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Lunch 2021


liuzhou
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My imaginary Austrian granny would be proud of me! Button dumplings and scrambled eggs.

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Tyrolean-style cheese-bread fried dumplings in a broth of beef shin.

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Sauerkraut is a typical side dish. I like mine raw with crispy-fried Speck (a type of smoked bacon).

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2/3 of Austria looks like this:

BjoZNmI.jpg

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9 hours ago, rotuts said:

@BonVivant

 

"" Sauerkraut is a typical side dish. I like mine raw ""

 

im not sure what you mean by this.

 

i this what I might call coleslaw ?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleslaw

Raw sauerkraut is just kraut right out of the crock/jar that is still fermenting.  Heating kraut kills the probiotics and the kraut is no longer considered raw.  No translation needed.

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1 hour ago, lemniscate said:

Raw sauerkraut is just kraut right out of the crock/jar that is still fermenting.  Heating kraut kills the probiotics and the kraut is no longer considered raw.  No translation needed.


... and it has the effect of the Khmer Rouge invading your lower intestines. No translation needed 🤭

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1 hour ago, lemniscate said:

Raw sauerkraut is just kraut right out of the crock/jar that is still fermenting.  Heating kraut kills the probiotics and the kraut is no longer considered raw.  No translation needed.

I had a baked sauerkraut casserole in Germany which was a revelation. My husband who swore he hated sauerkraut found it much more to his liking when it was baked and served as a side dish. So perhaps there is a need to distinguish for those to whom sauerkraut means always straight out of the pickling container. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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Just now, Duvel said:


... and it has the effect of the Khmer Rouge invading your lower intestines. No translation needed 🤭

Our postings crossed in the ethernet. But if I have your attention how frequent is it to serve sauerkraut as part of a baked dish in Germany as opposed to serving it straight out of the container? Is it regional?

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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4 minutes ago, Anna N said:

Our postings crossed in the ethernet. But if I have your attention how frequent is it to serve sauerkraut as part of a baked dish in Germany as opposed to serving it straight out of the container? Is it regional?


Sauerkraut baked with potatoes in a casserole is a common dish (as both ingredients are widespread and popular, so are all their linear combinations). There is a lasagna-type dish layering Sauerkraut, mashed potatoes and Leberwurst (liver sausage) from the area around Heilbronn (about 1h from here). I hade that dish made with blood sausage once in a brew pub in Heidelberg, so I’d assume there is a regional touch to it.

In the north, where I hail from, Sauerkraut is exclusively boiled with cured meats. Boiling destroys the lactic bateria (that lead to the Khmer Rouge effect) and - contrary to popular opinion - actually increases the bioavailability of the vitamin C (so makes it more “healthy”.

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No pics, but we had sauerkraut in the form of choucroute and bratwurst the other night.     Luscious, mellow and very digestible.    I braise "good", jarred from Bavaria, or cold pack fresh sauerkraut in duck fat and butter with a thinly sliced onion, garlic clove, white wine, chicken broth, black peppercorns, juniper berries, bay leaf until the liquid is absorbed and kraut silken.    i even like it cold. next day.   

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eGullet member #80.

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7 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

No pics, but we had sauerkraut in the form of choucroute and bratwurst the other night.     Luscious, mellow and very digestible.    I braise "good", jarred from Bavaria, or cold pack fresh sauerkraut in duck fat and butter with a thinly sliced onion, garlic clove, white wine, chicken broth, black peppercorns, juniper berries, bay leaf until the liquid is absorbed and kraut silken.    i even like it cold. next day.   

Good to throw some sliced apples into it when you're doing that, as well.

 

I've been on a salad kick. Picked up one on the way home Saturday, and had to throw most of it out because not only had they put a host of the dreaded GBPs on it, they were chopped in tiny pieces and difficult to pick out.  A shame, because it was a damn fine salad. So, having lettuce in the house from my Misfits box, I betook myself to Kroger after church and bought cheese, proscuitto and salami to chop up in one, along with some chicken breasts to roast and add to another one later in the week, along with some mandarin orange segments. The polluted salad had a good raspberry viniagrette, so I picked up a bottle of Newman's Own in that flavor, along with one of poppy seed to make cole slaw with the half-head of cabbage I had left over from St. Pats. 

 

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Also contemplating a Reuben salad, with corned beef and Swiss. I have a bottle of Thousand Island on hand...

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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55 minutes ago, Anna N said:

I had a baked sauerkraut casserole in Germany which was a revelation. My husband who swore he hated sauerkraut found it much more to his liking when it was baked and served as a side dish. So perhaps there is a need to distinguish for those to whom sauerkraut means always straight out of the pickling container. 

 

I grew up with cooked sauerkraut dishes, almost never had it raw that I can remember.  Kapusta is a Polish noodle sauerkraut casserole with dried mushrooms and a lot of butter.  It's still on my top 5 fave list.

 

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We love the tang of canned sauerkraut – the cheaper, the better.  We don’t mind it heated, but often don’t bother with that. 

 

Friday:

IMG_5311.jpg.7586c5dfc070a9ffd473f073a75071ac.jpg

 

Saturday was our 39th wedding anniversary.  As I said in the Breakfast thread, we decided to have a safe celebration like we did last year.  Just an aimless drive with a few stops to pick up food or walk a little.  Lunch was at a place I’ve been frequenting since before I was born.  It is in Arlington VA and has been open since 1957.  Pizza and subs. 

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I’ve always joked that you only liked the pizza if, like me, you had to have been inoculated by it in utero:

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Mr. Kim does like it, though. 

 

I do like the pizza.  But what I’m really here for is my favorite sandwich in the entire world:

IMG_5332.jpg.513cd0a588094b09ee0d3d80f2d5bcf6.jpg  

It is a ham, steak, and cheese sub with grilled onions, slaw, mayo, and pizza sauce.

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Had apptns in Wpg yesterday, so I was able to grab some goodies at the Chinese supermarket.

 

Made a  cheater Pho for lunch with a Pho spices bag, Vietnamese rice noodles, slices of beef sirloin, yu choy, beansprouts, Thai basil, and fresh green peppercorns. I tossed in a couple of Thai lime leaves as I love the fragrance.

 

                                                                                                                      1449976093_PhoatHome3641.jpg.b281e9cf5f968dba75d1245ee4f936d0.jpg

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Dejah

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4 hours ago, Dejah said:

Had apptns in Wpg yesterday, so I was able to grab some goodies at the Chinese supermarket.

 

Made a  cheater Pho for lunch with a Pho spices bag, Vietnamese rice noodles, slices of beef sirloin, yu choy, beansprouts, Thai basil, and fresh green peppercorns. I tossed in a couple of Thai lime leaves as I love the fragrance.

 

                                                                                                                      1449976093_PhoatHome3641.jpg.b281e9cf5f968dba75d1245ee4f936d0.jpg

I love the combination of fresh green peppercorns, kaffir lime leaves and grachai - also called finger root.

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A childhood lunch:

IMG_5414.jpg.907c25fc9263feade36b2c5306f9733c.jpg

My mother almost never ate a whole sandwich at home.  It was always a "foldover".  The bread wasn't cut - sandwich was made flat and then...folded over itself.  I wonder if other families do this.  Mr. Kim hadn't ever heard of a fold over.  I've converted him, though.  Now, when he's just a little hungry, he'll make himself a foldover.  Served with a couple of sweet petites and chippy-dip.  

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