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Removing aerosolized kitchen grease from delicate items


KennethT
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Back in 2006, after visiting the factory while in Chiang Mai, Thailand, my wife and I bought a bunch of carved celadon plates, bowls and a hand painted tea set (the dollar was really strong against the Thai Baht back then).  We've only used the tea set a few times just because it's so beautiful and we're afraid that constant use/washing will damage the paint - plus the tea pot looks rather delicate (even though it probably isn't) and we didn't want to risk damaging it either.

 

Rather than keeping it in a closet, we kept the set on a display shelf in the living room so we could at least enjoy it visually.

 

The problem is that the range hood in my old apartment sucked - or didn't, actually, so aerosolized grease landed practically everywhere except the bedroom which was closed off with a door whenever I was grilling or stir frying or basically doing anything.

 

We got around to unpacking the set yesterday and I carefully washed it in hot water using normal dish soap and then let it air dry on the drain rack. I used a fair bit of pressure, but I didn't want to use the green scrubby side.  After it had dried, there is still a thin film of dried grease in some spots.  Any good tricks/products to use to get it off that won't damage it?

 

20210523_084400_HDR.thumb.jpg.85fd9ea69a636154a4bb239a4e8f324e.jpg

 

I imagine the paint is tougher than it looks since it's baked on at like 3000 degrees but even still, I really don't want to take a chance.

Edited by KennethT (log)
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pick an idem

 

soak it in warm water w liquid dishsoap

 

and using your fingers rather than a dish-pad

 

see what happens.

 

I agree its tougher the n you think

 

if that doesn't work

 

try isopropyl alcohol on a tiny spot w a kleenex , as see if the finish 

 

is affected 

 

household white vinegar is a third option

Edited by rotuts (log)
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also, it's hard to test a chemical in an inconspicuous spot - the bottom isn't painted - just the top, so there isn't anywhere I can try a solvent without it being unnoticeable.

 

But, I'm thinking that a solvent would be fine. The paint/glaze is fired at super high temp (1300 degC) so I'd be really surprised if a solvent would remove it.

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3 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Acetone added to the above.

 

If it truly glazed I worry more about friction than solvent.

 

I think you're right. I have a lot of solvents - in addition to alcohol, acetone and mineral spirits,  I also have vapor degreasing grade perchloroethylene and xylene.

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Update: I tried isopropyl alcohol first (it's the least aggressive).  A gentle wipe with a soaked paper towel and then rinse/wash with tap hot water did the trick.  It is so shiny now!!!!

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