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Happy leftovers:

 

Massaman curry with chunks of buta no kakuni - who would have thought that combining fatty pork and spicy curry works so well (hint: me, me, me ...).

 

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Pad thai a la fridge
 

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This one takes some steps, but you can make changes of course.  It's full of very rich flavors-lamb, caramelized onions, smoked porter stout ale and bleu cheese.  I only eat a small portion, but it's so good. 

Smoked Porter and Lamb Pot Pie with Caramelized Onions-

Alaskan Smoked Porter Lamb and Caramelized Onion Pot Pie.JPG

 

For the lamb and caramelized onions-

2 lbs. lamb stew meat

salt and pepper

1/2 cup flour

1/2 cup olive oil

1 onion, roughly chopped

3 cloves garlic, smashed

2 carrots, chopped

2 stalks of celery, with leaves, chopped

1 bay leaf

1 tbsp. juniper berries

1 1/2 cups Alaska Brewing Smoked Porter

1 1/2 cups beef stock

fresh thyme, rosemary and sage

2 yellow onions, thinly sliced

1 tbsp. olive oil

1 tbsp. butter

1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce

1/2 cup beef stock

 

For the bleu cheese pastry-

2 sheets frozen puff pastry, thawed

2 tsp. cold water

1/3 cup crumbled bleu cheese

 

Braise the lamb and make the caramelized onions-

Heat the oven to 325. Season the lamb meat with salt and pepper, then toss in the flour to coat. Heat the stockpot over medium heat and add 1/4 cup of the olive oil. Working in batches, saute the lamb meat until it's browned on all sides, about 6 minutes. Transfer the lamb meat to a plate.

 

Add the remaining 1/4 cup olive oil to the stockpot and add the carrots, celery, bay leaf, and juniper berries. Cook for 3 minutes to tenderize the carrots and celery, then pour in the Alaskan Smoked Porter and beef stock to deglaze the pot.

 

Add the thyme, rosemary, and sage. Add the lamb back to the stockpot and stir to combine with the vegetables. Cover and place the stockpot in the oven and let it slowly braise for 4 hours.

 

While the lamb is braising, make the caramelized onions. Heat the butter and olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the sliced onions and toss to coat in the butter and olive oil. Turn the heat down to medium-low and slowly cook the onions for 30 minutes, turning occasionally so they don't burn. Stir in the Worcestershire sauce and beef stock and continue to cook until most of the liquid is evaporated and the onions are sticky.

 

After 4 hours, remove the lamb from the oven. Remove the lamb to a bowl and strain the vegetables out of the sauce. Add the lamb back to the sauce and combine it with the caramelized onions. Taste the sauce and season with salt and pepper.

 

Make the bleu cheese pastry and bake the pie-

Heat the oven to 415. Gently unfold one sheet of puff pastry. Cut a hole or small shape in the center of the puff pastry for an air vent. Whisk the eggs with the water to make the egg wash. Brush the rim of the baking dish with egg wash.

 

Spoon the lamb and onion mixture into the casserole dish. Top with the puff pastry and brush with egg wash. Sprinkle the crumbled bleu cheese on top of the pastry. Bake the pot pie until golden, about 25 minutes. Bring to the table hot and serve right from the casserole dish.

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A while back, while shopping at the Asian market, I picked up what I thought were Cornish hens.  They were frozen and the label was hard to read. I made out "New York Dressed" which I took to mean some kind of seasoning.  I cooked them today. When I took them out of the wrapping, they still had heads and feet.  They had their insides too!. The breast meat was dark.  They were SQUAB, not Cornish hens. I made corn, parsnips and rice to go with them.  I made an orange sauce for them. It's the first time I've had squab.

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8 minutes ago, Norm Matthews said:

A while back, while shopping at the Asian market, I picked up what I thought were Cornish hens.  They were frozen and the label was hard to read. I made out "New York Dressed" which I took to mean some kind of seasoning.  I cooked them today. When I took them out of the wrapping, they still had heads and feet.  They had their insides too!. The breast meat was dark.  They were SQUAB, not Cornish hens. I made corn, parsnips and rice to go with them.  I made an orange sauce for them. It's the first time I've had squab.

20210126_164227.jpg

Sounds like a brave save. Would you do it again? 

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Shrimp, egg, onion, and cheese enchiladas with steamed rapini sprinkled with nutritional yeast and umeboshi vinegar

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2 hours ago, Norm Matthews said:

A while back, while shopping at the Asian market, I picked up what I thought were Cornish hens.  They were frozen and the label was hard to read. I made out "New York Dressed" which I took to mean some kind of seasoning.  I cooked them today. When I took them out of the wrapping, they still had heads and feet.  They had their insides too!. The breast meat was dark.  They were SQUAB, not Cornish hens. I made corn, parsnips and rice to go with them.  I made an orange sauce for them. It's the first time I've had squab.

20210126_164227.jpg

 

Dating myself, of course, but I never hear the word "squab" in any voice except that of Sylvester, salivating over Tweety Bird.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I blame @Eatmywords and this post...

 

Monday night (the fish monger I got this from gets deliveries a few times a week, Monday being the first):

 

IMG_3393.thumb.jpeg.a9c4874f80dcdf4cd3220dfb86b31335.jpeg

 

Black sea bass simply roasted, with lemon, olive oil, scallions. Another pan had cauliflower and sweet potatoes.

 

Now yesterday was a whole other story. Starting with those 2 lbs. of baby artichokes mentioned elsewhere...

 

IMG_3398.thumb.jpeg.878b7c7d8453e6e8aafe2ba97979779c.jpeg

 

Quartered or halved, braised in stock, olive oil, white wine, garlic, lemon, herbs and a touch of saffron. A favorite.

 

Some fancy bean club beans, and Significant Eater said that black bean soup is a favorite of hers...

 

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I live to serve. She really likes this soup as she remembers it from New Mexico, with avocado and sour cream. These are Rancho Gordo's Oxacan Frijol Negro Santanero beans. They're fucking delicious. Much smaller than any black beans I've used before, and they hold their shape quite well. Just great.

 

And...

 

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My go-to: chicken thigh and chorizo paella. since I'd made all that stock, why not?

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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4 hours ago, weinoo said:

I blame @Eatmywords and this post...

 

Monday night (the fish monger I got this from gets deliveries a few times a week, Monday being the first):

 

IMG_3393.thumb.jpeg.a9c4874f80dcdf4cd3220dfb86b31335.jpeg

 

Black sea bass simply roasted, with lemon, olive oil, scallions. Another pan had cauliflower and sweet potatoes.

 

Now yesterday was a whole other story. Starting with those 2 lbs. of baby artichokes mentioned elsewhere...

 

IMG_3398.thumb.jpeg.878b7c7d8453e6e8aafe2ba97979779c.jpeg

 

Quartered or halved, braised in stock, olive oil, white wine, garlic, lemon, herbs and a touch of saffron. A favorite.

 

 

 

Lovely looking fish.

Those adorable artichokes! The saffron was new to me. With the distinctive taste of the buds how does the saffron mingle?

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No pics because we arrived late in the country in 35° weather, snow on the ground -> just get something hot on the table.

A plate of shishitos warmed the fingers, while bowls of spaghetti alla gricia fed the soul    Think of carbonara without eggs, or cacio e pepe with guanciale.   

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eGullet member #80.

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17 hours ago, chromedome said:

 

Dating myself, of course, but I never hear the word "squab" in any voice except that of Sylvester, salivating over Tweety Bird.

And immediately my brain goes to "I tought I taw a Puddy Tat!"

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Greek Gyros (marinated pork neck), with homemade pita bread, zaziki & salad. 

 

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I usually prepare Gyros on the rotisserie, but it was raining so heavily at just about 0 oC, that I decided to put the skewer in the oven and rotate every 10 min a bit manually. Worked pretty well ...

 

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The waiting period was shortened by perusing Ouzo generously ...

 

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Sliced & ready to eat ...

 

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Pita, brushed with olive oil and recrisped ...

 

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Pita Gyros with quick-pickled red cabbage, raw onions & zaziki ...


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Lastly, the full approval from the little one ensures this dish being featured again in our regular rotation 😉

 

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2 minutes ago, mgaretz said:

Hash made with the last of the leftover tri-tip, with potatoes, onion, mushrooms, peas and spinach.

Looks quite amazing and those mushrooms really call out to me! 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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