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Ice cream maker - any recipe ideas?


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I bought a Cuisinart ICE-21 recently and last night it got it's first trial. This is the 'Simple Chocolate Ice Cream' that's on the first page of the suggested recipes that came enclosed. Served together with some added choco sauce and macadamias. I have to say it was pretty knock-out :) The good strong plain cocoa powder really gives it some oomph. It would be interesting doing a blind test vs Haagan Dazs or Ben + Jerrys. My unscientific impression is that it doesn't taste inferior to either, and it would be interesting to test that. If anything it struck me as richer and punchier... It's not slimming food that's for sure, for a 1.2litre batch it includes a cup+ of sugar (1/2 + 1/3rd dark brown), and two cups of thick cream. But, everything in moderation. So I was wondering if anyone else has one, and what kind of recipes they might have enjoyed. Of course now my mind is racing with the possibilities: Chocolate-Orange is an obvious brown sugar hybrid. I'm also wondering whether incorporating brandy into a recipe might work ... :) Perhaps adding brandy soaked sliced cherries for an adults-only 'Black-Forest' style blend... So if anyone has any tips or suggestions I'd love to hear them! ---- The machine was about S$170. For people relo'ing over it could be worth considering bringing one as they cost about 1/2 that in 'the West'. The above batch of 1.2L cost roughly (this is an estimate, in S$, as we already had the cocoa, sugar, and vanilla brought from Europe). 3/4 cocoa powder - $1.50 1/2 cup granulated sugar -$0.25 1/3 cup dark brown sugar -$0.50 pinch salt 1 cup whole milk - $0.25 2 cups thick cream - $6.00 1/2 tsp vanilla extract - $0.25 So, about $8.75/1.2L or $4/pint! Now, if HD/B+Js is say $20/pt, that means the machine has paid for itself after about 5 uses. What I also like is the lack of fillers, gums, preservatives, and the like. It can do sorbets and frozen yoghurt too. p.s. One minor inconvenience is that you need to pre-freeze the mixer bowl which is about 6" high * 7" across. For many people here that is going to be quite a chunk of their freezer drawer. On the +side, it forced us to have a 'freezer audit' and dump a lot of old forgotten stuff. You can also buy models that require no pre-freezing of the bowl, rather they have in-built compressors (like a freezer!), but they are significantly more expensive, maybe $500+

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It shouldn't be much more difficult to make ice cream which is better than Ben & Jerry's; as much as I like those 2, I find their ice creams to be way too sweet for me.

 

Plenty of ideas over in various ice cream threads. Such as...

 

 

@paulraphael's web site will help too...https://under-belly.org/category/ice-cream/

 

Be careful with your use of booze, or your ice cream won't freeze well.

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Ice cream...my husband Ed loves it and I make it continuously in my little ICE-??..well, it's so old and so worn that the name and model are erased from the front.  I paid $5 for it 12 years ago in my favorite second-hand store in Moab, Utah.  It has the separate interior bowl which must be frozen.  

 

I have my own recipe mixture that I use, pretty much no matter what flavors I use.  It has no eggs and is based on cornstarch.  My ice cream mentor, @paulraphael gave this recipe to me many years ago.  (He's gone way past this simple recipe in the intervening years). 

 

As for flavors...well there's no end to them.  My two go-to cookbooks are David Lebovitz, The Perfect Scoop and Gail Damerow, Ice Cream! The Whole Scoop.  I also own Jeni Britton Bauer, Jeni's Splendid ice Cream at Home, but I must admit, I no longer use it at all.  Mostly for Ed I just make plain vanilla and add shards of dark chocolate to it.   For many years we held an Annual Dog Weekend at our farm for which I always made 6 different flavors to satisfy everyone.  I've also made ice creams as gifts for neighbors and for a friend who had to work weekends on site and supplied the dessert sometimes. 

 

Not sure what exactly you need to know that I can tell you. 

 

 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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2 hours ago, Darienne said:

I have my own recipe mixture that I use, pretty much no matter what flavors I use.  It has no eggs and is based on cornstarch.  My ice cream mentor, @paulraphael gave this recipe to me many years ago.  (He's gone way past this simple recipe in the intervening years). 

Would you be willing to share that recipe? I’ve tried searching many ways and don’t seem to be able to find anything that fits the description.🙂

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Sure.  

Recipe: Basic Cornstarch Ice Cream 

 

3 cups, a mixture of heavy cream and half & half.  (Ed likes his ice cream really rich and so I use 1/2 of each.  Left on my own, I'd use 2 cups half & half and only one cup of heavy cream.) 

3/4 cup sugar [use 1 tablespoon corn syrup in the mix]

Pinch of salt

3 tablespoons cornstarch

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

 

1. Heat most of the cream over medium-low heat with the sugar, corn syrup and salt until the sugar is dissolved.

2. In a little bowl, blend cornstarch and remaining cream.

3. Add cornstarch mixture to pot. Cook, stirring, until it starts to thicken.  I use the back of a large metal spoon to test for readiness. 

4.  Put the hot mixture into a metal bowl and sit in the sink of cold water.  When it cools slightly, add the vanilla.  

5. Chill in fridge over night.  Occasionally I'll put it into the freezer to cool instead. 

6. When cool, pour into an ice cream machine and churn according to the appliance instructions.

7.  Transfer finished churned ice cream into a container and add any inclusions at this point.  Cover the mixture with a sheet of plastic wrap and put it into the freezer for final hardening..

 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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It’s not difficult to make ice cream that’s better then anything store bought. Once you taste a really good chocolate flavour you suddenly realise everything else is really really dull. 
 

adding alcohol will inhibit churning so for things like alcohol soaked fruit you need to add those at the end as you remove it from the bowl to go into the freezer.commercial stuff uses flavouring to make “rum and raisin” style ice creams. 
 

‘’otherwise go nuts, I found coconut really fun to make. I’ve also added all sorts of things. If you can flavour the base into something or cut it up into small enough pieces to add it you can pretty much add it. Maker beware, you get really weird ideas… 

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Ruben Porto of icecreamscience.com is considered one of the gurus of ice cream.  He explains every detail and why things happen as they do and what various ingredients contribute.  He also has detailed reviews of all mainstream machines.  I love his ice cream, BUT one must be truly dedicated to the process and have an excellent digestive system that can accommodate the richness of the final product.  Making it according to his recipe requires standing at the stove for a long time, stirring constantly, keeping the mix within a very narrow temperature range.  A freezer that can go very low is a plus.  The resulting ice cream (especially the lemon curd) is delicious and has virtually no ice crystals; a very small serving at a time is adequate for most people as it is quite rich.  I have also tried his vanilla, hazelnut, coffee, ginger, chocolate, and pistachio recipes.  I skipped the recipe calling for crickets!

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My ice cream maker broke ... but before that I was known for making a nice ginger ice cream.

 

I don't have the recipe anymore, but I can tell you the ginger flavor comes from making a syrup on the stovetop boiled with shredded ginger in it.  I never even bothered to peel it! Strain thoroughly. 

 

The syrup has to cool of course, and is added to a regular "base" of your choosing during churning.

 

Yum Yum!

 

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9 minutes ago, Johntodd said:

My ice cream maker broke ... but before that I was known for making a nice ginger ice cream.

 

I don't have the recipe anymore, but I can tell you the ginger flavor comes from making a syrup on the stovetop boiled with shredded ginger in it.  I never even bothered to peel it! Strain thoroughly. 

 

The syrup has to cool of course, and is added to a regular "base" of your choosing during churning.

 

Yum Yum!

 

Speaking of ginger...I have a wonderful recipe called Triple Ginger Ice Cream.  It's on eGulllet recipes posted by FoodMan.  

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Ruben Porto of icecreamscience.com is considered one of the gurus of ice cream.  He explains every detail and why things happen as they do and what various ingredients contribute.  He also has detailed reviews of all mainstream machines.  I love his ice cream, BUT one must be truly dedicated to the process and have an excellent digestive system that can accommodate the richness of the final product.  Making it according to his recipe requires standing at the stove for a long time, stirring constantly, keeping the mix within a very narrow temperature range.  A freezer that can go very low is a plus.  The resulting ice cream (especially the lemon curd) is delicious and has virtually no ice crystals; a very small serving at a time is adequate for most people as it is quite rich.  I have also tried his vanilla, hazelnut, coffee, ginger, chocolate, and pistachio recipes.  I skipped the recipe calling for crickets!

 

@Ruben Porto has a number of ice cream posts here.

 

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yeah - we go around and around, again and again. It's easy, it's science, blah blah.

 

My suggestion is to pick up Dana's book (eG-friendly Amazon.com link) if you don't have it. Jeni's too (eG-friendly Amazon.com link).  They'll both explain ice cream and the making of it better than most of the stuff on the internet. And if you follow of any of the recipes in either of the books, you'll make good ice cream.

 

And read many of the threads here.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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@Darienne Thank you for sharing both the Basic Cornstarch Ice Cream recipe and the recommendation for the Triple Ginger Ice Cream recipe. I adapted the triple ginger recipe to the cornstarch base. I went with the 2 cream and 1 half and half, oh my is it rich! I’ll try your preferred amounts next time. My Cuisinart ICE-20 did a great job with it, I’ve had it for at least 5 years (also a thrift store find, I think it was all of $4), did a few “acceptable” batches from the user manual when I first got it, then lost interest because they were just acceptable. After today’s experience, I’m sure it was the “egginess” that put me off.

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