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New York Times taken to task for Instagram about Nanaimo bars.


Anna N
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24 minutes ago, FauxPas said:

I do like Nanaimo bars, but a little bit goes a long way. I made them two or three times a year when we were living in the US, though. It was a fun thing to bring to dinners and gatherings and I was surprised how many people raved about them and asked for the recipe. I'd joke and say, nope it's a national secret, before I would share. I know, I'm pretty lame! 😄

I was just listening to the CBC and apparently one of the things that made it difficult to get them correct south of the border was the lack of a source of Birdseye custard powder. 
 

Here is some more interesting background on Nanaimo bars. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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15 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I was just listening to the CBC and apparently one of the things that made it difficult to get them correct south of the border was the lack of a source of Birdseye custard powder. 

 

Amazon was my friend. They always seemed to have some, though maybe a bit pricey. But I didn't care, it lasted such a long time. And I shared. 🙂

 

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lol people who get upset about stuff like this have blessed lives. i like nanaimo bars but i think the nyt ratio probably results in something you can eat a little more of; they're so sweet otherwise, and given the way the chocolate layer is made, not something you can easily pick up without getting sticky fingers. oh well, i don't think if people saw those in person they'd comment, to be entirely honest

 

On 3/4/2021 at 1:27 PM, chromedome said:

Standard doner kebab/gyro format, with meat sliced from the vertical rotisserie and browned briefly on the flat-top. The usual additions are chopped tomatoes and onion, and - this is hte distinctive part - a sweet, milky sauce. It sounds bizarre, but the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

https://www.foodnetwork.ca/shows/great-canadian-cookbook/blog/the-delicious-history-of-the-halifax-donair/

 

the sauce that all the maritimers make for them is as follows:

 

dump a can of sweetened condensed milk into a bowl

cover the top with garlic powder

dump in around a quarter cup of white vinegar

stir

 

after chilling the vinegar has denatured the milk proteins and turns the sticky goo into something thick and spreadable with the approximate consistency of mayo

 

21 hours ago, Anna N said:

I was just listening to the CBC and apparently one of the things that made it difficult to get them correct south of the border was the lack of a source of Birdseye custard powder. 
 

Here is some more interesting background on Nanaimo bars. 

 

we have a can in the cupboard exclusively for nanaimo bars because my SO insisted. afaict from the label it's just cornstarch, fake vanilla, and yellow, though, so i'm skeptical as to how important it really is, lol.

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11 minutes ago, jimb0 said:

 

 

 

we have a can in the cupboard exclusively for nanaimo bars because my SO insisted. afaict from the label it's just cornstarch, fake vanilla, and yellow, though, so i'm skeptical as to how important it really is, lol.

I prefer Harry Hornes Custard Pudding powder myself - but often have to settle for Birds. I would argue that the custard powder is critically important - you could never get that flavor or colour with a real custard. 

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16 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I prefer Harry Hornes Custard Pudding powder myself - but often have to settle for Birds. I would argue that the custard powder is critically important - you could never get that flavor or colour with a real custard. 

 

oh i'm not so much suggesting making a real custard as i am making your own custard powder!

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