Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

How to coat gummies? Wax, Oil, etc.


Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

Im trying to experiment a bit with custom gummies and candies. The Gummy recipe I have seems good but like most store bought, it needs a coating, Im trying to find information but its super hard to come by, do you guys have any idea how to coat them? For example if I want wax coated gummies HOW should I use the Carnauba or Beeswax? And is there a type of Carnauba other than flakes? For the oil coated what oil is used? For example some Haribos seem to be oil coated but what oil? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome @JordanB

 

5% carnauba wax is mixed with a neutral oil like grapeseed or sunflower. I think you'll find instruction on how to emulsify here.

 

Then spin them in a coating pan and put a small amount of oil mixture on them. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

What would your batch size be? Is this just for personal consumption, or something much larger? Also, are you molding in starch, or silicone molds? I do around 2.5kg batches. Just my opinion, I wouldn't mess with wax on gummies, I think It'll end up being more problematic then its worth if this is just something your messing around with yourself. However if your producing much larger batches for packaging, the wax coating will benefit the product. In Chocolates and Confections, Greweling lists vegetable oil for coating. The oils @Kerry Beal mentioned are ideal, they leave no flavor, and keep in mind, you dont need much oil to coat the gummies, a little goes a very long way.

 

Just for reference, heres what the book Confectionery Science and Technology says: "Most gummy, licorice and some jelly candies are coated with a layer of wax to provide a shiny appearance and to prevent pieces from sticking in the package. For example, gummy bears are typically coated with a thin layer of wax dissolved in oil to provide a shiny appearance. Fractionated fats, oils or waxes are applied to the surface of the candy as they tumble in a pan. Fats and oils used include mineral oil and fractionated coconut oil, among others. Beeswax and carnauba wax are commonly used waxes. Once the oiling layer has solidified, the candies are ready for packaging."

 

I just depends on what scale your making your gummies on. I used to coat with oil, but I started to favor tossing in sugar for the texture contrast.

 

Also, here is what Haribo lists (in the US) on the ingredients label for their gummies: GLUCOSE SYRUP (FROM WHEAT OR CORN), SUGAR, GELATIN, DEXTROSE (FROM WHEAT OR CORN), CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF: CITRIC ACID, ARTIFICIAL AND NATURAL FLAVORS, PALM OIL, PALM KERNEL OIL, CARNAUBA WAX, WHITE BEESWAX, YELLOW BEESWAX, YELLOW 5, RED 40, BLUE 1.

 

So there are two different oils listed, I'm sure there is a good reason for that, but they are both from palm.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, minas6907 said:

What would your batch size be? Is this just for personal consumption, or something much larger? Also, are you molding in starch, or silicone molds? I do around 2.5kg batches. Just my opinion, I wouldn't mess with wax on gummies, I think It'll end up being more problematic then its worth if this is just something your messing around with yourself. However if your producing much larger batches for packaging, the wax coating will benefit the product. In Chocolates and Confections, Greweling lists vegetable oil for coating. The oils @Kerry Beal mentioned are ideal, they leave no flavor, and keep in mind, you dont need much oil to coat the gummies, a little goes a very long way.

 

Just for reference, heres what the book Confectionery Science and Technology says: "Most gummy, licorice and some jelly candies are coated with a layer of wax to provide a shiny appearance and to prevent pieces from sticking in the package. For example, gummy bears are typically coated with a thin layer of wax dissolved in oil to provide a shiny appearance. Fractionated fats, oils or waxes are applied to the surface of the candy as they tumble in a pan. Fats and oils used include mineral oil and fractionated coconut oil, among others. Beeswax and carnauba wax are commonly used waxes. Once the oiling layer has solidified, the candies are ready for packaging."

 

I just depends on what scale your making your gummies on. I used to coat with oil, but I started to favor tossing in sugar for the texture contrast.

 

Also, here is what Haribo lists (in the US) on the ingredients label for their gummies: GLUCOSE SYRUP (FROM WHEAT OR CORN), SUGAR, GELATIN, DEXTROSE (FROM WHEAT OR CORN), CONTAINS LESS THAN 2% OF: CITRIC ACID, ARTIFICIAL AND NATURAL FLAVORS, PALM OIL, PALM KERNEL OIL, CARNAUBA WAX, WHITE BEESWAX, YELLOW BEESWAX, YELLOW 5, RED 40, BLUE 1.

 

So there are two different oils listed, I'm sure there is a good reason for that, but they are both from palm.

 

Oh I see, thats really great thank you. You see I do plan to do quantities similar to you, more or less a few kilograms. it does matter slightly as I plan to sell them to a few local delis who are interested. The wax coating isnt something im fixated on if theres a better option Im open to one. Did you not find that coating them in sugar caused them to melt? Bear in mind I am looking for them to last as long as possible preferably more than a few months, not sure if the coating would help that

I will be using silicon moulds as it is what I have available however if it works I might consider starch moulds, are they much better for larger quantities of a few kilos?

Edited by JordanB (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I'd use grams rather than ml's myself. So 0.5 g of flakes in 9.5 g of oil. It's probably going to work out close to 9.5 ml but oil and water weigh a bit different,

Oh I see, thank you

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, JordanB said:

Oh I see, thats really great thank you. You see I do plan to do quantities similar to you, more or less a few kilograms. it does matter slightly as I plan to sell them to a few local delis who are interested. The wax coating isnt something im fixated on if theres a better option Im open to one. Did you not find that coating them in sugar caused them to melt? Bear in mind I am looking for them to last as long as possible preferably more than a few months, not sure if the coating would help that

I will be using silicon moulds as it is what I have available however if it works I might consider starch moulds, are they much better for larger quantities of a few kilos?

I'd say for the quantity that your doing, just stick with the oil, but I don't want to discourage you from trying the waxing process. When the gummies get coated in granulated sugar, they wont melt. Have you had that experience?

 

I think starch molding is great for very large quantities, I used to do it myself, but just got tired of the mess. I use silicone molds now, they take a little more time having to unmold each piece, but they give a clean shape and just more convenient then a starch tray. I have found that after depositing the gummies, I'll leave them in the mold on covered sheet pans for about 1 week, they seem to dry out pretty well during that time, giving you a gummy that won't sweat during storage. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, minas6907 said:

I'd say for the quantity that your doing, just stick with the oil, but I don't want to discourage you from trying the waxing process. When the gummies get coated in granulated sugar, they wont melt. Have you had that experience?

 

I think starch molding is great for very large quantities, I used to do it myself, but just got tired of the mess. I use silicone molds now, they take a little more time having to unmold each piece, but they give a clean shape and just more convenient then a starch tray. I have found that after depositing the gummies, I'll leave them in the mold on covered sheet pans for about 1 week, they seem to dry out pretty well during that time, giving you a gummy that won't sweat during storage. 

Oh okay I see, so if I am using silicone molds, do you recommend leaving them for like 12-24hrs in the mold then taking them out and putting them on a rack to dry for a week or rather leave them in the mold for a week? Also what do you place in the mold before putting the Gummy liquid, starch or oil?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, JordanB said:

Oh okay I see, so if I am using silicone molds, do you recommend leaving them for like 12-24hrs in the mold then taking them out and putting them on a rack to dry for a week or rather leave them in the mold for a week? Also what do you place in the mold before putting the Gummy liquid, starch or oil?

I used to remove the gummies the next day and put on a rack to dry, but just sort of got into a habit of leaving them in the molds, it's just something I started to do. I think either way you'll be fine, but that extra drying time really benefits the gummies. 

 

I don't out anything in the mold, no oil or starch, I just deposit the gummy right in.

 

Do you mind if I ask how many batches you've made so far?

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, minas6907 said:

I used to remove the gummies the next day and put on a rack to dry, but just sort of got into a habit of leaving them in the molds, it's just something I started to do. I think either way you'll be fine, but that extra drying time really benefits the gummies. 

 

I don't out anything in the mold, no oil or starch, I just deposit the gummy right in.

 

Do you mind if I ask how many batches you've made so far?

I havent made any batches of Gellatin ones, I was trying to make Vegan Friendly ones using Agar Agar, honey, etc. but I found them to be too Jelly like and crumby

Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, JordanB said:

I havent made any batches of Gellatin ones, I was trying to make Vegan Friendly ones using Agar Agar, honey, etc. but I found them to be too Jelly like and crumby

Agar gels tend to be crumbly - but if you add a little bit of xanthan gum, it helps the texture.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JordanB said:

I havent made any batches of Gellatin ones, I was trying to make Vegan Friendly ones using Agar Agar, honey, etc. but I found them to be too Jelly like and crumby

Oh ok that makes more sense. I'm sorry for not asking specifically before, but I think the comparison to Haribo just made me assume you were making gelatin gummies. In that case I wouldnt do anything with wax, I would coat the exterior with sugar. I also understand now when you asked about the sugar melting on the exterior. Agar sets up very easily, its fool proof, but its also easy to have too much liquid in there and not realize it until its too late, since the whole mixture is quite fluid. If you want a vegan product, look also into pectin jellies or pate de fruit. Just a side note, you mentioned vegan friendly jellies, honey isnt vegan friendly.

Edited by minas6907
Grammer (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, minas6907 said:

Oh ok that makes more sense. I'm sorry for not asking specifically before, but I think the comparison to Haribo just made me assume you were making gelatin gummies. In that case I wouldnt do anything with wax, I would coat the exterior with sugar. I also understand now when you asked about the sugar melting on the exterior. Agar sets up very easily, its fool proof, but its also easy to have too much liquid in there and not realize it until its too late, since the whole mixture is quite fluid. If you want a vegan product, look also into pectin jellies or pate de fruit. Just a side note, you mentioned vegan friendly jellies, honey isnt vegan friendly.

Sorry, I am now doing Gelatin as I dont like the Agar Agar its not worth the hassle :) I may do Agar Agar as a separate one if theres demand eventually.
Also I will take a look at those other gummies thank you :)

Edited by JordanB (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

gelatin are always the best, ime, as frustrating as it might be for people wanting to do vegan options.

 

if you were doing vegan ones, i'd look at using carrageenan, specifically iota carrageenan, as well. as i understand it produces a relatively elastic gel, dependent on the concentration of calcium ions present. you could play around with those and any other gels/gums to check for synergy.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...