Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Troubleshooting air bubbles in my soft caramel for bonbons!


Recommended Posts

Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ShylahSinger said:

Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.

 

How do you get the caramel into the molds?  With a pastry bag?  I don't recall seeing lots of bubbles in caramels I have made, but I would think the pressure of the piping would remove them.  You can also tap the molds on the counter after they are filled.  I use an immersion blender to add the softened butter to my caramel, but even that doesn't make bubbles I have noticed.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your response! 

I usually fill the molds by using a pastry bag. 

I made it starting dry method, adding cream, then butter. Simple, but could I have stirred too vigorously?

The second photo shows what it's like after stirring. 

Am I just being overly cautious?

 

20210525_145428.jpg

20210525_145438.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the "wet" method, but both involve much stirring (well, maybe less for the dry method).  I would not be disturbed by the bubbles in the photos.  Do bubbles still appear after you have piped?  Caramels (if not cooked to too high a temp) will settle into a cavity with time, leaving no air.  Although it is heresy to say this, you may be worrying needlessly.  I can't believe I wrote that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jim. Thanks for the reassurance. There are a few small bubbles that come to the top of the bonbons after they're filled; sometimes I'm able to pop them with a toothpick. Otherwise they seal well and no ones found any problems with them. I'm just trying to be careful with my technique--I would hate to poison on of my children!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Aw reading (free water, allowing for microbial growth) for my caramel with sea salt was 0.56.  According to experts, that means it will last for many months. 

 

As for poisoning your children, I don't think you will do it with caramel.  There may, of course, be times when you might wish for that outcome.

 

If you start making bonbons in quantity, you may want to look into freezing them (lots of info on how to do that on this forum).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there.. I make salted caramel using the dry method. I sometimes get a few bubbles in my caramel.. maybe it is my stirring technique too. I don't use a blender like Jim because my batches of caramel are relatively small (0.5 - 0.75kg), so I don't see the need, and because I don't want to clean it after, but I can't imagine it would cause an issue.

 

I use a pastry bag to fill my bonbons and then leave them in my cooler for a few hours or overnight before sealing. Most bubbles seem to disappear during the piping stage and 99% of any others seem to have gone by the time I come to seal the bonbons. As Jim says, the AW of caramel is generally super low so any bonbons should last for ages without risk to children! I have tested mine after 8 weeks and they were fine, though my production batches never last this long as these are one of my top sellers.

 

Enjoy your caramel.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Darienne
      A quite unusual take on the favorite American chocolate bar: click
    • By rookie
      I am making molded bunnies for Easter and I am finding that the
      necks are cracking and the head breaks away from the body. I have noticed that the neck is not as thick as the rest of the bunny. Total grams for this bunny is 200.
      Does anyone have any suggestions on how to rectify this? Oh yeah I didn't mention that after pouring into molds I place in the refridgerator.
      Any suggestions are welcome!
      Cheers
      Mary - Rookie
    • By cc.canuck
      I couldn't think of a better way to word that! 
       
      I'm experimenting with adding a very small amount of cocoa butter decoration onto bars I'm making and am not sure whether I should heat the moulds up with a hair dryer as I would for completely bare moulds or just abandoning this step. I would avoid blowing directly onto where the cocoa butter is as much as possible. Thoughts?

    • By liuzhou
      Full story here.
       
    • By cc.canuck
      I'm relatively new to chocolate making but now that I've finally got the hang of tempering (by hand using the seeding method) I'd like to work on incorporating less air during the process.
       
      I mainly make bars at the moment so I can tap out air bubbles after filling but I want to start making dipped biscuits and that's not going to work! I've watched oh so many videos of people stirring their chocolate while tempering and can't pick up any nuances that make their process different to mine, though they clearly have significantly less air in their mixture.
       
      Any ideas how I could fix this problem or should I consider incorporating air bubbles into my biscuit design?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...