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Show us your latest cookbook acquisitions!


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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

I totally agree with Gabrielle's voice (which I love) coming through in Prune and that it seems like her instructions for her restaurant dishes. I borrowed it and Blood Bones and Butter from my local library to read and probably will do so again until I break down and buy a copy.

 

I also enjoyed BB&B.  Do keep an eye out for Prune. I suspect you'd enjoy it, too. 

 

That's perfect, thanks!  These are the cookbooks I treasure most.  

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Not a 2021 book. But it's new to me and it is 2021...Appetites,  by Bourdain.

 

 I wish I had it 30 years ago. Basics are well taught by example (as opposed to explicitly) and strategy of cooking is discussed.  Many good recipes too. His day-by-day Thanksgiving planning is helpful, mine eventually evolved to be similar to his (with the exception of a stunt turkey). This would be a great gift for a new cook.

 

Kind of bittersweet. I doubt another author will ever address his reader as "fucknut" 

 

 

Edited by gfweb (log)
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32 minutes ago, gfweb said:

Not a 2021 book. But it's new to me and it is 2021...Appetites,  by Bourdain.

 

 I wish I had it 30 years ago. Basics are well taught by example (as opposed to explicitly) and strategy of cooking is discussed.  Many good recipes too. His day-by-day Thanksgiving planning is helpful, mine eventually evolved to be similar to his (with the exception of a stunt turkey). This would be a great gift for a new cook.

 

Kind of bittersweet. I doubt another author will ever address his reader as "fucknut" 

 

 

I like that one, too.  If I remember correctly, this book also contains his recommendation to use the NYT Sunday Style section as a clean and hygienic surface for draining bacon as one can be assured no one has ever touched it. 

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I  find myself referring to 'Let's eat France' quite a bit. Really well done.

 

edited to say that it's formatted like a website (imo) and I find myself flipping through it like it's hyperlinked lol. Some may find it distracting but it makes an odd sort of sense. Props to the team behind this book because it could have been awful if done poorly. 

Edited by AAQuesada (log)
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This is the current state of my "recently purchased" cookbook shelf:

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Some are new releases, others older editions but new to me. I like to keep them here until I've gotten to know them fairly well either through cooking or lots of reading. 

The book between Black Food and Zoe's Ghana Kitchen is Mumbai Modern.

A 2022 resolution is to limit new purchases until I've cleared this shelf and these books are all filed by subject. 

I reserve the right to make exceptions 🙃 

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I always get cookbooks for Christmas.  Sometimes good, sometimes not.  I always smile and say thank you, no mater what.  But...

 

My brother gave me some puzzling ones this year.  As seen here:

 

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I sort of get his reasoning.  We eat a lot of bowl food and noodles, but the ramen book is so bizarre.  Recipes routinely call for one full cup of wasabi, or a full cup of sriracha, among other problems.  I do not think anyone edited this book.  He definitely did not look inside before buying it haha.

 

The second book...I guess he was thinking about the fact that we occasionally went to Disney pre-Covid.  But every recipe in the book is for some kind of theme park snack.  There is no actual savory food.  It's all junky sugary stuff that no one in my house eats, even when we are actually at Disney!  

 

I'll be donating both to the library book sale.  Someone with a sweet tooth might actually like the Disney one.  

 

I did get something nice from him though: he gave my husband two t-shirts that were the 'exact' t-shirts that my sister gave my husband last year.  (Covid meant that we did not gather for Christmas last year, so he had no way of knowing) They are super soft and comfortable, so after we got home I snagged them for me to use as pajamas.  😀

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1 minute ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Sorry I asked.  A copy is now on its way to me.  Not like I don't have a pile of cookbooks I haven't read.

 

Similarly afflicted. 😬

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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On 12/22/2021 at 2:57 PM, paul o' vendange said:

Let's Eat France!: 1,250 specialty foods, 375 iconic recipes, 350 topics, 260 personalities, plus hundreds of maps, charts, tricks, tips, and ... you want to know about the food of France," by François-Régis Gaudry.  Looks goofy, pretty exhaustive, and a lot of fun.

 

I received this as a gift, it is fun!

 

Also, received Sicilia by Ben Tish. My niece gave it to several of us and we're all exciting about which recipes to try first. 

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5 hours ago, AAQuesada said:

Latest cook books:

The Olney is a treat.

 

The 'simple' is a piss-take. He is so bitchy and snobbish. A wonderful writer I read for pleasure. The few recipes I've done from that book have been good. It's dated but can classic ever really date?

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On 1/12/2022 at 11:16 AM, AAQuesada said:

Latest cook books: the Rancho book I'm re-getting after having given away my last copy. The book in Spanish is my mom's (and a recommendation from cousins in Puebla)

image.jpg

 

That Rancho book looks intriguing.  I read some reviews and now I want to know what a "California Tamale" or "Cup Tamale"

tastes like.

 

 

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The recipes in the Rancho book really work and seem to be well tested, stories are great based on her families oral history and from interviewing members of other Rancho families. Jacqueline Higuera McMahan always gives credit on recipes. There is a lot of Spanish influence, use of olive oil, olives, flour & flour tortillas, fig empanadas. 

 

I didn't see a 'Cup tamale' but don't expect anything super innovative but well done family recipes some quirky due to the history of the Californios. There's really not much else out there like this except maybe Encarnacion's Kitchen which is interesting more from a Historical perspective. 

 

Encarnacion's Kitchen: Mexican Recipes from Nineteenth-Century California, Selections from Encarnación Pinedo's El cocinero español (California Studies in Food and Culture) (Volume 9): Pinedo, Encarnación, Strehl, Dan: 9780520246768: Amazon.com: Books

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Trying not to get too off book topic, one of the reviews of the Rancho book mentioned "California Tamales".

<snip>

"Genuine Rancho Cooking. Receipt for early California Tamale is Included. It is not a Mexican Tamale, But the Genuine "California Tamale" Like the Kind Made in the Central Valley in the 30',40's 50's. And kind made at Warburtons (Out of Business), the Kind still made a Rosevelts Tamale parlor San Fransico. The California Tamale is Big Round when you break into it after un-tying the strings you break the Corn masa shell and Dip into the Chili Gravy with a Spoon."

 

This interested me and I looked up that style of tamale.  Turns out Norcal/SF had a lot of tamale parlours, which made a huge round tamale style.  And some made their tamales in coffee cups, steamed, without the use of a corn husk.  Very regional.  I went down a tamale rabbit hole with just that one review.

 

6 hours ago, AAQuesada said:

I didn't see a 'Cup tamale' but don't expect anything super innovative but well done family recipes some quirky due to the history of the Californios. There's really not much else out there like this except maybe Encarnacion's Kitchen which is interesting more from a Historical perspective. 

 

I may get a bag of harina and some ramekins and try that type for a lark.

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I  haven't made that one and I'm not old enough to remember tamales from that era! But the filing is based on a chile Colorado which I  did make this week and  i liked quite a bit for enchiladas.  The masa had a bit of olive oil in the dough in addition to the regular ingredients. 

 

I'll prolly make her flour tortillas with milk and butter next!

 

 

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On 1/12/2022 at 12:16 PM, AAQuesada said:

Latest cook books: the Rancho book I'm re-getting after having given away my last copy. The book in Spanish is my mom's (and a recommendation from cousins in Puebla)

image.jpg

 

Rancho on my cart - looks awesome.  Could you talk about Pueblo Y Su Cocina a bit?

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Puebla y su Cocina was published in 1971 and was likely put together in the late 60's by a  social / charitable organization. Recipes are all from local ladies in the higher social class many of whom had French trained Chefs -I know recipes in foreign languages doesn't hinder you here you will find stuff like Oysters Rockefeller and Oso buco to soufflé to hot cakes (Mexico does pancakes very well!). Really anything you would need to know food wise  if you were marrying into a  wealthy Mexican household. Including a section on nutrition, calories, weights measures and substitutions.

 

Yes there are all of the recipes you'd expect from Puebla as well like manchamanteles(so good you stain your tablecloth!) Tinga Poblana, mole  Poblano, Desserts as well that are local as well as French or Spanish. There is a great party guacamole with lots of chicharrón! 

 

I  posted a  cocktail from this book somewhere in that section not too long ago btw and no idea if it's available online. I'll mention again that the book was recommended by family in the city as having good recipes that are typical and work. 

image.jpg

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2 hours ago, AAQuesada said:

Puebla y su Cocina was published in 1971 and was likely put together in the late 60's by a  social / charitable organization. Recipes are all from local ladies in the higher social class many of whom had French trained Chefs -I know recipes in foreign languages doesn't hinder you here you will find stuff like Oysters Rockefeller and Oso buco to soufflé to hot cakes (Mexico does pancakes very well!). Really anything you would need to know food wise  if you were marrying into a  wealthy Mexican household. Including a section on nutrition, calories, weights measures and substitutions.

 

Yes there are all of the recipes you'd expect from Puebla as well like manchamanteles(so good you stain your tablecloth!) Tinga Poblana, mole  Poblano, Desserts as well that are local as well as French or Spanish. There is a great party guacamole with lots of chicharrón! 

 

I  posted a  cocktail from this book somewhere in that section not too long ago btw and no idea if it's available online. I'll mention again that the book was recommended by family in the city as having good recipes that are typical and work. 

image.jpg

 

Thanks.  Looking for Puebla y su Cocina, no luck so far but I love these kinds of books.

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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