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Flan tin


Susanwusan
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10 hours ago, Susanwusan said:

I'm looking for a flan tin that has a loose bottom and straight sides and with a decent depth indent.  Why is it so hard to find one??

Sounds like you might mean a springform pan?

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

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Not springform, but loose-bottomed so that you can push it out, and the dip is deep enough to hold a nice amount of fruit and the like.  Fluted ones are readily available but I don't like to spend time cleaning each individual "flute" and wanted one with plain side.  I've had to get a fluted one that I'll try out before getting a second one.

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2 hours ago, Susanwusan said:

Not springform, but loose-bottomed so that you can push it out, and the dip is deep enough to hold a nice amount of fruit and the like.  Fluted ones are readily available but I don't like to spend time cleaning each individual "flute" and wanted one with plain side.  I've had to get a fluted one that I'll try out before getting a second one.

 

Not springform. They may have the rings you are looking for here, and maybe you can simply use the bottom part of one of your fluted tart pans...

 

https://www.nycake.com/products-search?qs=tart

Edited by weinoo (log)

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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5 hours ago, Susanwusan said:

Not springform, but loose-bottomed so that you can push it out, and the dip is deep enough to hold a nice amount of fruit and the like.  Fluted ones are readily available but I don't like to spend time cleaning each individual "flute" and wanted one with plain side.  I've had to get a fluted one that I'll try out before getting a second one.

Obviously a misunderstanding of “straight sides”. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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8 hours ago, Susanwusan said:

Not springform, but loose-bottomed so that you can push it out, and the dip is deep enough to hold a nice amount of fruit and the like.

 

The combination of loose bottom and a deep indent seems like a recipe for leakage.

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methinks some confusion maybe coming from "flan"

 

there's the custard type flan desert

and

there's the (single) layer cake with perimeter ridges "fruit tart" type thing.

 

same name, seriously different dishes.....

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3 minutes ago, AlaMoi said:

methinks some confusion maybe coming from "flan"

 

there's the custard type flan desert

and

there's the (single) layer cake with perimeter ridges "fruit tart" type thing.

 

same name, seriously different dishes.....

Indeed!  But re-reading the OP‘s posts I think we’re talking the fruit kind. I’m still puzzling over the straight sides. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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'the fruit kind' - yup.  the "deep indent" pointed me in that direction

 

I have a fixed bottom aka "one piece" pan - which has the scalloped sides. 

it's a non-stick; cleaning the scallops isn't a serious problem here - but I only use it now&then.

 

the straight side thing is also not unusual, at least in my experience. 

a quick visit to your local Konditorei will demonstrate a raft of edge / side treatments - straight, fluted, tapered, shells . . . .

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This has turned into an interesting thread to me for linguistic reasons.  (the old joke of separated by a common language)

 

flan ≠ flan,  in Europe I have gathered.

Flan in UK must mean a thin sponge cake layered with fruit and custard toppings.  Using a tart or quiche removable bottom pan. (OP doesn't want a springform version).

 

Flan across the Channel, in the US and Latin America is a baked custard with caramel topping that is made to be inverted at serving.  Lots of special pans for this flan prep.

 

So a flan in UK would require a tart pan, quiche pan, cake pan or "sandwich tin"(??) with removable bottom (NOT springform I guess)(I've been searching the Amazon UK site with glee).

 

In the US, the pan the OP might look at would be a cheesecake pan.  I have always made cheesecake in springform, so I wasn't aware there were "cheesecake pans".

Amazon US has this version (eG-friendly Amazon.com link) which looks like a plain sided, deeper, removable bottom cheesecake/cake/flan/quiche/tart/etc (whatever the heck you want to call it) pan.

 

I guess the trick is knowing the terms to search for?  Maybe?  This is a cheesecake pan on Amazon UK (eG-friendly Amazon.com link), but I still don't know if it is what OP is looking for .

 

Edited by lemniscate (log)
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if you search on "German flan" - you'll see kabillions of flat cakes with raised edges.

if you google "custard flan" - you'll see kabillions of custard lumps.

 

you may find blogger who insists on terms like 'desert flan' - and you'll find another blogger using the same term but for 'the other dish'

 

every expert has a different definition.

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