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Inverse puff — marble?


paul o' vendange
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In all these years,  I’ve never done inverse puff.  All I’ve made is classic puff or amended for croissants, etc., but have never used inverse nor have I tasted it.

 

I’ve always just used a good wooden workbench.  For inverse, presuming a room temp if 68F - 72F, how necessary does anyone marble is to do a decent inverse?

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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Well I had to research what inverse puff pastry is.

 

”Inverted puff pastry is lovely even when not perfect.  It’s quite forgiving and has wonderful flaky layers that are light and not greasy or dripping butter as sometimes happens with standard puff pastry.  Inverted puff pastry is being increasingly recommended by pâtissiers like Hermé and Mercotte, the French blogger and Meilleur Pâtissier presenter.”

 

“For standard puff pastry the butter is wrapped inside a détrempe (layer of flour, water and a little butter) then rolled out and folded various times to create layers.  With inverted puff pastry the butter (mixed with some flour) is the outer layer and the détrempe is folded inside.”

 

Quoted from :

here.

I can certainly understand why someone would want to attempt it. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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I  live in a Mediterranean climate and do not heat the house. I have what are considered cold fast hands in the pastry context. I've used the ceramic tile counter in some kitchens and since marble/granite is pretty I've either had a piece set in the counter or aside to use. 18" x 18" from marble yard = dirt cheap. But really I find quick hand and not over working brings lovely puff. I've tried many methods and never been disappointed. Share your experiments. 

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Thanks Anna.  I’ve read wonderful things about it too.  It seems more difficult to master, so looking forward to the challenge.  I’ve read chilled marble, cold room and hands are almost a necessity, which makes sense.  Never worked on marble - outside my actually starting my cooking life going gonzo over La Technique and pastry most especially, been very much on the savory side.

 

Thanks for the info!

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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

I  live in a Mediterranean climate and do not heat the house. I have what are considered cold fast hands in the pastry context. I've used the ceramic tile counter in some kitchens and since marble/granite is pretty I've either had a piece set in the counter or aside to use. 18" x 18" from marble yard = dirt cheap. But really I find quick hand and not over working brings lovely puff. I've tried many methods and never been disappointed. Share your experiments. 

 

Thanks Heidi, very helpful.  I have to laugh as I’m afraid my hands are likely the polar opposites to you.  Typing this is excruciatingly cumbersome as my thumb is thick and ungainly and I can’t look at butter without its melting in stark terror.   Thanks to an early fever for all things French and thanks to Jacques for lighting a lifelong fire for fundamentals (to a fault), I’ve been able to stumble through well enough as needed on pastry but too keenly aware at my relatively feeble technical and imaginative mastery.  

 

C’est la vie.  Careme’s spirit will have to wait for the next life, 😏

 

I really appreciate your post, thanks.  What a beautiful place to write from, and helpful to get your perspective.

 

 

 

Edited by paul o' vendange (log)
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-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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It helps to work in a cool environment and not to dawdle, but you might be surprised how straightforward inverted puff is to make. And the results are definitely worth it, producing a delicate puff that melts in the mouth. 


Enclosing the dough and making the first turn is probably the trickiest part. You want the beurrage (outer butter) to be cool but extensible. If it’s too cold you get lots of cracking and raggedy edges. But once you get that first turn out of the way it’s a remarkably well behaved dough. So have no fear!!

Edited by Pete Fred
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Thanks  Fred.  Great note on the enclosure and first turn.  I find it much the same with “classic” puff so good to know.

 

Who came up with this iteration of feuilletage, anyone know?

-Paul

 

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais

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I agree with what Pete said. The lock-in is a bit trickier than with classic puff, but I actually find the rest of the lamination easier. The butter block is less temperamental and more pliable because of all the flour that's been mixed into it.

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1 hour ago, paul o' vendange said:

Who came up with this iteration of feuilletage, anyone know?


Its modern popularity is down to Pierre Hermé who championed it in the 90s, but I remember reading once that it was an old technique that just never widely caught on. 

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