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Dinner 2021


liuzhou
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1 hour ago, liamsaunt said:

Miso salmon on a mix of udon noodles and squash zoodles that I made from a large summer squash that came in my CSA box, with the last of the huge cabbage my Mom stuck in my fridge while I was on vacation (this was meal #3 using that cabbage), mushrooms, baby bok choy, spinach, cilantro/ginger/garlic/lime, and fresno chiles.

 

1671909777_misosalmon.thumb.jpg.fe3f3f0bcd33397aa3a2086fcd0c7526.jpg

@liamsaunt I love your creations.  So colourful. I'm sure the flavours pop like the colours.  

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35 minutes ago, Norm Matthews said:

Charlie asked for this yesterday. It took all morning to make Puerto Rican Empanadas from scratch but it is done and all I am going to do in the kitchen today.

20210818_152110.jpg

And the filling in those lovelies is?

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22 hours ago, Raamo said:

Tonight, Gumbo!

 

Chicken sausage instead of Pork, and just Filé Powder - we don't care for Okra.

 

20210817_181542.thumb.jpg.07733441bccfb66982898a9191cff7e6.jpg

 

Took most of the afternoon to make, dark dark rue in an oven is a good trick.

 

I only made 1/2 a recipe, I'll do a full one next time.

We love gumbo and I make it much more frequently since discovering the oven roux method. Yours looks amazing and has given me a craving.

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1 hour ago, Norm Matthews said:

Charlie asked for this yesterday. It took all morning to make Puerto Rican Empanadas from scratch but it is done and all I am going to do in the kitchen today.

20210818_152110.jpg


Respect 

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

And the filling in those lovelies is?

PICADILLO 

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 2 heaping tablespoons sofrito
  • 1/2 cup (4 ounces) canned tomato sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Spanish olives, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon adobo
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Dash of dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 medium potato, peeled and cubed small
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14 minutes ago, Norm Matthews said:

PICADILLO 

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 2 heaping tablespoons sofrito
  • 1/2 cup (4 ounces) canned tomato sauce
  • 2 tablespoons Spanish olives, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon adobo
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Dash of dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 medium potato, peeled and cubed small

Charlie is a very lucky son.

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Over the weekend I was going through some old photos and came across some photos I had taken in Hanoi back in 2006.  Ever since, I couldn't get the memory of a certain dish out of my head, so I decided to make it - even though I've never seen a recipe that looked even close to what the real thing was.  It seems like everyone in the US knows about Cha Ca La Vong... which, in itself, drives me crazy and makes me want to strangle the first person here who started it.  The name of the dish is Cha Ca (or more specifically Chả Cá).  La Vong is the name of the restaurant that either first made it or popularized it, depending on what you read.  But when people call the dish, "Cha Ca La Vong" it drives me nuts... just my pet peeve.  Anyway, the rest of the lore is true - the name of the street is Pho Cha Ca (Pho = street) and there are several restaurants selling Cha Ca on Pho Cha Ca.  But this is pretty common in that section of Hanoi, where many streets are named after the preponderance of shops that sell it.  For instance, there is Silk Street, where there is silk store after silk store...  Sort of like in old NYC where we have the Garment District, the Diamond District, the Lighting District, etc.

 

Unfortunately, I don't have a charcoal brazier for my apartment, and if I did, I'd probably set off every smoke alarm in the building....

 

But anyway, here's my Cha Ca Halibut:

 

PXL_20210816_001214572.PORTRAIT.thumb.jpg.2c59ba24c32c18b15aebcd667ea1e8b2.jpg

Please excuse my use of the wrong rice noodle - I thought I had rice vermicelli, but when I took out the package, I realized they were mung bean noodles which are not interchangeable.  So these are like Banh Pho - like the noodles you'd see in Pho.

 

Just for fun, this is the only photo of mine that I could find of the real thing:

 

IMG_0422.thumb.JPG.8afdf32cce7e72e5ede8d0420d835976.JPG

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12 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Over the weekend I was going through some old photos and came across some photos I had taken in Hanoi back in 2006.  Ever since, I couldn't get the memory of a certain dish out of my head, so I decided to make it - even though I've never seen a recipe that looked even close to what the real thing was.  It seems like everyone in the US knows about Cha Ca La Vong... which, in itself, drives me crazy and makes me want to strangle the first person here who started it.  The name of the dish is Cha Ca (or more specifically Chả Cá).  La Vong is the name of the restaurant that either first made it or popularized it, depending on what you read.  But when people call the dish, "Cha Ca La Vong" it drives me nuts... just my pet peeve.  Anyway, the rest of the lore is true - the name of the street is Pho Cha Ca (Pho = street) and there are several restaurants selling Cha Ca on Pho Cha Ca.  But this is pretty common in that section of Hanoi, where many streets are named after the preponderance of shops that sell it.  For instance, there is Silk Street, where there is silk store after silk store...  Sort of like in old NYC where we have the Garment District, the Diamond District, the Lighting District, etc.

 

Unfortunately, I don't have a charcoal brazier for my apartment, and if I did, I'd probably set off every smoke alarm in the building....

 

But anyway, here's my Cha Ca Halibut:

 

PXL_20210816_001214572.PORTRAIT.thumb.jpg.2c59ba24c32c18b15aebcd667ea1e8b2.jpg

Please excuse my use of the wrong rice noodle - I thought I had rice vermicelli, but when I took out the package, I realized they were mung bean noodles which are not interchangeable.  So these are like Banh Pho - like the noodles you'd see in Pho.

 

Just for fun, this is the only photo of mine that I could find of the real thing:

 

IMG_0422.thumb.JPG.8afdf32cce7e72e5ede8d0420d835976.JPG

I've never had the pleasure but remember reading about it in an excellent old paperback on Vietnamese cuisine that Crag Claiborne wrote the intro to. The use of dill with the turmeric intrigued me. Your images are not clear enough for me to discern dill but was prominent? 

https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/the-classic-cuisine-of-vietnam_bach-ngo_

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33 minutes ago, heidih said:

I've never had the pleasure but remember reading about it in an excellent old paperback on Vietnamese cuisine that Crag Claiborne wrote the intro to. The use of dill with the turmeric intrigued me. Your images are not clear enough for me to discern dill but was prominent? 

https://www.thriftbooks.com/w/the-classic-cuisine-of-vietnam_bach-ngo_

Dill is VERY prominent.

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1 hour ago, KennethT said:

Dill is VERY prominent.

In the recipe I use, dill and turmeric get married and have a baby; the dill and the turmeric share the stage and make something new. I've only had the dish at one Viet restaurant near me in the East Bay. That was my inspiration, and I like mine better, having never been to Hanoi and nothing to compare them to. I make Cha ca Black Cod. I suspect the restaurant version used tilapia, a fish I really don't care for. Although how would you know? I am guessing there are plenty of other bland generic tasting fish in the sea or the farm. When I first heard of "Tilapia" I thought it was a made-up fish. I can certainly imagine it is good with halibut.  I love that picture of the charcoal set up.

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7 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

In the recipe I use, dill and turmeric get married and have a baby; the dill and the turmeric share the stage and make something new. I've only had the dish at one Viet restaurant near me in the East Bay. That was my inspiration, and I like mine better, having never been to Hanoi and nothing to compare them to. I make Cha ca Black Cod. I suspect the restaurant version used tilapia, a fish I really don't care for. Although how would you know? I am guessing there are plenty of other bland generic tasting fish in the sea or the farm. When I first heard of "Tilapia" I thought it was a made-up fish. I can certainly imagine it is good with halibut.  I love that picture of the charcoal set up.

I seem to remember that the one I had in Hanoi was made either with catfish or basa or something like that.  I gussied it up using halibut, but that wouldn't be common (or even exist?) in Hanoi.

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My husband had dental work done yesterday and wanted soft food for dinner.  I had a 3 lb. eggplant in my fridge to use up (another large vegetable that my Mom stuck in my fridge while I was on vacation), so I made baingan bharta.  I served it with rice with lemon, black mustard seeds, and curry leaves (the rice recipe called for peanuts too but I left them out to keep the meal soft), and some flatbread. This meal finished up the stealth vegetable delivery from my Mom...until the next time she sneaks stuff in here when I am not looking 🤣 

 

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Husband headed to the country so I'm back in funky dinner mode.    ->Things he doesn't like.    A San Francisco classic, Joe's Special: ground beef, spinach, eggs.   Garnished at will.   Me? Catsup and Ranch.   Yum.

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eGullet member #80.

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On 8/17/2021 at 2:22 AM, liuzhou said:

 

Pennae?

 

typing too quickly and didn't notice the typo. My fingers sometimes like to add letters. oops

 

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37 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

A favorite of mine but you can make mine without ranch.

Indeed.   Ranch is my own idiosyncratic addition, in fact this was the first time I added it.    Joe's is fine on its own and a canvas for your current splash.

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eGullet member #80.

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Turkey cutlets pan sautéed with garlic, capers, lemon juice, chicken stock, parsley and butter. With roasted cauliflower.

with a new vintage of L'Anglore Tavel

 

IMG_5512.jpg

IMG_5513.jpg

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