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21 minutes ago, heidih said:

@rotuts and @gfweb I have never used  pressure cooker or iPot. Is there a difference from simmering and boiling because they do not that evaporation and concentration process going on? 


The pressure cooker does not really agitate the broth. That’s why pc’ed stocks comenout pretty clear. For the ramen soup I envisioned, you are aiming for the opposite ...

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@Duvel 

 

OK

 

but not so OK unless you can try an iPot

 

as a comparison,

 

Id send yoyu one

 

but I cant,

 

Voltage This,  Voltage that

 

Amp this , Amps that

 

then

 

the customs people 

 

etc.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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3 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Duvel 

 

OK

 

but not so OK unless you can try an iPot

 

as a comparison,

 

Id send yoyu one

 

but I cant,

 

Voltage This,  Voltage that

 

Amp this , Amps that

 

then

 

the customs people 

 

etc.


I understand that the iPot is a regulated pressure cooker. I cooked many stocks in my regular pressure cooker, and none turned out emulsified. As the pressure inside the pot is regulated there is no boiling retardation and the associated bumps that aid the emulsification. So, even if the iPot would be - in terms of control - far more advantageous than a regular PC I am afraid it reaches it‘s limits here as well ...

 

 

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

@rotuts and @gfweb I have never used  pressure cooker or iPot. Is there a difference from simmering and boiling because they do not that evaporation and concentration process going on? 

 

As far as stock-making the PC greatly speeds things up. The stock tastes as good to me as simmered.  It will need concentrating after the PC

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@rotutsfear not!  Nary a single dreaded GBP touched my pizza.  It was an orange one.  I hate GBPs too.  They are guaranteed to give all indigestion.  

 

Tonight, roasted chicken with radishes, mashed potatoes, and butternut squash.  This chicken dish finished off my glut of watermelon and daikon radishes from the CSA box.  It was getting desperate--one bag of radishes was dated 12-7!  After I conquer the giant kohlrabi they gave me last week, I should be back on track for a normal crisper drawer.

 

277923081_roastchickenwithradishes.thumb.jpg.8b8adf52beb37003625fa3d6619e2218.jpg

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On 3/6/2021 at 12:26 PM, chromedome said:

I routinely season them after the initial sear, and (now that I've had them all plain for comparison/evaluation purposes) usually give them a lick of soy and Worcestershire sauce as well, for added umami.

 

Same thing I did/do with beef burgers, as far as that goes.

 

If I'm working with the loose faux-ground to make my patties, I incorporate those into the "meat" before shaping my patties.

Well, my mother doesn't eat beef without it being seasoned with Worcestershire sauce. He dad cooked it that way and she keeps a supply on hand (along with mayo). Things get serious if we are low on either 😁.

Her husband couldn't figure out her obsession with Worcestershire, and I told him it covers up the meat taste 😑. So I added it to the impossible as well. Then she said, you sure there's no meat in this? 

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Tonight’s dinner was leftovers from last night’s beef pot pie. 

 

44A836B9-3119-4D29-BC60-B37643891E6F.jpeg.b586b44076fa127c6219ff91433874c7.jpeg

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Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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I had planned a Caribbean Beef Stew for supper, but my cousin dropped off ANOTHER TWO packages of the Costco Kirkland Polish Beef Sausages! I still have 2 pks of 15 sausages each all separated and frozen in the freezer. So that's what we had for supper.
Not sure why they are labeled sausages when they are wieners. These are the ones they serve at the Costco food counters.
I love raw onions with mine, but hubby likes them slightly cooked. Sweet and Spicy mustard, mixed veg, and oven baked potato wedges = satisfying supper. Tomorrow - dropping off a pkg to our son and family, and some to other friends.

As much as we enjoy these as hot dogs, too much of a good thing will spoil hot dogs over a camp fire!

                                                                                                 1386786655_PolishSausage3448.jpg.979fff4c3b4a322b8a0573777637449a.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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I had been avoiding shopping in person because of the pandemic, but opportunity presented and I was double masked.  Dinner was coleslaw with a Kenji smash burger.  Aji Amarillo.  I enjoy eating Aji Amarillo almost as much as saying it.

 

The smash burger provided a chance to test out my Demeyere searing pan, as well a a new Lampson heavy duty turner.  Both more than lived up to expectations.

 

The problem was getting the Demeyere hot enough.  My Paragon induction is underpowered.  I saw the temperature briefly spike above 300C.  But I couldn't get a stable reading much above 250C.  Kenji calls for a non-emissive cooking surface up to 370C/700F.  Next time I'll try the Demeyere directly on the stovetop and see if I can get it hotter.

 

Nonetheless the burger was good and cleanup was spectacularly easy.  No splatter mess at all.

 

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17 hours ago, Duvel said:

Steeped at 178 F (as per Ivan Orkin)

 

Oh man, now you got me going...

682113803_toIvanRamen.jpeg.21f56384bf6cbbd74f5350d4956098c5.jpeg

If I walk at my usual speed, 6 minutes!

 

You didn't tell us about what noodles you used...Ivan's are rye based, at least here.

 

And so you can really experience it...

 

341030750_2015_05IvanRamen.thumb.JPG.a93fad1ea12315801d90894f45bafd12.JPG\

 

42290931_2015_07IvanPastrami.thumb.JPG.6cc6e4acde76bc516754703e5c1dc362.JPG

 

Pastrami buns.

 

Good job on the ramen.

 

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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1 hour ago, weinoo said:

 

Oh man, now you got me going...

682113803_toIvanRamen.jpeg.21f56384bf6cbbd74f5350d4956098c5.jpeg

If I walk at my usual speed, 6 minutes!

 

You didn't tell us about what noodles you used...Ivan's are rye based, at least here.

 

And so you can really experience it...

 

341030750_2015_05IvanRamen.thumb.JPG.a93fad1ea12315801d90894f45bafd12.JPG\

 

42290931_2015_07IvanPastrami.thumb.JPG.6cc6e4acde76bc516754703e5c1dc362.JPG

 

Pastrami buns.

 

Good job on the ramen.

 

 

no shot of the main event?

Edited by KennethT (log)
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3 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

You didn't tell us about what noodles you used...Ivan's are rye based, at least here.


I used a commercial product. My plan is to make some for the next batch now that I have the soup in the freezer.

 

Ivan Ramen uses about 8% rye in their ramen noodles. In Japan, the addition of a certain percentage of different flours (usually wheat, differently milled or with more bran) has gained popularity in recent years.

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23 minutes ago, mgaretz said:

Anniversary dinner.  Sirloin steak, cooked SV then seared, served with steamed spinach with butter and steamed summer squash.

 

sirloin-sp-sq.jpg.5900c6739770b8f50ec0c6e04e26ee25.jpg

 

Happy Anniversary! Ours is coming up later this week. No menu plan...yet

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22 hours ago, Raamo said:

Ab's recipe for Shakshuka which may not really be Shakshuka but either way it's darn good

 

Seems mostly legit. Preserved lemons are not very common in shakshukas in Israel, but not unheard of and surely not un-traditional. One thing is that the recipe sounds very sweet, with the tomato paste and sugar both. If you have decent tomatoes and peppers, then they should be sweet enough once cooked down and reduced. Same with the vinegar, seems quite a lot.

I'll also mention that there are endless versions - some with a sauce cooked for a long while - deep and sweet. Some cooked for minutes - bright and fresh.

Make sure you have good fluffy bread to eat it with (shakshuka is rarely eaten with pita). If you have leftovers, they are great in a sandwich (challah bread is best, but a pita or a good sub also works).

And while not everyone share my tastes, I also have to encourage people to try and serve shakshuka with lemony tahini sauce, which together is one of my favorite things.

Sorry for all the text, is it so obvious that I love shakshuka?

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~ Shai N.

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Food therapy...aggravating day, lasagne leftovers in the freezer...hit the spot. Remembering that the original version was a little dry, I added watered down tomato sauce to the pan for the noodles to hydrate a bit while reheating. Good results.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Not sure what to denote a meal served at 6:00 pm.  I tried Kenji's New York Times potato starch scrambled eggs.  I found the texture weird.  Served with APO toast and jelly.  Got the job done.

 

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Comfort food like Mama used to make, except I don’t cook the broccoli to death. (Sorry, Mom.)

 

279FE647-FBC3-4589-8A73-31D0E5D02D34.jpeg.a00d97b853741aae8714dfb7ac520eec.jpeg

 

 

 

Trying to show that the meatloaf isn’t burnt. 
 

1073BA5B-8457-4611-B708-F44B391D4B49.jpeg.e3097cc8c9eedcb43475d40ca5dfd043.jpeg

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Dear Food: I hate myself for loving you.

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I was preparing some sides for dinner for tomorrow so Charlie went and picked up some Korean food from a restaurant he said was well known for fired chicken and a had just opened one here in Overland Park.  He got some wings that he said were fried then grilled. They were spicy-sweet.  A little sweet a LOT spicy.  I needed to eat some ice cream after.  He also got a dish with vegetables, fish cake and rice cake and some white radish kimchi.  We already had the rest.

20210308_191006.jpg

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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