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Hi all!! 

I work at an amazing little New Zealand Style ice cream shop in the beautiful Denver Colorado. I was hoping to get a little help on the subject of adding fruit into ice cream after extracting it and ensuring that, when the ice cream is frozen, the fruity bits don't turn into rock hard shards. I am planning on doing a cherry chocolate ice cream and I was going to soak some dried cherries that we're no longer using for something else. I was planning on using some brandy and a ton of sugar, but I was really hoping someone had a tried and true method they could send my way so that I KNOW that the fruit will be luscious as it's frozen. If you have a certain sugar ratio. I know there is the brix test, but to be honest it's been many years since pastry school and I am very rusty. Would love to hear from some of my fellow sugar-heads. 

Thank you!

Amy

 

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Are they sweetened dried sour cherries?  Dried fruit has very little water and wouldn't get icy, and any sugar in the fruit is already concentrated.  I think the brandy soak should suffice without additional sugar.

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Posted (edited)

Or would adding the water to rehydrate them a little (2 c cherries 1 c water) the reason that they would become rock hard in the ice cream? because of the additional water content? @pastrygirl

Edited by amyneill (log)
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yeah you don't want to dilute the sugar too much, I don't remember how fully cherries re-hydrate but I'm sure I've done something similar

 

maybe 2 c dried (sweetened) sour cherries, 1/2 c (1:1) simple syrup, 1/4 c brandy?  You don't want a ton of extra liquid, that would be a waste of brandy ;)

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Forgive me, I'm just a visitor to this topic:  last cherry season I dehydrated a bunch of cherries* and if I were putting them in ice cream I would add them dried.  Maybe chopped up a bit.

 

 

*a bunch of cherries dehydrated is not that much.

 

 

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17 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

yeah you don't want to dilute the sugar too much, I don't remember how fully cherries re-hydrate but I'm sure I've done something similar

 

maybe 2 c dried (sweetened) sour cherries, 1/2 c (1:1) simple syrup, 1/4 c brandy?  You don't want a ton of extra liquid, that would be a waste of brandy ;)

 

on the plus side if you have leftover brandy afterwards it makes for a bomb cocktail add

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