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What is "America-don" to you?


cteavin
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Baked beans = regional. Noit in my oart of the US.  American  as others have noted "American" does not have a narrow focus of food

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12 hours ago, FeChef said:

If im trying to understand this better......Kraft mac and cheese, topped with baked beans, and sliced hot dogs. I dare you to find something more American......

 

I accept your challenge.

 

Picture it: A dozen strips of sweet 'n smoky bacon laid out into one sheet. Spread a thick layer of Kraft Mac and Cheese and roll it into a log. Slice it, bread it, (deep) fry it. Put it between two slices of Wonder Bread and serve it with Ranch Dressing and BBQ sauce and a (diet) Coke. 

 

Can anyone top that? ;)

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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

I won't do it, but I'd really love to see the reactions of folks if I decided to trash the foods of other cultures here on eG.  

 

Who's "trashing"?  I'm not trashing, I freakin' love cheese, bacon, and huge portions 😂

 

While blue crab may be special in the mid-Atlantic states and Dungeness crab may be special in the Northwest, it's the lowest common denominator that ends up defining us - Applebee's, McDonald's, Cheesecake Factory.  Yes, there is SO MUCH more and better including regional cuisines and our rich immigrant cultures, but I don't mind taking a lighthearted view towards mass market food habits.

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8 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I won't do it, but I'd really love to see the reactions of folks if I decided to trash the foods of other cultures here on eG.  

 

Why do you think we/I am trashing US cuisine? Every culture's food has a stereotype and I invited humor, see the opening post, to an answer. I mean no offense, Kim, but you're overthinking it. 

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57 minutes ago, cteavin said:

 

Why do you think we/I am trashing US cuisine? Every culture's food has a stereotype and I invited humor, see the opening post, to an answer. I mean no offense, Kim, but you're overthinking it. 

I am neither Japanese nor American but yet I do not think that @Kim Shookis overthinking it. 
Oyakodon is an iconic Japanese dish but when I read the posts here it would seem there is a determination to dig up the very worst American stereotypes in order to make the dish American. I find myself shuddering for all my American friends although I am sure they are capable of dealing with it without my help. This is just an opinion from an outsider. Carry-on. You are just as entitled to your opinion as I am to mine. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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As a US person I did not take offense but I just saw zero connection to the spirit of the original simple comfort dish. If we want to be silly (as invited) ok but the point is? - yup - no point - guess just fun? My kids of all ethnicities have enjoyed the classic and would walk from the spoofs.

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11 hours ago, cteavin said:

 

I accept your challenge.

 

Picture it: A dozen strips of sweet 'n smoky bacon laid out into one sheet. Spread a thick layer of Kraft Mac and Cheese and roll it into a log. Slice it, bread it, (deep) fry it. Put it between two slices of Wonder Bread and serve it with Ranch Dressing and BBQ sauce and a (diet) Coke. 

 

Can anyone top that? ;)

Don't just lay the bacon out,  weave the bacon together. https://barbecuebible.com/recipe/build-bacon-weave/  The mac&cheese needs jalapenos incorporated somehow.  There needs to be Tabasco sauce in the dish.  And I'd think about deep frying the mac&cheese in a tubular mold before wrapping the bacon weave around it and tying it on with a scallion. 

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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

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29 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I am neither Japanese nor American but yet I do not think that @Kim Shookis overthinking it. 
Oyakodon is an iconic Japanese dish but when I read the posts here it would seem there is a determination to dig up the very worst American stereotypes in order to make the dish American. I find myself shuddering for all my American friends although I am sure they are capable of dealing with it without my help. This is just an opinion from an outsider. Carry-on. You are just as entitled to your opinion as I am to mine. 

 

To me, this topic has become interesting in very different way. 

 

Comedy is largely blowing up stereotypes. Globally, American food is equated with fast food, so much so that Globalization, at least for a time, means/meant Americanization. I've traveled all over and I've seen these stereotypes -- in food -- used in good fun. All of the humorous examples here play on those stereotypes: fast food, deep fried, smothered in cheese, ranch dressing, bbq sauce, etc. Why is it offensive if the intent is humor? I really don't understand why one would be offended. 

 

The other half of the question is if someone is offended, should the conversation stop -- and I am ONLY talking about food. 

 

I hope all people who have peaked in here know I mean no offense. 

 

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1 minute ago, cteavin said:

The other half of the question is if someone is offended, should the conversation stop -- and I am ONLY talking about food. 

No one as far as I know suggested that the conversation should stop. Differing opinions should be tolerated.

 

Humour is very tricky. When a need arises to insist on it then you can be fairly certain it has fallen flat somewhere. 

 

I will happily bow out since I have no dog in this race. It seemed important to show that @Kim Shookwas not the only one feeling uncomfortable. 

 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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18 minutes ago, Anna N said:

No one as far as I know suggested that the conversation should stop. Differing opinions should be tolerated.

 

Humour is very tricky. When a need arises to insist on it then you can be fairly certain it has fallen flat somewhere. 

 

I will happily bow out since I have no dog in this race. It seemed important to show that @Kim Shookwas not the only one feeling uncomfortable. 

 

 

Well, I thank you for your contribution and I apologize for singling Kim out. 

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26 minutes ago, Anna N said:

No one as far as I know suggested that the conversation should stop. Differing opinions should be tolerated.

 

Humour is very tricky. When a need arises to insist on it then you can be fairly certain it has fallen flat somewhere. 

 

I will happily bow out since I have no dog in this race. It seemed important to show that @Kim Shookwas not the only one feeling uncomfortable. 

 

Not at all "uncomfortable" but sad that the suggestions showed so little insight into traditional American food.    There was daily fare for 200 years before McDo et Cie.   

eGullet member #80.

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I did try to give a serious answer and be respectful of the original dish with my suggestion but I do see both sides of it because internationally and especially in Asia most of what they 'know' about American food they learn from the American chain restaurants that are all over the biggest cities like Starbucks, KFC, McDonalds, Pizza Hut ect. So it's not too surprising that our rep is one of culinary excess. 

 

OTOH There is more to the American food than fast food and we don't need to lean into stereotype just for laughs.

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I understand that this topic might get some emotional replies. At the same time, I doubt it was intended to be a trashing of one’s cuisine by the OP - I see it more of a intellectual challenge how a dish would conceptually look if it was transplanted into another cuisine.

 

If I want to make an “Italian” meatball, I use maybe basil, garlic, parmigiano and simmer in tomato sauce. A “Thai” meatball could have lemongrass, fish sauce and some sugar added, and gets grilled over charcoal. You get the idea - it’s what people who enjoy cooking play with. That doesn’t mean that I reduce the respective cuisine to these few ingredients in that specific dish. Nor is it by any means authentic.

 

That a few ingredients pop up as a representative of American cuisine might not be correct in everyones eues, but it seems the connotation peoe have. When I suggested the “Eggs Benedict” don, the chicken bacon association popped up in my head first. I do know that there is more to American cuisine than bacon, but would it wrong to choose it as an representative for American cuisine in this Gedankenexperiment ?

 

Personally, I would not feel offended if someone makes a “German” don by adding chicken Nuremberger sausage, Eierstich and some Sauerkraut as the pickle on the side. Sure, it serves many stereotypes, even those used by some in a derogatory way towards my home country, but because I know that there is so much more I couldn’t feel offended. 
 

Sorry for pushing my opinion here, but I liked the idea to transplant a dish into an unusual set of ingredients. And if “stereotype” ingredients pop up (and be it mac & cheese) and get elaborated on, that’s part of the fun, too - at least for me 🤗

 

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In agreement with Duvel and hoping others realize that the OP had no ill intent in their post.  If we cannot find humor in food traditions (or even atrocities - see; doughnut encrusted deep fried burgers and the like :shudder:), especially in this day and age when the tone is so serious out in the 'real world' - then I believe some fresh air is certainly in order!

 

As a proud Canadian, you are welcome to stereotype us with our poutine, maple syrup, fried beaver tales, back bacon, raw seal blubber, etc etc etc - I take no offense.  In fact, in all humor there are slivers of truth.  Our food culture would partially consist of Poutine, topped with beaver tales, grilled back bacon, drizzled maple syrup and perhaps some fried moose balls to top it all of. 

 

Granted for those who wished to truly understand us and our food traditions they can dig deeper below the surface and the generalizations to find (and enjoy) a lot more, but that is up to each individual. 

 

 

 

 

 

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I need to apologize.  I hate drama and I know I caused some.  Of course everyone should go ahead and enjoy themselves on this topic - I know it wasn't mean spirited.  All I can say is that I've been a bit fragile just lately and it hit me wrong.  My problem and no one else's.  It's a reason, but not an excuse.  Please do accept my apology and carry on.  

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3 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I need to apologize.  I hate drama and I know I caused some.  Of course everyone should go ahead and enjoy themselves on this topic - I know it wasn't mean spirited.  All I can say is that I've been a bit fragile just lately and it hit me wrong.  My problem and no one else's.  It's a reason, but not an excuse.  Please do accept my apology and carry on.  

No need for apologies!  Life is tough for everyone right now and little things can easily set us off (which previously would never have).  I think over the last 24 months we have all had our fragile moments (I sure have) and it impacts everyone differently.  Kudos to you for being able to identify whats going on - many would simply internalize and continue on. 

 

Oh, and another fun Canadian-don - I have had numerous people in various travels around the world ask if we live in Igloos and eat seals/polar bears.  Go figure ;)

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8 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I need to apologize.  I hate drama and I know I caused some.  Of course everyone should go ahead and enjoy themselves on this topic - I know it wasn't mean spirited.  All I can say is that I've been a bit fragile just lately and it hit me wrong.  My problem and no one else's.  It's a reason, but not an excuse.  Please do accept my apology and carry on.  

the problem, it seems to me, is that we are many of use very quick to equate American food with what is basically American junk food. Truly this is unfair and I too realize how complicated and uncomfortable it is to drop further down the rabbit hole. You have no reason to apologize. 

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Posted (edited)
On 6/3/2021 at 7:29 AM, cteavin said:

 

I accept your challenge.

 

Picture it: A dozen strips of sweet 'n smoky bacon laid out into one sheet. Spread a thick layer of Kraft Mac and Cheese and roll it into a log. Slice it, bread it, (deep) fry it. Put it between two slices of Wonder Bread and serve it with Ranch Dressing and BBQ sauce and a (diet) Coke. 

 

Can anyone top that? ;)

Americans would never roll it into a log and bread it. Besides, the entire point of this thread is a bowl. I am dissapointed in you being from Japan, and not understanding the whole topic of this thread, that YOU created!

Edited by FeChef (log)
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, FeChef said:

I am not sure why you are argue this. Can you post any recipe from any other country that references "baked beans" maybe you never grew up with them, but, i would bet at least 80% of america has.

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/162697-the-great-british-food-myths/?do=findComment&comment=2300984

 

sausage menu.jpg

 

 

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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7 hours ago, FeChef said:

Heres another idea, Mac n Cheese, topped with Chili.

 

Let the Texans argue that one.

 

 

I'm originally from California and I've done this. Why create two bowls to wash when you only need one? :)

 

 

3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

...baked beans.

 

 

 

And to you both, I pulled out "James Beard's American Cookery" just now. On page 592 he goes into beans and all their variants. According to him, the colonists brought beans with them and the BBB evolved becoming The Quintessential American (Bean) Dish. I do recall reading elsewhere (long ago) that Romans ate beans as a part of their diet, so there's every reason to believe that versions of baked beans have existed in various forms all over the Western world. 

 

Now kiss and make up. 

 

 

 

 

 

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