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Show us your latest cookbook acquisitions!


weinoo
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7 minutes ago, AAQuesada said:

sounds like it is from a similar tradition but a different book with a much earlier publication date. 

Time for a historical novel set in that time. Mexico is so much more complex than many further north have any understanding. Should you cook more from the referenced book - sure we would enjoy seeing/hearing in a dedicated topic :)

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I'll think about it! Lol should I do the classic -Pichón en su sangre? 🥰🐦kidding kidding, but I have made a couple easy things from there and I've been thinking about doing the manchamanteles.

 

 

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On 1/12/2022 at 4:30 PM, weinoo said:

Very excited this just came today...

 

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Published 1981. This is already a 2nd printing, 1982.

 

Any details?

Recipes perhaps?

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Completely a joke! I do love pigeon and that's a pretty classic French preparation but way too much of a wuss to butcher a live one. The one time I plucked birds it DID NOT go over well poor things lol. Really do love the depth and breadth of the recipes in the book though

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14 minutes ago, AAQuesada said:

Completely a joke! I do love pigeon and that's a pretty classic French preparation but way too much of a wuss to butcher a live one. The one time I plucked birds it DID NOT go over well poor things lol. Really do love the depth and breadth of the recipes in the book though

 

Its the sort of stuff that turned up on old banquet menus from the "Golden Age"

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14 hours ago, gfweb said:

Any details?

Recipes perhaps?

 

I'll get there...but on first few glances, many recipes will be familiar and similar to lots of Italian cookbook recipes. Actually, much "Italian food" theoretically could be kosher - once you leave out the pork stuff.  

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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On 1/14/2022 at 2:16 PM, gfweb said:

 

Any details?

Recipes perhaps?

 

You can view a list of the recipes and ingredients called for over on Eat Your Books here.

There's also a second volume by the same author, published in 1992.  EYB has not indexed that one yet.

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17 hours ago, AAQuesada said:

From Franzen just to give an  idea of what it's about 

 

 

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Thanks, would love to read more of your thoughts on Frantzen, i asked about it in a different thread but didn't get much there 🙂 
Some of my latest purchases - upper two found on abebooks used in great condition and a nice price, Jerome Banctel purchased new and at 

first glance really like it, very comprehensive on the recipes side and this is mainly what i like from the modern chef books (in french of course, no English version yet). 

 

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3 hours ago, oferl said:

Jerome Banctel purchased new and at 

first glance really like it, very comprehensive on the recipes side and this is mainly what i like from the modern chef books (in french of course, no English version yet). 

 Nice! I'm jealous, I think anything that Chiro Matsui does with Chefs has a good chance of being great -Astrance a Cooks book is maybe my favorite. 

So I haven't had much chance to look over the Franzen book but to give you my first thoughts it's organized like the Septime book ie: the first part is pictures of dishes and descriptions with recipes at the end written in a restaurant style manner (which I like). Of the recipes a lot of them look 'doable' fun and many of the components look like they are worth making / playing around with. I paid 110 pretax but worth it. On a global look I like the thought of the restaurant as European technique and ingredients inspired by Japanese kaiseki in format -this makes a lot of sense to me. 

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9 hours ago, AAQuesada said:

 Nice! I'm jealous, I think anything that Chiro Matsui does with Chefs has a good chance of being great -Astrance a Cooks book is maybe my favorite. 

So I haven't had much chance to look over the Franzen book but to give you my first thoughts it's organized like the Septime book ie: the first part is pictures of dishes and descriptions with recipes at the end written in a restaurant style manner (which I like). Of the recipes a lot of them look 'doable' fun and many of the components look like they are worth making / playing around with. I paid 110 pretax but worth it. On a global look I like the thought of the restaurant as European technique and ingredients inspired by Japanese kaiseki in format -this makes a lot of sense to me. 

My main interest in the modern books category is exactly the style you mentioned, European with heavy Japanese influence (or other asian kitchens), a lot of Kaiseki inspiration, Yakitori and Sushi in home cooking in recent years.

I do have i think most of Masui's books, i pretty much can't resist them 🙂 Altough last Kei 2 was a bit dissappointing, it's more of a very stunning pictures book and the recipes at the end are quite basic and confusing. Her latest Racine - Un Japonais a Reims is on the way and I regret not buying her past Yukawatan book when came out, as it seems to worth nowdays X10 (assuming there is someone willing to pay it "-)). 

I LOVE Sepia by Martin Benn, might be my favorite, bau.steine also very good, Dos Pallilos has fantastic recipes but leans more towards Chinese, My Way by Tim Rau nice and many recipes, Toyo and Sola bth from Masui, are quite nice, Toyo 

has that Kaiseki influence, i also want to purchase Donburi by Julien Lemarie, looks like a pretty simple Japanese influenced book.. 

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I have Sola, Sepia and Astrance from her. After that what would you recommend? I do love modern Paris cuisine from fine dining down to bristonomy and on down. I'd love to get something from Yannick Alleno  & he has a book with Masui; also curious about 'Ma cuisine de bistrot' from him as well. 

 

Do report back once you get the Racine book! it looks good. 

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18 hours ago, AAQuesada said:

I have Sola, Sepia and Astrance from her. After that what would you recommend? I do love modern Paris cuisine from fine dining down to bristonomy and on down. I'd love to get something from Yannick Alleno  & he has a book with Masui; also curious about 'Ma cuisine de bistrot' from him as well. 

 

Do report back once you get the Racine book! it looks good. 

I wish i bought in the past Alleno's French cooking big book when price was nicer.. I'm really impressed with Banctel so that would be my choice, it does 

have some Japanese influence btw but i'm yet to go through everything there. Le Clarence is also very nice, might be a bit simpler/classic cooking from Banctel and there should be also an English version now.. For an exceptional coffee table and less cookbook, Kei 2, i got them from amazon uk as it was the cheapest 

for me and fortunately under my country tax limits.. It seems to be still the best price out there, as for most of the Chef books i order.. 

 

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For some reason, those two Israeli books are selling for a ridiculous price (was 3$ when i ordered), price is still very low on Amazon, for those interested.

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Two new cookbooks for me.  First is Chad Robertson's Bread Book. This one was published on Dec 21, 2021.  Kind of an odd pub date for a cookbook.  I'm guessing it was delayed by issues we've all been reading about.  Last week, I listened to a Zoom author session via LA bookshop Nowserving with Chad, his co-author and Tartine bread director, Jennifer Latham, Anson Mills founder Glenn Roberts, and Carinsprings Mill founder Kevin Morse hosted by Evan Kleiman.  In spite of my failures to maintain starters, I was sucked in by all the veneration of heritage grains and ordered the book.  I have the Kindle version of his first bread book,Tartine Bread (eG-friendly Amazon.com link) but not the second, Tartine Book No. 3 (eG-friendly Amazon.com link).  There's a chapter for each of 14 master recipes:  his classic country bread, baguettes, slab breads, a white sandwich "kids' bread," flatbreads, buns, dinner rolls, rye bread, vegan bread, gluten-free bread, crisp breads, tortillas, pizza dough and fermented pasta. Compared with his first book, this one goes more deeply into particular types of wheat and other whole grain flours but does not have as many step-by-step photos of the process.   Each chapter also includes several recipes for dishes to make with the bread.  I have a selection of Cairnspring Mill flours in my shopping cart and we'll see if I pull the trigger and manage to actually bake anything!  

Nowserving generally archives these sessions on their "Event Recordings" page and I'll come back and update this if I see it. Here's a direct link to this Zoom event. If that link doesn't work, go back to that Event Recordings page and you'll find it listed on 1/26/2022.

 

My other "new" book was published in 2019, Double Awesome Chinese Food: Irresistible and Totally Achievable Recipes from Our Chinese-American Kitchen by Margaret Li, Irene Li and Andrew Li, siblings who started Boston food truck and Asian fusion restaurant Mei Mei Street Kitchen.  Kenji gave this one a shout out recently and it promptly disappeared from Amazon but their listing (eG-friendly Amazon.com link) still has a good bit of info on the book.  I thought some of the ideas and flavor combinations sounded like fun. I suspect I'll use this more for ideas than actually following recipes exactly but who knows?  I already made a version of their Double Awesome breakfast sandwich (fried eggs, cheddar cheese, greens and pesto in a scallion pancake) and their kimchi dog (also served in a scallion pancake will be happening here! 

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1 minute ago, AAQuesada said:

Dishoom is a great book! there was a great zoom talk on it from Now Serving in LA.

 

Event Recordings – Now Serving (nowservingla.com)


Ditto the thumbs up for Dishoom.  It's a delight to read even if you don’t cook from it.  I’ve cooked quite a bit from it and enjoyed everything. Some recipes are on the rich side but that’s often the nature of restaurant food. 
 

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  • 1 month later...

Wanted Flora by Nils Henkel for some time, found used in ok condition, still quite pricy maybe possible to find better in the future.. 
Vegetarian modern "michelin style" in German that looks promising and interesting but will have a better clue later after reading and a lot of translating..
Quite a lot of interesting modern chef books in German only, published in recent years, hope to find some of them in nicer prices later..  

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