Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Need Tips for Induction Cooktop Usage and Care


Janet Taylor
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone!

One of the appliances in our remodeled kitchen is an induction cooktop. I'd like to hear some tips on usage and care. We live in an area where it's electricity only, unless you get a tank put in (rather costly). It's mighty hard soil, more like rock, in the Austin/Lakeway area. We've had electric ceramic/glass cooktop and gas before. I was told induction is as close to gas as you can get.


1) What cleaning products do you recommend? Do you use anything differently for light or heavy cleaning?

I purchased Weiman's cooktop cloth cleaners. They worked just fine but they are just very wet and I have to use a microfiber cloth to wipe off excess. I LOVE Weiman's stainless steel cleaner wipes and I don't seem to have to wipe off the excess.


2) Any razor blade type scrapper in particular that you use?


3) Are there products that you've purchased or use to put under your pots/pans when cooking?

I have tried newspaper and it seems to work just fine. It's easy to clean up after cooking. Just looks a little goofy when your cooking. I tried parchment paper once and that seemed to scorch a bit, so that's a no go.


4) I read that milk and some other foods need to be cleaned up immediately. But, not while the element is hot. What do you do in that case?


ANY tips and suggestions are greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you've had any other cooktop with a ceramic surface, care is exactly the same. Stuff like milk that sticks on hard is less of an issue than with conventional cooktops, because your surface never gets as hot (it just absorbs some heat from the pan) which in turn means it cools more quickly, and the spill simply dries on rather than cooking/burning on.

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the Forum!

 

You will get many tips.

 

Here is mine:

 

Get a sheet of cheap silicone bake mat, cut to size and put on top of the cooking area and cook right on top of it. You will need a lot less cleaning of your cooker.

 

dcarch

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, dcarch said:

Welcome to the Forum!

 

You will get many tips.

 

Here is mine:

 

Get a sheet of cheap silicone bake mat, cut to size and put on top of the cooking area and cook right on top of it. You will need a lot less cleaning of your cooker.

 

dcarch

I like this idea but I wonder how it will impact cooking - like shaking a pan, sauteing etc... those silicone mats are pretty grippy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have an induction range and have never had any cause to use a razor blade or anything more than a soapy cloth to clean it. On the other hand, in the past, I spent many minutes trying to clean my daughter’s glass top electric range. I have had my range for more than five years. 

Edited by Anna N
To add additional info and correct the typo (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I have an induction range and have never had any cause to use a razor blade or anything more than a soapy cloth to clean it. On the other hand, in the past, I spent many minutes trying to clean my daughter’s glass top electric range. I have had my range for more than five years. 

My experience is the same.  I once had a glass top electric range and hated it.  Stuff baked on and was hard to clean.  My induction top is a snap to clean.  Just soap and water.  I the six years I have had it, I have never needed to "scrape" anything.  If I do get a spot that is a bit stubborn, Bar Keepers Friend takes care of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, KennethT said:

I like this idea but I wonder how it will impact cooking - like shaking a pan, sauteing etc... those silicone mats are pretty grippy

 

I should have said that you can get a type of silicon mats which are not grippy. I think they are called oven liners. They are kind of thin and slippery.

 

dcarch

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I'm wondering why you would want to put anything under your pots when cooking unless it's to collect splatter.

 

Splatter and boil over happen in my kitchen everyday.

I multi-task.

I set the cooktop at high power, then run to the workshop to work on a project, ------ and the phone rings ----- and a friend rings the doorbell. Not only that I need to prevent splatter, I also have a cover taped permanently to the smoke detector :D!

 

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm wondering if the non-grippy silicon mat would allow me to shake the pan around my induction stovetop without fear of scratching it? Maybe not a cast iron pan, but a small skillet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a glass top induction burner and a glass top electric range. I shake my pans all the time and have never scratched either and have been using both for half a decade. I can't imagine putting anything underneath my cookware to try to spare the cooktop or allegedly make cleaning easier. 
 

 

Update: Okay, so I looked at my cooktop closely and there are some fine scratches on the most used burners. They’re not immediately visible unless you’re really looking for them, and I’d consider them to be part of normal wear and tear, especially given how much the cooktop has been used (and how much shakin’ has been goin’ on).

Edited by btbyrd (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

Splatter and boil over happen in my kitchen everyday.

I multi-task.

I set the cooktop at high power, then run to the workshop to work on a project, ------ and the phone rings ----- and a friend rings the doorbell. Not only that I need to prevent splatter, I also have a cover taped permanently to the smoke detector :D!

 

dcarch

Sounds like a recipe for disaster. 

  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, FeChef said:

I am planning on buying a Induction range, Not sure why anyone would just want a cooktop.

This Frigidaire Induction Air Fryer Range is what i am planning to buy when i remodel my kitchen next month.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/FRIGIDAIRE-GALLERY-30-in-5-4-cu-ft-Front-Control-Induction-Range-with-Air-Fry-in-Stainless-Steel-FGIH3047VF/311224897

 

not everyone wants to bend down to an oven? some people already have cooktops and want or need to replace them without remodelling their entire kitchen? some people just want to add a portable cooking spot? there are lots of good reasons. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, FeChef said:

I am planning on buying a Induction range, Not sure why anyone would just want a cooktop.

This Frigidaire Induction Air Fryer Range is what i am planning to buy when i remodel my kitchen next month.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/FRIGIDAIRE-GALLERY-30-in-5-4-cu-ft-Front-Control-Induction-Range-with-Air-Fry-in-Stainless-Steel-FGIH3047VF/311224897

Personally, in a kitchen with very little real estate, I like the flexibility of being able to do something else in that space if needed if I'm not using the cooktops.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

to reiterate i find the cafe line to be attractive but for me personally, overpriced. 

 

induction is so good. i can’t imagine wanting to go back to gas. 

Edited by jimb0 (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, jimb0 said:

 

induction is so good. i can’t imagine wanting to go back to gas. 

In about a month, I'm moving and will be transitioning from gas to induction (the apt building has no gas service). What pans do you use that give you the performance you like? I can't use most of my current pans (15 year old All Clad LTD).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, KennethT said:

In about a month, I'm moving and will be transitioning from gas to induction (the apt building has no gas service). What pans do you use that give you the performance you like? I can't use most of my current pans (15 year old All Clad LTD).

i’m the worst person to ask because i’m a cheapskate about that sort of thing. i tend to trawl the aisles of the local discount store like tj maxx / winners, but whatever looks like it’s quality, and run it into the ground then buy new ones a few years later. 

 

i would just beware any pans that are induction capable but only have a thin sheath of a magnetic or paramagnetic material as performance will likely be spotty and lacklustre. otherwise you can probably feel out what cookware will end up being a good buy. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not an expert, but in my experience the magnet test works well. Take along a decent magnet when you shop, and try it on pots and pans. The stronger the grip (tested in several spots along the cooking surface) the better it'll likely work.

 

I've been using Canadian-made Paderno pots and pans purchased at a deep discount, which work well for me. Sadly, that information does you little good in New York.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, lindag said:

I bought this induction range a few months ago for my brand new home...not only is it beautiful but it is a dream to cook with.

 

Café™ 30" Smart Slide-In, Front-Control, Induction and Convection Range with Warming Drawer - CHS900P4MW2 - Cafe Appliances

 

 

Too rich for my blood, but that is very nice looking. I will habve to settle for a range under $2000

Link to comment
Share on other sites

also too rich but i lust after: those in-surface induction cook surfaces. they just look like a countertop when you're not actively cooking.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/27/2021 at 2:41 AM, FeChef said:

I am planning on buying a Induction range, Not sure why anyone would just want a cooktop.

 

Unless I'm mistaken (which sometimes happens) an Induction Range is just an induction cooktop with the addition of a standard electric (convection?) oven in one cabinet. Corners have to be cut somewhere. The advantage of purchasing a separate cooktop and oven is the option of location in the kitchen, you're not restricted to having both in the same physical space (a wall oven or even an Anova Precision Oven come to mind).

 

My take on ranges in general.

 

p

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, jimb0 said:

 

not everyone wants to bend down to an oven? some people already have cooktops and want or need to replace them without remodelling their entire kitchen? some people just want to add a portable cooking spot? there are lots of good reasons. 

Long before induction arrived on the domestic market I had a kitchen with an electric coil cooktop and a countertop Braun convection oven. For some people giving up all that real estate to accommodate a huge box makes no sense. It might earn its keep twice a year — at Christmas and Thanksgiving.  
 

It’s a matter of the best use of kitchen real estate for each individual cook.

 

Some of us have confessed that the standard oven beneath a cooktop is a storage spot for little used pots and pans! A purpose-built unit makes more sense. 

  • Like 4

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Anna N said:

Long before induction arrived on the domestic market I had a kitchen with an electric coil cooktop and a countertop Braun convection oven. For some people giving up all that real estate to accommodate a huge box makes no sense. It might earn its keep twice a year — at Christmas and Thanksgiving.  
 

It’s a matter of the best use of kitchen real estate for each individual cook.

 

Some of us have confessed that the standard oven beneath a cooktop is a storage spot for little used pots and pans! A purpose-built unit makes more sense. 

Exactly.  In our new apartment that we're renovating from the ground up and designing the kitchen, we decided not to get a built in oven or range. It's only 2 of us, and the most number of people we'd have over would be like 2 people, so we'll never need more oven than our countertop CSO can handle.  Plus, there's a nice deep corner that it will fit in that couldn't be used for much else.  Instead of a normal oven, we put extra cabinet space.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...