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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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Just now, rotuts said:

@KennethT 

 

thanks  .  Yikes !

 

I remember when @ happy hour 

 

excellent oysters :  $ 0.25  a piece 

 

There are oyster happy hours here and the oysters tend to run $1 a piece. You just gotta go to a place where they know how to shuck, because when they are careless, the oysters suffer. 

 

But even retail (at the farmer's market, or a good fish monger) oysters tend to run $1.50 each or so.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Some bars where I live, in Atlantic Canada, do still run "buck a shuck" specials to accompany a beverage purchase as cheap wings used to.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I do apologize getting a little Off T :

 

in NYC , and a good oyster place

 

@ happy hour :

 

what's a ' polite ' number to order ?

 

Not so polite number , but less than one

 

that would get you thrown out ?

Edited by rotuts (log)
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9 minutes ago, rotuts said:

I do apologize getting a little Off T :

 

in NYC , and a good oyster place

 

@ happy hour :

 

what's a ' polite ' number to order ?

 

Not so polite number , but less than one

 

that would get you thrown out ?

Usually, oysters at happy hour are offered by the half dozen and dozen.  Some places that have more than 1 variety usually have 1 type (the least expensive, 'commodity' oyster) for the $1 or $1.25 each (sold by the half or doz) but the special oysters - usually local Long Island or West Coast, small production types, go for $3-4 each and can be purchased by the each.  When the Mermaid Inn was open in our neighborhood (soon to return I've heard), we used to get maybe 3 dozen of the happy hour oysters (and maybe 4 of the special ones for dessert) plus a couple other appetizers and have a nice dinner.

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West coast oysters on the East Coast I have found to be insanely expensive even here in NJ. $4 per oyster. I pay it because they tend to be my favorites. I don’t like large oysters. 
 

Raw clams are much more reasonable and I love those too. At least the cherry stones. 

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4 minutes ago, MetsFan5 said:

 

Raw clams are much more reasonable and I love those too. At least the cherry stones. 

Back when I was a mere infant, I was at a business dinner at the Colony in NYC.    I ordered cherry stones.  I found it difficult to eat them and converse at the same time.    My boss looked over at me with the silent but unmistakable message, "You ordered them; you EAT them."    I' doubt that the other company heads noticed our mute communication or my discomfort, since I expediently dispatched the remainders.    Should have ordered oysters.    Have never ordered cherry stones out since.

eGullet member #80.

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20 hours ago, Wait. Wot said:

 

I'm assuming you started with live fish. Did you catch them? I rank steel head lower than arctic char and above most salmon as our favorite salmonoid fishes. Char was hard to get but Iceland is now farming it. It's much more available but still pricey.

 

 

I've never experienced arctic char, but my curiosity is piqued.  I need suggestions how to cook it.  I now have 0.92 pounds of char in the refrigerator.  It came from the Amazon.

 

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20 hours ago, Wait. Wot said:

 

I'm assuming you started with live fish. Did you catch them? I rank steel head lower than arctic char and above most salmon as our favorite salmonoid fishes. Char was hard to get but Iceland is now farming it. It's much more available but still pricey.

 

 
 

No, these fish do not reside in the Gulf of Mexico.   I’m sure  it’s farmed 

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42 minutes ago, scubadoo97 said:

 
 

No, these fish do not reside in the Gulf of Mexico.   I’m sure  it’s farmed 

"Arctic" being the clue ;) Nice fish.

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57 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I've never experienced arctic char, but my curiosity is piqued.  I need suggestions how to cook it.  I now have 0.92 pounds of char in the refrigerator.  It came from the Amazon.

 

I cook arctic char in a similar way to what I do with salmon - it's similar but milder and not as fatty.

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Stir fried tofu, mushrooms, zucchini, caramelized onion, in shawarma style seasoning (with fenugreek, turmeric, cumin, paprika, allspice, cinnamon, garlic). Tomatoes, tahini sauce, amba.

 

 

PXL_20210920_122431426.jpeg

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~ Shai N.

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Time for smoking outside is getting short.  I did a brisket in the smoker. I did all the smoking outside but when it came time to wrap it, it was getting late so I wrapped it and put it in the refrigerator and finished it in the oven today.  Our local grocery chain, Hen House, has whole briskets for sale occasionally and when they do, their USDA Choice is only $45 to $60.  That is about the same price for Prime brisket at Costco but the two times I got the Choice from Hen House, they turned out juicer and as tender as the Prime from Costco.  I have heard mentioned that their Prime might be dairy cattle, IDK whether or not that makes a difference. I just thought I'd mention it and see if anyone cares to comment.   The one I got for today had a funny shaped round end with a little piece sticking up.  When it got done that piece looked burned but when I cut it off, it was not burned burned.  It was blackened but just under the skin, it was moist and juicy.  I imagine it was like Arthur Bryants original burnt ends.   He'd trim off the blackened ends and put them out for free so people could nibble on them while waiting in line to order.  People started asking other restaurants to put burnt ends on their menu.  The restaurant owners knew there were never going to be enough burnt ends to have as a daily menu item so they came up with what Kansas City's burnt ends are today and not at all like Bryant's was 50 years ago.

 

My smoker was 9 years old in June.  It will probably last longer than I will.

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Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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41 minutes ago, Norm Matthews said:

... the Prime from Costco.  I have heard mentioned that their Prime might be dairy cattle, IDK whether or not that makes a difference. I

 

I can't speak to Costso's possible use of dairy cattle, but FWIW, both in Europe (started in Spain with retired farm oxen) and from premium beef suppliers, male dairy breeds are chosen and raised for their superior beef.   See Flannery Beef.

I have no idea how this compares to or is even similar to Costco prime beef.

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eGullet member #80.

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41 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I can't speak to Costso's possible use of dairy cattle, but FWIW, both in Europe (started in Spain with retired farm oxen) and from premium beef suppliers, male dairy breeds are chosen and raised for their superior beef.   See Flannery Beef.

I have no idea how this compares to or is even similar to Costco prime beef.

The point someone was making about grading beef (if I understood it) was that there are a lot of different kinds of cattle available now and there was basically only one when the USDA grading system was established and the result today is a lot of  all different kinds of beef being graded by only one standard.  For instance, the grade of the whole cow  is determined by the amount of fat in some particular rib (3rd or 4th?)in the cow

Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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