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What recipe do you want to be remembered for?


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My two children.

 

More on topic - my "killer crab" recipe. Not so much because I want it to be, but I know it will be what people here will remember.

Basically, it's blue crabs in a very spicy, garlicky base with oyster sauce.

 

1678557454_KensKillerCrab.thumb.jpg.e149f9fce680334bcba2cc56d7fe78bf.jpg

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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My baklava with Linzer bars running close second. It is how people remember me. Really my mom's but she has been gone so long I am now the baker associated.

Edited by heidih (log)
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11 hours ago, liuzhou said:

My two children.

 

 

You know, I was going to add "and tell us how you make it" to the original post, now I'm really glad I didn't. lol

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For me, it will probably be the Saturday morning pancakes for a bunch of screaming girls after a sleepover. Good times. 

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That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

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I guess that mine would be anchovy dip. Two ingredients that I always have in my fridge. Takes five minutes to make and out the door. I never take it anywhere that I don't get asked for the recipe.

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I'd guess for most of us, there is an overlap between what we want to be remembered for and what we will be remembered for.  And another one between our recipes and family/friend recipes that we've been a conduit for.  

 

I know I'll be remembered for my turkey gravy, my PB cookies, and my Dream Cookies.  The turkey gravy is a group project between my MIL, my own experiments, and everything I've ever read about making stock and gravy.  It's special because I started out as a newly married cook (age 23) making truly lousy gravy.  Over the years, with help and practice, I've developed gravy so good that I actually brag about it.  My PB cookies are things that I've worked on since I was about 14 years old.  Dream cookies are from a Family Circle magazine cookbook series and they aren't really mine at all.  Other than sometimes adding chopped nuts or cinnamon, I haven't changed the recipe at all.  But I remember making them with my mom when I was a little girl and they are the favorite cooky of our household.  They somehow mean something.  I'd like to be remembered for my spectacular fried chicken or my perfect cake.  But I'm not there yet with either of them, so I'll keep working on them.  

 

Of course, in some circles I will forever be remembered for Taco Dip.  Taco dip is simply the slow cooker Velveeta/Rotel/ground beef dip that I, years ago, made "My Own" by using a bottle of salsa and adding a tube of breakfast sausage.  I took it to a gathering and the little girls, who are now adults, still remember it and request it. 🙄😄 You can't control things like that!  

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Tater tots and chicken patty with cheese sauce.

 

Kids asked "what's the stuff on the chicken?"

 

Exasperated, I said  "Snot...eat it".

 

A family favorite from then through middle school.

 

Had a British pub feel to the name I always thought.

 

 

 

Edited by gfweb (log)
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17 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Had a British pub feel to the name I always thought.

Maybe not a pub but perhaps a sequel to Downton Abbey. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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19 minutes ago, Kim Shook said:

I'd guess for most of us, there is an overlap between what we want to be remembered for and what we will be remembered for.  And another one between our recipes and family/friend recipes that we've been a conduit for.  

 

Well put on the overlap. There is one kid (now 30) who still hankers for my salsa when I see him around town. A friend who accidentally got pregnant with child #2 at 42 (I thought I was in menopause she muttered !!!) whose hubby is picky bout gravy so when Catherine was born I made the gravy for several holidays and Paul picked it up and left us eggnog from https://www.broguieresmilk.com/location/. I still send her a text on T-Giving morn with a gravy prayer as she does on her own now. She feels she does not measure but but no complaints from the Mr. My god-daughter Monique's grammy who is 100 still always mentions my green soup from an Easter brunch as does her middle son. The list is long. 

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7 minutes ago, heidih said:

I made the gravy for several holidays

Strange, I never even thought of gravy because growing up in Midwest (gravy land) knowing how to make gravy is just essential knowledge. Every young girl was told "if you don't know how to make gravy, girl, you aren't going to survive". However, when I go to somebody's house for Thanksgiving or Christmas I am always asked to make the gravy. One of my contributions to the dinner is always plenty of good, rich, homemade chicken broth. I even tuck in a small bag of flour now because I went to one woman's house and she had absolutely nothing in the house to thicken it with.

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16 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

Strange, I never even thought of gravy because growing up in Midwest (gravy land) knowing how to make gravy is just essential knowledge. Every young girl was told "if you don't know how to make gravy, girl, you aren't going to survive". However, when I go to somebody's house for Thanksgiving or Christmas I am always asked to make the gravy. One of my contributions to the dinner is always plenty of good, rich, homemade chicken broth. I even tuck in a small bag of flour now because I went to one woman's house and she had absolutely nothing in the house to thicken it with.

I grew up with a mother who was the daughter of a lousy cook who was also the daughter of a lousy cook 😄.  Because she liked good food, my mom grew into a good, plain cook - meat, potatoes, vegetables.  But nothing that really required much "mixing".  No casseroles, no sauces, no baking.  And her gravy, under the influence of an English husband, was always Bisto, even with chicken (no chicken Bisto in those days).  

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16 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

Strange, I never even thought of gravy because growing up in Midwest (gravy land) knowing how to make gravy is just essential knowledge. Every young girl was told "if you don't know how to make gravy, girl, you aren't going to survive".

Years ago, many, my m-i-l watched me make gravy (whisking flour into drippings, then adding and whisking in liquid) and asked me how i ever learned to make it that way.  She used the slurry method.   I told her from my mother.   I related our conversation to my mother, who looked at me as if I were mad, and replied that she NEVER made it that way, that she always used a slurry.    HUH?    I guess i extrapolated from white sauce method, but I stand by it as it results in silky, lump free gravy.   (My mother ALWAYS strained her gravy. 

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eGullet member #80.

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I can't think of any special recipe that I'm good at, but the grand-kids can be coaxed into eating things they think they don't like when their mom tells them "Ama made this." 

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eGullet member #80.

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1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I told her from my mother.

That reminds me of the story of the mother that was  teaching  her daughter how to cook a roast. She cut off 1/3 of it and placed it beside the bigger piece before she put it in the oven. The daughter asked her why she did it that way and she said that that was the way that her mother did it. After discussing it they called the grandmother to ask why she did it. She replied that that was the way her mother always did it. Since the great grandmother was still alive they called her to ask why she did it and she told them that she had to do it that way because her roasting pan was too small.

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5 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

That reminds me of the story of the mother that was  teaching  her daughter how to cook a roast. She cut off 1/3 of it and placed it beside the bigger piece before she put it in the oven. The daughter asked her why she did it that way and she said that that was the way that her mother did it. After discussing it they called the grandmother to ask why she did it. She replied that that was the way her mother always did it. Since the great grandmother was still alive they called her to ask why she did it and she told them that she had to do it that way because her roasting pan was too small.

I just told Mr. Kim this story to illustrate something (I've forgotten what).

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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

And her gravy, under the influence of an English husband, was always Bisto,

When I was first married, I couldn't make biscuits to save my soul. I made some of the best hockey pucks you ever saw. Then after I had been married about a year, a girl from Oklahoma moved in next door. She made gorgeous biscuits, breakfast lunch and dinner. So I asked for her Secret and she reached into the cupboard and pulled out a box of Bisquick. From then on I could make great biscuits. Then I moved to Costa Rica where there was no Bisquick and it was back to hockey pucks until I finally got the hang of it. Now I'm kind of famous for my good biscuits but it's funny how we rely on some ready-mades because they're a lot better than we could possibly make on our own.

Edited by Tropicalsenior (log)
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