aec53c27b957529e32dafc0eeb3a7f.jpg

 

It normally consists of cabbage or mustard leaf with daikon radish, carrots, chilis and ginger , but there are many variations.

 

It is usually served as a pre-meal appetiser or palate-cleanser, but sometimes with the main meal. Available all over China, but often associated with Sichuan where it is particularly popular. The example pictured above is a commercial product and is pickled in rice vinegar with some spices, the most common method. Some are done in a brine.

Here is my own home-made version. Same vegetables as I listed above (cabbage rather than mustard, here), done in rice vinegar with green Sichuan peppercorns.

361745874_paocai1024.thumb.jpg.9dca718645845a16b0084a87c25520d6.jpg

 

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