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Troubleshooting Tempering


seawakim
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10 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

Thank you for that insight.  It's difficult to make yourself stop in the middle of making shells and test for temper, but it appears to be necessary.  Do you know of any discussion or any scientific papers about overtempering that deal with this problem?  I have also noticed that sometimes shells, when they are cooling in the fridge, acquire a dusty look.  Could this be a sign of overtempering?  They usually come out of the mold without a problem, but it looks suspicious.

Dusty inside is under tempered IMHO and they often contract beautifully and come out of the mold really easily because of all that contraction going from form IV to V. 

 

No sure about any papers. 

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On 4/20/2021 at 4:57 PM, Altay.Oro said:

 

Ok no lamp saying that the chocolate is now in perfectly tempered state and ready to use 🙂 we need to manually test the temper 👍

Do we need to adjust the temperature occasionally to prevent overtempering?

For example ... if I start the machine in the morning, can I use the tempered chocolate all along the day without any intervention?

 

 

the big automatic tempering machines like a Selmi hold the chocolate in the tank at 45C (or whatever you set it at). The chocolate that comes out the spout has been cooled to 32C (or whatever you set it to) and it's perfectly tempered (or should be). But once it's back in the big tank, it's back up to 45C and uncrystallised. So you can *get* tempered chocolate whenever you need it, but it's not held in temper all the time. 

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KeyChoc Infinity AX and BX automated tempering machines operate a little different.


The bowl / tank melting temperature setpoint (42C to 45C) is only when the machine is not in temper mode. When you initiate tempering it will lower the working bowl / tank temperature to about 3 degrees above the working setpoint temperature.


It will not try to decrystallize the working bowl / tank while in tempering mode. 


So, after while your chocolate will start to visibly thicken which is basically overseeding.

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  • 1 month later...
On 4/22/2021 at 10:29 PM, keychris said:

the big automatic tempering machines like a Selmi hold the chocolate in the tank at 45C (or whatever you set it at). The chocolate that comes out the spout has been cooled to 32C (or whatever you set it to) and it's perfectly tempered (or should be).

 

So since the Selmi cools before dispensing, in theory it could give me chocolate cooled to below room temp?  If it's 95F in my kitchen, it could dispense chocolate at 88?  I'd have to put it directly in the fridge, but hmmm ...

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34 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

So since the Selmi cools before dispensing, in theory it could give me chocolate cooled to below room temp?  If it's 95F in my kitchen, it could dispense chocolate at 88?  I'd have to put it directly in the fridge, but hmmm ...

It has a compressor in it to cool - so yes.

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On 6/7/2021 at 1:59 AM, Kerry Beal said:

I'd say 20 minutes or so. 

It takes me so much longer than this - I'm wondering if that's a part of my results being so hit and miss. What kind of bowl are you using and are you placing it on top of a bowl filled with ice to cool it down? I'm using glass and just sitting it onto a cloth.

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Find me here - it's a free 4 day pass where you can watch all the demos.  I demo tempering dark and milk on a slab, by seeding and of course with the EZtemper. I also do a demo on tempering Ruby by the same 3 methods. You'll be able to see the bowl I use.

 

I prefer plastic these days - glass really hangs on to the heat. 

 

I tend not to use cold water or ice under the bowl anymore. 

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22 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Find me here - it's a free 4 day pass where you can watch all the demos.  I demo tempering dark and milk on a slab, by seeding and of course with the EZtemper. I also do a demo on tempering Ruby by the same 3 methods. You'll be able to see the bowl I use.

 

I prefer plastic these days - glass really hangs on to the heat. 

 

I tend not to use cold water or ice under the bowl anymore. 

Brilliant, thank you for that 😁

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  • 2 months later...
On 4/13/2003 at 6:47 AM, mjc said:

The way I temper chocolate is to first melt it to somewhere between 115 and 120 degrees F. I've found this to be the most important step. If you bring the temperature of the chocolate to high you will not be able to achieve a good temper. Different chocolates have different maximum temperatures, so if you are having problems, this may be one area to investigate.

After you have melted the chocolate and brought it to the right temperature you then cool it down. You want to bring it down to around 80 degrees, but again this can vary slightly with the chocolate you are using. There are different methods you can use to cool, the chocolate. I use the Tabliering method and pour about 1/2 of the chocolate on a marble slab, where I spread it with a spatula to cool, and then add it back to the bowl. Then combine the cooled chocolate with the warmer chocolate in the bowl. You should now have achieved that approx 80 degree temp. But now of course the chocolate will be to think to work with, so you have to carefully rewarm it to around 90 (also varies slightly). To rewarm it, I usually just put it back over the water bath that I used originially to melt my chocolate, but have been off the heat for awhile. It is important at this stage I believe not to get the chocolate too hot.

I'm not a professional, but this is the method that works best for me. I usually achieve a very good temper. When I don't, I find that I have accidently warmed the chocolate too much.

Hope this helps.

What happens if the chcoclate u were tableing makes the chcoclate in the bowl too cold when you add it back in?

Also another question Im assuming if you add it back and its too warm still you just pour some oout again till it reaches tempetature,am I correct in that at do you think/thanks

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1 hour ago, Siobhan said:

What happens if the chcoclate u were tableing makes the chcoclate in the bowl too cold when you add it back in?

Also another question Im assuming if you add it back and its too warm still you just pour some oout again till it reaches tempetature,am I correct in that at do you think/thanks

Heat it with a microwave or hairdryer back to the working temperature.  If too warm - yes - pour some out, work it again and add it back in.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi:  I temper chocolate with homemade "silk".  I've found I have to rapidly cool the chocolate to prevent blooming as well as loss of temper, i.e. put it in the fridge for 30-60 minutes.  I'm using the fancy pricey GP-610 tomric molds, filling each bar with ~50g dark chocolate.

 

Blooming always occurs if I let it set slowly at room temp, which ranges 60-75F.  Does this sound right, or am I potentially doing something wrong?

 

I'm asking this question to help me troubleshoot another issue (which I'll bring up later if needed, trying to figure things out on my own ;))

 

PS: fwiw, this is a hobby, I make a few bars every couple months for fun to taste varieties of cacao I roast.  Not a commercial operation.

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