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Cookbooks 2021


heidih
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1 minute ago, Anna N said:

Thanks. One can only hope that the language of the book itself rises above the level in its promotional material. 

 

“The Devil's Dinner is the first authoritative history of chili peppers. There are countless books on cooking with chilies, but no book goes into depth about the biological, gastronomical, and cultural impact this forbidden fruit has had upon people all over the world. The story has been too hot to handle.”

 

Yes, that is quite the cliché fest.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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4 minutes ago, weinoo said:

That looks good...I hope it has even more to offer than:

 

 

I'm not expecting "The Devil's Dinner" to be so much a recipe book; more about the culture behind the things. But till it comes out, who knows?

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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10 hours ago, liuzhou said:

I'm not expecting "The Devil's Dinner" to be so much a recipe book; more about the culture behind the things. But till it comes out, who knows?

 

On the amazon.com page (eG-friendly Amazon.com link) it has 8 ratings (all 5 stars) and 2 reviews (nothing useful unfortunately, the longest one is 10 words).

 

 

If you are interested in chili peppers history and culture then there are these books too:

Heather Arndt Anderson - "Chillies A Global History" (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

Foster + Cordell - "Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas Gave the World" (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

Jenny Linford - "The Seven Culinary Wonders of the World: A History of Honey, Salt, Chile, Pork, Rice, Cacao, and Tomato" (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

I haven't seen anyone of them so I can't comment. Usually the "A Global History" series is well done, those books are written by university professors / researchers.

 

 

 

Teo

 

Teo

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Time ago, on another thread, we were discussing on the amount of "not that great" e-books that are being sold, this is a perfect example:

Disney Cooking: Recipes to Make at Home: Disney Dishes Homemade (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

I have just a little little little doubt that they paid for the rights on the Disney name. With 61 pages, it must be a really informative book, no? If you open the author's page by clicking on his name, then you'll find that he is an expert on many many different subjects. Must be reliable!

 

 

 

Teo

 

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Teo

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, liuzhou said:

 

I'm not expecting "The Devil's Dinner" to be so much a recipe book; more about the culture behind the things. But till it comes out, who knows?

Well apparently it’s been out since 2018! I think the press release was misleading. 

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, teonzo said:

 

On the amazon.com page (eG-friendly Amazon.com link) it has 8 ratings (all 5 stars) and 2 reviews (nothing useful unfortunately, the longest one is 10 words).

 

 

If you are interested in chili peppers history and culture then there are these books too:

Heather Arndt Anderson - "Chillies A Global History" (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

Foster + Cordell - "Chilies to Chocolate: Food the Americas Gave the World" (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

Jenny Linford - "The Seven Culinary Wonders of the World: A History of Honey, Salt, Chile, Pork, Rice, Cacao, and Tomato" (eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

I haven't seen anyone of them so I can't comment. Usually the "A Global History" series is well done, those books are written by university professors / researchers.

 

 

 

Teo

 

The last one "7 Culinary Wonders" I got at the library when it came out. I thought it well done as it integrates how these immigrants blended into their new cultures.

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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From the NYT, a round-up of recent cookbooks:  Barbecued, Battered, Boiled and Baked: Cookbooks for Summer

Covered are:

Julia Turshen's SIMPLY JULIA: 110 Easy Recipes for Healthy Comfort Food

Hetty McKinnon's TO ASIA, WITH LOVE: Everyday Asian Recipes and Stories From the Heart

Yasmin Khan's RIPE FIGS: Recipes and Stories From Turkey, Greece, and Cyprus

Michael Twitty's RICE

RODNEY SCOTT’S WORLD OF BBQ: Every Day Is a Good Day

Zoë François' ZOË BAKES CAKES: Everything You Need to Know to Make Your Favorite Layers, Bundts, Loaves, and More

Max Halley's MAX’S PICNIC BOOK

 

I own Simply Julia, Zoë Bakes Cakes and Max's Picnic Book and am tempted by Ripe Figs.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, blue_dolphin said:

From the NYT, a round-up of recent cookbooks:  Barbecued, Battered, Boiled and Baked: Cookbooks for Summer

Covered are:

Julia Turshen's SIMPLY JULIA: 110 Easy Recipes for Healthy Comfort Food

Hetty McKinnon's TO ASIA, WITH LOVE: Everyday Asian Recipes and Stories From the Heart

Yasmin Khan's RIPE FIGS: Recipes and Stories From Turkey, Greece, and Cyprus

Michael Twitty's RICE

RODNEY SCOTT’S WORLD OF BBQ: Every Day Is a Good Day

Zoë François' ZOË BAKES CAKES: Everything You Need to Know to Make Your Favorite Layers, Bundts, Loaves, and More

Max Halley's MAX’S PICNIC BOOK

 

I own Simply Julia, Zoë Bakes Cakes and Max's Picnic Book and am tempted by Ripe Figs.

 

 

 

 

I too was tempted by Ripe Figs.  I put a hold on it from the library.  I'd like to see it before I buy.

 

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8 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I too was tempted by Ripe Figs.  I put a hold on it from the library.  I'd like to see it before I buy.

 

Do report back when you get it.  I can ask my library to buy it but that process takes a few months. 

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15 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Do report back when you get it.  I can ask my library to buy it but that process takes a few months. 

 

My library has a copy of Ripe Figs but there are six people in line ahead of me.  I believe the policy is that we order an additional copy of an item when there are more than five holds.

 

Doesn't your library ordinarily buy cookbooks?

 

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2 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Doesn't your library ordinarily buy cookbooks?

They do, and have a pretty good collection for a small library though the number of cookbooks they are buying has decreased significantly over the last year or so. Not sure if that’s a pandemic thing or if there’s a different driver. Historically, they have purchased every cookbook I’ve requested but I haven’t requested any since the pandemic shut them down.  They just resumed limited in-person hours a couple of weeks ago so we’ll see how things sort out. 

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Posted (edited)

I don't know whether it's due to my Google news feed's tuning or a broader media push, but I'm seeing a lot of hype about Rodney Scott's World of BBQ (eG-friendly Amazon.com link). Leite's Culinaria discussed its recipe for Rodney Scott's Whole BBQ Chicken in my newsfeed today (the chicken is spatchcocked, and the recipe looks good). The book looks enticing. I don't need any more cookbooks, even for BBQ! But I may have to buy this one anyway. Maybe I can talk my library into getting it first.

 

eta: they do! I'll be picking it up in a couple of days. 

Edited by Smithy
Updated the post (log)
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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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The above-mentioned Rodney Scott's World of BBQ: Every Day is a Good Day (eG-friendly Amazon.com link) is fun to read. I haven't cooked from it yet, but there are some good-looking recipes I want to try. He prefaces the book with stories of his growing up, his family, and his coming into and developing the business. Every recipe I've looked at has a little story about how it was invented or whom it was named for.

 

He gives detailed instructions on how to build a proper BBQ pit (using firebrick) and how to roast a whole hog. I might fantasize about doing that, but think it's unlikely I'll ever do so. He also talks about cooking over smaller units, and that's where the value will be to me.

 

A clever and attractive cover isn't a good reason for buying a book, but I like this design: the subtitle is printed in glossy finish whereas the rest of the cover is matte finish. You have to tilt the book slightly to see the subtitle. 

 

20210608_100548.jpg

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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  • 2 weeks later...
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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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13 hours ago, Honkman said:

The problem with ATK books is that there is very significant overlap of the recipes between their books - if you have a few of them most likely you have a number of the recipes already

 

I used to have quite a few of their books and while looking for a recipe once I found it duplicated over several of their other books.  I felt taken advantage off, and haven't bought any of their books since.  I get their magazine free through my library and I do read that.  Their recipes work, but they sure to like to repeat their recipes.

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ATK

 

are true Artists of Churn.

 

I discovered this many many many years ago

 

when their books were on ' sale ' at an early amazon for

 

40 % off.  then Google decided they were going to

 

create a ' bill pay ' system , a bit like PayPal

 

so , you got an additional 20 % off any book @ Amazon

 

and some how , this used your credit card.

 

so I got quite a few ATk and they were worth reading back then

 

then i noticed a dupe , them any more dupes

 

so I called them in Brookline MA , they answered their phone back them

 

and got to an editor.

 

they said at least 40 % / book was ' new '

 

I stopped buying. and used the l9brary.

 

BTW  \doing what they are doing is against the copyright law.

 

you can re-publish material that was copyrighted 

 

but you have to indicate on the InfoPage

 

what those previous CR material was

 

they don't do this .

 

CK  move that same economic model over to

 

MilkStreet

 

but I must say  the current ATK

 

is a manufacturing Cabal of ATK cookbooks.

 

they get first prize for Production.

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Others do this, as well. 

I believe even Ina Garten has admitted she puts a roast chicken recipe in all of her cookbooks that's basically the same from cookbook to cookbook.

Not as bad as the culling and repeating ATK does, but still...

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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All of this is Business.

 

perfectly fine , if that's y0our business model

 

but , acknowledge your re-prints

 

by law.

 

than its up to the consumer to deside

 

how many Rx's , the same Rx's ,

 

do you want to buy

 

 

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