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Yorkshire pudding. It’s what’s for dessert!


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As someone raised to know that Yorkshire pudding makes a great dessert, I couldn’t help but share this when I came across it today. 
 

Click.

 

@jayrayner’s paen to Nigella Lawson’s How to Eat (1998).

 

“It is hard to describe this dessert as a recipe, although, of course, the yorkshire pudding demands one. It’s more of an idea and a bloody good one at that: normally you eat yorkshire puddings that way but you could, you know, try it this way.”

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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I've always been of the opinion a Dutch baby is pretty much the same thing as a Yorkshire pudding, and I love 'em both sweet and savory. Though I think my favorite bridges the gap between the two, with pears, blue cheese and crumbled bacon.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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Seems to me the difference between Yorkshire pudding and dessert is your taste for beef tallow. I'm not convinced I want that for dessert. If there were leftover YP from dinner, though, I'd be very happy to have that for breakfast the next day.

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51 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

Seems to me the difference between Yorkshire pudding and dessert is your taste for beef tallow. I'm not convinced I want that for dessert. If there were leftover YP from dinner, though, I'd be very happy to have that for breakfast the next day.

 

Mincemeat pie?

 

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9 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Mincemeat pie?

 

Well, that's fair. I've never had it. I grew up with parents who really had limited cooking abilities. My mother grew up Kosher, my dad? Hard to know what he did before he became my dad. We ate a lot of local Chinese and local deli food. Then I moved to Wisconsin for a year and lived on soup mix and  A and W burgers and root beer. Then I moved to New Mexico and survived happily on great  cheap family restaurant food: bowls of red and green chile, beans, enchiladas. In those days we wouldn't be caught dead at Taco Bell. Then I moved to CA, lived on the border of SF Chinatown and discovered some basic wok cooking, mine and others. Then I married a native CA boy with a mainly vegetarian family that lived on veg lasagne,strange tofu casseroles and big salads that were also strange. Except for my husband, who ate everything and still does, even as I've become finicky. So, mincemeat pie? What exactly is it?

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

A spicy dried fruit dessert pie that traditionally contains beef suet.  But usually does not.

 

Thanks for a very cogent answer. Sounds positively medieval. Are there raisins in it? If so I would be unlikely to even taste it!

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3 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

A spicy dried fruit dessert pie that traditionally contains beef suet.  But usually does not

 

Mincemeat pies, more commonly just 'mince pies' in the UK, traditionally contained minced meat and suet in the filling (as well as suet in the pastry).

The pies are still an essential part of Christmas in the UK and the best still contain suet, but no longer contain meat.

 

Here is a recipe from Saveur using suet. But no meat in the filling.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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2 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

Thanks for a very cogent answer. Sounds positively medieval. Are there raisins in it? If so I would be unlikely to even taste it!

 

Enough brandy and you'd never notice.

 

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4 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

Mincemeat pies, more commonly just 'mince pies' in the UK, traditionally contained minced meat and suet in the filling (as well as suet in the pastry).

The pies are still an essential part of Christmas in the UK and the best still contain suet, but no longer contain meat.

 

Here is a recipe from Saveur using suet. But no meat in the filling.

Okay, that recipe. The good news: there is only 1/4 cup of raisins, so they could easily be eliminated and the currants increased. The very bad news: the recipe calls for 2 cups of suet...AND THAT'S JUST IN THE FILLING! Clearly the brandy needs an upward adjustment. London at xmas does have its charms, so I will reconsider.

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14 hours ago, liuzhou said:

The pies are still an essential part of Christmas in the UK

Yup. I really miss mince tarts as we called them. My sister makes dozens every Christmas for her family and friends. Unfortunately I don’t think they would travel well or arrive in time for Christmas. 
 

CCAA1492-4446-46DD-A627-73F35B5BBDC6.thumb.jpeg.c030f0726af013248e8b4f31d7988ced.jpeg

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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23 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Yup. I really miss mince tarts as we called them. My sister makes dozens every Christmas for her family and friends. Unfortunately I don’t think they would travel well or arrive in time for Christmas.

 

 

Yeah. My mother tried sending me mince pies/tarts some years back. I got a pile of crumbs and dried fruit. Still ate it!

She switched to sending Christmas pudding, but that's a whole different story. They turn up every Christmas in good shape though.

 

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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17 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Enough brandy and you'd never notice.

 

In the pie or the partaker of the pie?

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Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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On 4/5/2021 at 6:51 PM, Katie Meadow said:

Thanks for a very cogent answer. Sounds positively medieval. Are there raisins in it? If so I would be unlikely to even taste it!

Open a new window; open a new door.

Travel a new highway

that's never been tried before...

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eGullet member #80.

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