Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cane sugar for caramel and confections


Recommended Posts

Has anyone ever used sugar made from sugar cane for their caramel and other confections? 

 

Do you have any feedback on how it tastes and works in comparison to regular table sugar (granulated sugar)? Is it more expensive in North America? (I live in Canada).

 

I have noticed that I have liked the flavour of sodas such as the Mexican drink Jarrito which is flavoured with cane sugar. I tried their cola version and that's where I noticed the flavour difference.

 

There is a supplier that I have recently discovered close to where I live (Edmonton in Alberta) and I am contemplating trying it out to see how different caramel woiuld taste using it. (they also happen to make an invert sugar which I am tempted to buy too)

 

Any thoughts or experience?

 

Celest

Celest Robinson

Shade Tree Chocolate Studio Ltd.

There is always so much more to learn....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't table sugar cane sugar? My childhood remembered jingle " C & H pure cane sugar from Hawaii". Most common table sugar.  The Mexican coke drama is with respect to corn syrup I think. US uses corn syrup; Mexico cane.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, heidih said:

Isn't table sugar cane sugar? My childhood remembered jingle " C & H pure cane sugar from Hawaii". Most common table sugar.  The Mexican coke drama is with respect to corn syrup I think. US uses corn syrup; Mexico cane.

I thought most granulated sugar was made from sugar beets as opposed to cane sugar.  If it's not specific, I'd assume it was made from sugar beets.

Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, heidih said:

Isn't table sugar cane sugar? My childhood remembered jingle " C & H pure cane sugar from Hawaii". Most common table sugar.  The Mexican coke drama is with respect to corn syrup I think. US uses corn syrup; Mexico cane.

 

I could be wrong but I have read Mexican coke production switched over to corn syrup for their domestic market, although they still export cane sugar coke to the US.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy this sugar from Costco.  It is more expensive but tastes way better.  The one picture shows you the difference in colour between pure cane sugar and regular sugar.  Sorry I can't be of more help.

20210117_165313.jpg

20210117_164944.jpg

20210117_164954.jpg

Edited by ElsieD (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not seen sugar on shelves here from sugar beets but I know it is the cheaper source processed for granulated. Even the generic in my pantry is from cane but maybe we were brainwashed being across from Hawaii ;) The point OP made about the Mexican soda taste was what I was addressing. There is also the plastic v. glass bottle theory re sda. But for baking and confectionary maybe a more experienced person than I can address beet v cane.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh Interesting.... I better check my assumptions and check what the sugar is made out.  Thanks for your comments guys and I"ll see if our Costco has that cane sugar instead of the regular Rogers brand.

Celest Robinson

Shade Tree Chocolate Studio Ltd.

There is always so much more to learn....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, cane sugar for all boiled confections. 

 

Mostly wanted to chime in about the costco organic sugar. Personally I love it for coating pate de fruit. I don't like using regular granulated sugar for coating the jellies, and I tried sugar in the raw, but the crystal is a bit too large. The kirkland organic cane sugar has a grain size inbetween the two, personally I think the jellies look nice when coated with it. 

Edited by minas6907 (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

In Spain, sugar comes from beetroots. I read that the USA border citizens try to get coca cola from México, because it is made from cane sugar and not corn syrup.

 

I try always to use moscovado sugar for everything.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, heidih said:

I have not seen sugar on shelves here from sugar beets but I know it is the cheaper source processed for granulated. Even the generic in my pantry is from cane but maybe we were brainwashed being across from Hawaii ;) The point OP made about the Mexican soda taste was what I was addressing. There is also the plastic v. glass bottle theory re sda. But for baking and confectionary maybe a more experienced person than I can address beet v cane.

soda in glass bottles 100% tastes different / better than soda in plastic bottles. the difference is actually a little profound, i think.

 

i don’t drink it much these days and stick to diet if i do but even that tastes noticeably different in my experience. 

 

i am skeptical that most can tell a difference with regards to sugar and syrup in a blind test though. 

 

to be slightly on topic of course, like the rest of the north americans here i only really use cane sugar for granulated sugar and it obviously works fine for caramels and things. 

 

i’ve been exploring other sugars lately though. would be fun to do a coconut caramel that only uses different aspects of coconut everywhere in the recipe for example. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Beet sugar is more likely to be found in Europe - North America is pretty exclusively cane sugar.  

 

Yeah, all sugar is beet sugar here. I mean, I can buy cane sugar if I really want to - but the standard stuff is made from beets.

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Beet sugar is more likely to be found in Europe - North America is pretty exclusively cane sugar.  

In the US (Mid-Atlantic region), beet sugar is quite common.  When I was keeping bees, I was taught to avoid it (right or wrong) when I made syrup to help the bees bulk up for winter.  Often (but not always) store brands were beet sugar.  Sometimes Dominoe was the only available came sugar and it was typically a bit more expensive than the beet sugars.

 

(Nota bene: It has been more than five years since I last had to feed bees).

Edited by donk79 (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll have to look up the source again, but in Canada pretty much all granulated sugar is cane sugar. There's only one refinery in the country, located in Western Canada and owned by Rogers, that produces beet sugar.

 

"To purchase Alberta-made Rogers sugar, look for a packaging stamp that starts with the number 22. This means the sugar is from Taber [the bet sugar plant]."

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, donk79 said:

In the US (Mid-Atlantic region), beet sugar is quite common.  When I was keeping bees, I was taught to avoid it (right or wrong) when I made syrup to help the bees bulk up for winter.  Often (but not always) store brands were beet sugar.  Sometimes Dominoe was the only available came sugar and it was typically a bit more expensive than the beet sugars.

 

(Nota bene: It has been more than five years since I last had to feed bees).

Minnesota and North Dakota have traditionally grown a lot of US beets. Louise Erdrich territory. Remember "The Beet Queen?"

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/18/2021 at 1:48 PM, Cahoot said:

I'll have to look up the source again, but in Canada pretty much all granulated sugar is cane sugar. There's only one refinery in the country, located in Western Canada and owned by Rogers, that produces beet sugar.

 

"To purchase Alberta-made Rogers sugar, look for a packaging stamp that starts with the number 22. This means the sugar is from Taber [the bet sugar plant]."

 

Thanks for that info. That's pretty interesting.    I found, and was also contacted by a cane sugar refinery? in Edmonton, which started me on this journey. They provide granulated sugar but I think their first product was to create liquid sugar for the bee / honey industry. I think Alberta is #5 in the world for honey production. Lots of good research happening here on bees too.

 

Celest Robinson

Shade Tree Chocolate Studio Ltd.

There is always so much more to learn....

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...