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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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1 hour ago, BonVivant said:

 

Blue corn tortillas (La Morena brand, the only imported Mexican tortilla brand we have in food hell).

1lnZQtN.jpgl.👌👍

Oh don't feel too sorry for yourself ;) I live in Los Angeles with a huge Hispanic population, Tortillas everywhere but most are very work horse not to swoon over. We have some folks including our @rancho_gordo working on it. And sources like Masienda and more.https://masienda.com/shop/heirloom-blue-mushito-corn/ One of my employees from Michoacan grew up super poor but would tell me about his mom making quesadillas with blue corn tortillas and squash blossoms from their field. Cheese too expensive. I want to try that.

 

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2 hours ago, scamhi said:

which made we look around your area for a butcher. 

Have you tried Black Sage Butcher ? about a 90 minute drive from you.

I see they are two years old situated about a 45 min drive one way away from us (we just moved closer to them a month ago…need to update my profile) Sounds like they get whole animals in.  I have been sick for awhile and was not really cooking a lot so did not know of them.  Thank you for bringing them to my attention.  We will take a drive down there to see them…several great wineries to visit on the way too boot! Cheers

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2 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

I see they are two years old situated about a 45 min drive one way away from us (we just moved closer to them a month ago…need to update my profile) Sounds like they get whole animals in.  I have been sick for awhile and was not really cooking a lot so did not know of them.  Thank you for bringing them to my attention.  We will take a drive down there to see them…several great wineries to visit on the way too boot! Cheers

All good thoughts that you are approaching hail and hearty!

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eGullet member #80.

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PXL_20210912_233026578.PORTRAIT.thumb.jpg.5f9c119223427c2798b4fb79e6548066.jpg

 

I made the traditional Yunnan "beef with mint" (as discussed here) tonight.  It was really tasty and addictive - it will definitely be in heavy rotation!  I assume that the cows from that area would traditionally be quite lean, so I used some ground Elk that I got from Wild Fork; 3 of the 4 herbs (sawtooth, laksa and thai basil) came from my garden and I had the garlic chives left in my fridge for the past 2 weeks left over from another dish.  I can't get fresh Heaven Facing chilies too easily here, so I used 3 Prik Chee Fah (spur chilies) and 1 Thai chili since my wife doesn't have as much of a tolerance for spicy as I do and I wanted to make sure that she enjoyed it.  Served with Thai sticky rice (made in the CSO - which worked amazing for it, btw) and some smacked cucumbers.

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On the topic of dinner meat, I remember back in the day in Edmonton Italian town, there was an old school Italian butcher.  I wanted 4 - 2 inch fillet steaks.  None in his case.  He went into his cold room and slide a half carcass on a rail through the cold barrier to his cutting table.  He lifted the carcass onto his cutting tale.  Processed to cut and pull to expose the fillet.  Looked up and asked me how thick I wanted them.  He cut them out of the animal and wrapped them up.  Slid the carcass back in the cold room.

 

I thought that was one of the coolest things I had experienced.  He served them to me with smile…he was probably 70 years  plus old.

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5 hours ago, KennethT said:

PXL_20210912_233026578.PORTRAIT.thumb.jpg.5f9c119223427c2798b4fb79e6548066.jpg

 

I made the traditional Yunnan "beef with mint" (as discussed here) tonight.  It was really tasty and addictive - it will definitely be in heavy rotation!  I assume that the cows from that area would traditionally be quite lean, so I used some ground Elk that I got from Wild Fork; 3 of the 4 herbs (sawtooth, laksa and thai basil) came from my garden and I had the garlic chives left in my fridge for the past 2 weeks left over from another dish.  I can't get fresh Heaven Facing chilies too easily here, so I used 3 Prik Chee Fah (spur chilies) and 1 Thai chili since my wife doesn't have as much of a tolerance for spicy as I do and I wanted to make sure that she enjoyed it.  Served with Thai sticky rice (made in the CSO - which worked amazing for it, btw) and some smacked cucumbers.

It looks amazing.  How did you make sticky rice in CSO?

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6 hours ago, chefmd said:

It looks amazing.  How did you make sticky rice in CSO?

Thanks!  Sticky rice in the CSO is super simple.  I started soaking the rice in a bowl of cold tap water in the morning. Just prior to steaming I drained and washed several times.  Then I spread it out on a 9" or 10" tamis (I didn't measure it) evenly in about a 3/4" layer leaving a border around the side and poked a few holes around with my finger to allow steam to circulate easier.  I have a few of them from when I used to make the Bouley/Robuchon potato puree.  Thinking back, I probably shouldn't have worried about poking the holes or anything since the whole chamber is filled with steam - it doesn't come from the bottom.. duh...  Anyway, I set the CSO to steam at 210 for like 30 minutes (that's what it was set previously) and turned it on without adding the rice yet - once the chamber was full of steam, I put in the rice for 15 minutes, then changed modes to keep warm at 150 without opening the door and let it sit for another 15-20 minutes or so. That's it.

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Pizza (yay) and football (sigh).  White pizza with prosciutto, arugula, and parmesean

 

207619367_proscuittopizza.thumb.jpg.afedb5e7f224376927bc70e2b60e1dc4.jpg

 

Margharita

 

1691370767_margharitapiza.thumb.jpg.e8426ed5e309b6c04ed16f7810d3cfad.jpg

 

And one with a really tiny but fat eggplant from my CSA box and some roasted mushrooms

 

1125543570_mushroompizza.thumb.jpg.ab4844198b2823198bb2b3dfe7fc1360.jpg

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Bit of Satay tonight. Marinated overnight with a recipe from a Malaysian fellow that I can't find now, but quite memorable.

 

1302523916_IMG_20210912_1549201323.thumb.jpg.72912ada854d4063d0d1a832cc750a8e.jpg

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"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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37 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

@KennethT that’s a brilliant idea to put the rice on a tamis .  I was using the solid tray covered in parchment paper that was lightly oiled.  How is clean up?  Does the rice really stick to the tamis?

 

Cleanup was easy - although I didn't do it.  In general, I cook, my wife cleans...  but I specifically asked her about it and she said it cleaned up really easily.  This makes sense because there wasn't really much to clean - when I removed the tamis from the CSO, I put a plate over it and inverted - after a bit of a jiggle, the whole mass sort of plopped off with only a couple grains remaining that weren't too difficult to remove.

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34 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

That sounds perfect.  I love sticky rice steamed.  A whole new texture.

Thanks for the info 

 

Yes, and I will say that the texture was great - each individual grain was distinct, yet you could pick up a chunk of it and roll it into a ball.

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Last night I served a mini-supra.  Some things from Carla Capalbo's Tasting Georgia.  Thanks for the recollection from @Duvel

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/163014-cerveza-cargols-i-covid-a-summer-in-catalonia/?do=findComment&comment=2310261

 

 

A supra requires drink:

 

Wine09132021.jpg

 

The winemaker is Gogita Makaridze (pp 258-261) from Tejola.  The grape is Otskhanuri Sapere, well aged.

http://gwa.ge/yurdznisjishebi_/otskhanuri-sapere/?lang=en

 

 

Lobio09132021.jpg

 

Lobio (pp 398-399), Rancho Gordo Domingo Rojo long simmered with onion, garlic, cilantro, parsley, mint, marigold...and other things.

 

 

Dinner09132021.jpg

 

Bazhe (pp 350-351), chicken with walnut sauce.  Sadly drink is known to impair one's ability to operate machinery.

 

Excellent walnut sauce is trivial to prepare in the Blendtec Twister Jar.  These were red walnuts.  I wish someday I could visit Georgia.

 

 

 

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42 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Lobio (pp 398-399), Rancho Gordo Domingo Rojo long simmered with onion, garlic, cilantro, parsley, mint, marigold...and other things.

 

 

Dish looks enticing. You pulled me up on the marigold. I remember it being sold in Mexican markets as a saffron color sub. Flavor? Must check markets. I am not a fan of marigold flower smell. 

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

Dish looks enticing. You pulled me up on the marigold. I remember it being sold in Mexican markets as a saffron color sub. Flavor? Must check markets. I am not a fan of marigold flower smell. 

 

Marigold is used extensively in Georgian recipes, both whole petals and ground.  My lobio called for 2 tablespoons dried petals, and the walnut sauce used 1 1/2 teaspoons of ground.  The marigold I have is not the freshest.  My primary Georgian spice purveyor went out of business and I need to source a new supply.

 

Some recipes use marigold leaves.

 

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@rotuts – your “Shepherd’s Pie” sounds good and I love how much gravy there is.  I usually end up making extra beef stock enhanced Bisto because mine sometimes is a little dry. 

 

@JoNorvelleWalker – I use Bell’s poultry seasoning all the time, but I’ve never heard of the gravy.  It is now on my Amazon list!  Thank you! 

 

@Shelby – I always love the look of your tomatoes (we are nearly at the end of our season☹️) and the fig crostata is gorgeous!  Someone on a FB food group I belong to posted doves.  Folks were freaking out.  I told them to chill and call them squab if it made them feel better! Thought of you and Ronnie!

 

@Duvel – oh, dear.  Your schnitzel is lovely.  I’m full of Mexican food, but would make room for one of those.

 

Dinner last Tuesday was a huge cheater feast (except for dessert):

IMG_6997.thumb.jpg.203007b97bd0c7cc797a8b8682fbfff9.jpg

Frozen rolls, Rice a Roni long grain and wild rice mix, frozen chicken Kiev and even a salad mix:

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Served with fresh corn, though:

IMG_6994.jpg.38e994c48690474bc3b79c1c0101466d.jpg

 

Dessert was completely homemade. @gfweb posted a beautiful peach cobbler and posted the recipe for it.  Before vanilla bean ice cream:

IMG_6998.thumb.jpg.117a1c8d7c2fafe74518fd1397e2300d.jpg

 

Jessica made us a delicious dinner on Thursday:

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Napa cabbage salad with a tangy/sweet dressing, cilantro, and toasted ramen noodles, fish (stick) tacos with a Napa slaw, her street corn, and flautas made with Mr. Kim’s BBQ pork, her pickled shallots & pimento cheese.  Just excellent!

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A9DF1EC7-2BF2-4705-9F19-9935FA0A4AD5.thumb.jpeg.76f06513c7a4b2954b2255e2fb6bb6fd.jpeg

 

Rotisserie Chicken, Oven Baked Duck Fat Potatoes and Green Peas: I had purchased the cooked chicken last week, portioned and froze it. For this meal, I preheated the oven to 350F, added some duck fat and the sliced potatoes to a covered dish, and baked for 30 minutes. Then I topped the potatoes with the defrosted portions of chicken, recovered and returned to the oven for another 30 minutes to reheat the chicken and finish the potatoes. The peas were cooked in the microwave from frozen.

 

Edited by robirdstx (log)
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